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Thread: .270 for Brown Bear?

  1. #1
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    Default .270 for Brown Bear?

    I'm attempting a Bear hunt this spring for Kodiak Browns, I have a friend that would also like to tag along and maybe take a bear of his own. My only issue is, the only rifle he owns is a .270. I know it can be done, since people have done it with pistols. But, I would like as much input on this one as possible because this guy may be my only back up at times. What do you all think?

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    Default .270

    Geez, those bears are big. a .270?
    I think the best sectional density you can get is .335 in a Hawk .277" 180 grain.

    The jackets are .035" thick and cores are soft to keep them together.

    Better make him use something heavy and premium.

    I guess having a buddy is always good. 2 sets of eyes and ears.Someone to help with 1st aid in an emergency etc..

    It's your choice. They say you never really know what you believe in until it is a matter of life and death.

    I guess you will know when it's time to hunt.

    jedi

  3. #3

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    i think a .270 is a deer rifle. for all involved in this hunt he should have a proper gun for this hunt. this is dangerous game not a deer hunt.

    i consider a .30-06 with 200 gr. bullets to be the minimum. yes, i have taken a b.b. and do know first hand what it takes to kill one.
    Cold Zero
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  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default .270 for brown bear?

    The .270 is completely inadequate for brown bear, plain and simple. Yes, you can read stories of bears taken with just about anything, including a .22 rimfire rifle. But don't go there. The bear doesn't care whether the biggest rifle your friend has is a .270. Too small is still too small.

    Though I generally disagree even on using a 30.06 for brown bear, I'd rather guide a good hunter with an '06 than a guy who's afraid of his .375. Listen to what the experienced hunters are telling you. Unfortunately, on the internet you don't always know who those guys are...

    What caliber are you using?

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  5. #5

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    A friend killed one with his 270 on Kodiak back in the 70's, and as a matter of fact it was in full charge. Dropped on the second shot. But my friend went out and bought a 338 the very next week. He is a very good shot, but feels strongly he was lucky. He said if it had been a clean broadside shot with lots of time and a relaxed bear he wouldn't have any qualms about using the 270 again, but that's not what he dealt with.

    You used one important word: Backup.

    You're not talking about clean broadside shots at relaxed bears in a backup situation. I'd tell him if he wants to go, get a heavier rifle, then I'd make sure he shot it darned well and fast.

    If he wanted to hunt with his 270 that's his business if he can find a guide that will let him. Of course his guide's backup is likely to be a 375. Most consider the 338 too light for backup. Just make sure you use a different guide when he goes on his 270 hunt.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    shot mine brownie with a .270 on a caribou hunt and was amazed at what it did to that bear...big holes on the out, complete pass thrus, go figure..smaller faster bullets will do that.
    would i take it out for brownie on purpose, no. if i had one in my hand a saw a nice bear would i hesitate..no. would i recommend it for brownie..no. if i had a real gun and some one had one with them and wanted to tag along, would i let them. yes. make sure he's got some decent bullets in it.
    Master guide license #212.....now what?!

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    It has nothing to do with what rifle, cartridge or day pack you are using. It all boils down too what bullet you are using and how much tissue damage that bullet will do and how quickly it will do it. No animal unless shot in the cranium or other parts of the CNS is going to drop right on the spot and just lay there. You have to stop the flow of blood to the brain. The more tissue damage you can do the faster that will happen. A bullet starting with high sectional density will retain more of the sectional density after the expansion process has started. A bullet with very high sectional density and frontal area after expansion has started will penetrate much better than a bullet with low sectional density and little frontal area. It all comes down to using the correct bullet and putting that bullet in the correct spot. Stop the flow of blood to the brain as quickly as possible and you have a dead animal.
    Allen Glore

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    Unhappy .270??

    Just saw a dude on the "versus" channel take an elephant with a cross bow.

    What is this world coming too?

    At least he had 3 backup shooters and gunbearers plus a guy with a camera who wudda been real slow running.

    A .270 seemed like a bad situation to me...now it seems only semi-bad.

    jedi

  9. #9
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    I'd rather take a guy that's really good with a 270 that a guy who's mediocre with a 338.

    But what do I know? I've hunted Afognak using a 270 for elk while my back-up gunner carried a 270.

  10. #10

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    Yup.

    The whole point of backup is emergency shooting at terrible angles, sometimes face on but more likely right up the poop chute. That's simply not the terrain of a light fast bullet. My friend was happy his shots were in a charge rather than a goin-away follow up, simply because the bullet has less to penetrate to get at vitals.

    Ask a guide about going-away follow-up shots and they'll express the same concern even with heavy calibers. All I know shoot for the base of the tail in order to shatter the pelvis or damage the spine- in order to break the bear down and stop it for a kill shot. That's why most don't like the 458 and such, preferring something a lot flatter like a 375 or even one of the 416's. Each followup shot is likely to be further and further away and the 458 trajectory simply won't cut it when a bear is 300-400-500 yards away and running over broken terrain.

    Your first job is to stop them ASAP no matter which way they are pointed, and you can deal with niceties like kill shots at a little more leizurely pace than after tracking one into deep alders a half a mile from where it was when the client shot.

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    Wink A Fast Miss Is Fast Miss!

    There are better calibers out there, But if you , or your friend can"t shoot them well they are no good to you. Use good bullets,with the higher SD put them / it in the right place and, bingo dead bear. I"ve never shot a brown bear, but listened to may who did, and not all guides/ hunters shoot the super magnums!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Interesting comments, BrownBear. I shot a brownie once with a 300 Wby. I had broken her spine leaving her hind legs useless. A friend tried to finish her using a 375-.06, whose slow and heavy bullets hit and deflected off even small bones from inside 150 yards. That's my only experience with slow heavy bullets, and it'll be my last. My Barnes-X 180gr in 300 Wby were up to the task.

  13. #13

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    Haven't done it myself, but I trust the experience of the dozen or so guides and packers I know who have collectively done it hundreds of times. Certainly without lots and lots of firsthand experience discussing terminal performance is like discussing car models to predict berry crops, but I trust folks who have done it lots and trust the numbers they have accumulated. The most important choice in a hunt is who you choose to stand next to you. I know how I'll make my choices.

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    Wink

    BRWNBR, i"m curious do you recall the bullet make , and weight? Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    I almost got laughed out of Cold Bay in 95' when I mentioned that I was there to hunt brownies with a .338 by all the guides and hunters.Couldn't imagine telling them I was there to hunt with a .270!

  16. #16

    Default .270 for hunting brown bears? NO!!!!!!

    No way is a .270 adaquate for these bears. A number have been taken with it, of course, but it is just too small and this can get you or your friend killed. If he wants to go with you on a big bear hunt, make him take an adaquate gun. If he can afford the huge expense of the hunt, a few hundred dollars for a good caliber bear rifle should be within his means, or he could borrow one. If not, maybe he should stay home.

    Sorry to sound so brash, but until you have faced one in full charge, you can surmise all you want on the merits of a small caliber gun, but you know not what you say. I have, and the .375 H&H I was carrying felt very small in my hands until I had put my bear down at close range and coming hard. I had to shoot it in the face from the hip, and that is something I would never recommend to anyone to experience. If I had had a smaller gun, I do believe it would not have stopped that bear, as it was angry and was not bluffing. Proper bullets are a must, also. That's what made this 9'3" brownie charge us. I was using Hornady factory bullets and they hit the bear broadside at less than 60 yards. The bullet exploded right under the hide, rolled the bear and when it regained its feet, it immediately locked on my buddy and was coming hellbent for leather, head low swinging side to side, popping its jaws and m-a-d. It happened so fast, I had to shoot it from the hip at a few yards, as it covered the distance between us faster than you can realize. I hit it right beside it's nose and blew its brains out. It was mere feet from us when it slid to a stop. It all happened so fast, my buddy didn't have time to get his gun up to shoot.

    Bottom line, carry enough gun with the best bullets you can find, and then enjoy yourself. I went to Nosler Partitions after this exclusively, and have never had another issue with bullet performance.

    I shot my 7'4" Interior grizzly with my .280 Remington using 160 grain Nosler Partitions, but this was during a moose hunt, and it killed it quickly. The griz was walking and feeding and never knew what hit it. But you are talking brown bears, and therein lies the difference. Brownies can get huge, and these bears are very tough. You need an adaquate gun to take them quickly.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  17. #17
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    Smile .270?

    Well I do thank you all for your comments, and now I'll try and give you a little more background and answer those few questions you had.

    We are both in the Coast Guard up here in Kodiak, and work with the Military Police (I know we suck). I have had several experiences with bears up close and very personal in Buskin Park (2 inside of 20ft and another 5 or so inside of 20yrds.) I've had the pleasure of running off those bears that harrass the fishermen in the park for the last year and a half. Only shot one, (with rubber bullets). So I have a little experience with the bears behavior, but it is limited and not in a natural environment. So, there will be no guide on this hunt as my friend and I are residents here in Kodiak, and we will be hunting the road system. I'm still trying to decide which rifle to use: my .300 win mag (sightron 3x9x42)or my 45-70gvt(guide gun iron sights) I've got the corbon hard cast 405gr for the 45-70 and havn't decided on the .300's ammo yet (open to suggestion). I have also toyed with the idea of taking both rifles and sleeping with the 45-70 @ night. I also always carry my Ruger Redhawk in .45colt (Corbon 335gr cast +P) too. (I know it will only make them madder, but it makes me feel better). So there I am in a nut shell, Let'er rip!

  18. #18

    Wink

    g.s.;

    first off, i salute your service and i have been on your base. it is the big league for the u.s.c.g.. top of the food chain.

    what month are you hunting?

    that being said, now you are talking real or viable guns. either the .300 w.m. or the guide gun will work. i would prefer the guide gun if shots were expected to be inside 100 yds. if you feel the shots could go to 200 yds then the .300 with 200 gr. nosler partitions would be the way i would go. the sidearm is added insurance, if it makes you feel better. it will give you something to do while being eaten.

    when i took my 11' b and c b.b. i used 250 gr n.p. .340 wthby. nothing like big heavy bullets.

    good hunting, be prepared, be safe.
    Cold Zero
    Member: S.C.I., N.R.A. Life Endowment Member & L.E. Tactical Firearms Instr.

    **For Private contact email me, P.M. usually full.*

  19. #19
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    longhunter i was shooting 140 noslers i think, the federal load. i'm pretty sure it was 140's or 150's. i was amazed at how they operated in that bear...built my confidence. 56 yards. i shot four times, cause i could, she went down on every shot and two of the shots were while she was on the ground, just for grins. traveled a total of four feet.
    Master guide license #212.....now what?!

  20. #20

    Default Rifle thoughts

    G.S.
    Thanks for your service to our Country even though it is sending our military mixed messages these days.
    Between the two rifles you have, give your "backup" the other one to practice and get famliar with. That being said, even though I really like the .270Win (6 in the safe) it is NOT brownie medicine. I'd rather have a Rem 870 with slugs than a .270. Have fun and good luck!

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