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Thread: Can't believe it !!!

  1. #1
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    Default Can't believe it !!!

    I asked for any stories that some of you wild and wooly bush pilots might want to share with the world. Do you mean to say that none of you has had any Alaska flying experience that is worth the telling? Surely Mr Pid and FloatPilot must have had had a surprising, scary, or just plain exciting flight or two . . . . .

    Or do you just not like the way I write?

    Mort

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Mort, I played a lot of hockey as a kid. Won some pretty impressive championships down south over my younger years too. That said if Brett Hull asked me to tell my greatest hockey story I don't think I would have anything of note to discuss...

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Mort, I played a lot of hockey as a kid. Won some pretty impressive championships down south over my younger years too. That said if Brett Hull asked me to tell my greatest hockey story I don't think I would have anything of note to discuss...
    Well, we're all just airplane drivers after all. Once ya get 'er off the ground, your life is in your own hands. All your flying couldn't have been sunny skies and smooth landings. Some of us are older, maybe, but none of us is any better than the rest of us.

    And, if you can't think of any particularly heroic flights, how 'bout some of your boo-boos? I'll show you mine if you'll show me yours!

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    What's my cut?

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    Mort,
    I hate to say it but in my experience it is usually the biggest mistakes that make the best stories. Having said that I am not sure I want the "by line" associated with most of my gaff's. Also in order for the story to be entertaining it has to connect to the reader in one way or another. I am not exactly sure of who the target audience is and the story of me blowing a grass hut down in the Panamanian jungle may not be as funny to one person as it is to another.

    Drew
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

    Scott Adams

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    Mort; See my post on "Sad Day". Same goes for here and what toddler says also. Now,.... in person some time, ftf, I've got lots of really interesting adventures and "mistakes" that I have lived to tell about. :-0 :-)

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    Hey Mort,
    I am not yet even remotely going to pretend to be qualified as wild or wolly, or even an Alaska bush pilot, since I am just starting out up here...But are these supposed to be Alaska stories?...I love to share lots of SAR adventures...just not many up here...But over the pacific picking up the pieces of others misfortunes..Best of Luck

    Sempre Paratus

    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by IndyCzar View Post
    Hey Mort,
    I am not yet even remotely going to pretend to be qualified as wild or wolly, or even an Alaska bush pilot, since I am just starting out up here...But are these supposed to be Alaska stories?...I love to share lots of SAR adventures...just not many up here...But over the pacific picking up the pieces of others misfortunes..Best of Luck

    Sempre Paratus

    Bob
    My last book included stories from pilots Australia and New Zealand, as I recall it. Stories from any volume of air in the world are to be included. Let me take this opportunity to suggest to those who don't wish to share their "mistakes" with others: We all hope to learn from the mistakes of others, because we won't live long enough to make them all ourselves! Both my books admit to my own mistakes, indluding wheels-up landings, show-off landings that went wrong, and deep snow mistakes on wheels.

    So, whatcha scared of, you guys? I know you're not too good to never make mistakes! Admit one or two of them for the good of newer airplane drivers . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK-HUNT View Post
    What's my cut?
    Wanna wait until I make a deal with a publisher first? I don't even know what my own "cut" will be yet . . . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toddler View Post
    Mort,
    I hate to say it but in my experience it is usually the biggest mistakes that make the best stories. Having said that I am not sure I want the "by line" associated with most of my gaff's. Also in order for the story to be entertaining it has to connect to the reader in one way or another. I am not exactly sure of who the target audience is and the story of me blowing a grass hut down in the Panamanian jungle may not be as funny to one person as it is to another.

    Drew
    The target will be other pilots, some experienced and some not. C'mon in and get your feet wet . . . We can all profit from your expereince, right?

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    Well there are a couple things holding me back right now.
    1. The holiday season with the kids and grand kids showing up.
    2. Trying to get the plane apart so I can re-build it.
    3. I already started a collection of stories intending to do the same thing. Although you have real publishing experience and I have only done the self publish with my instruction manuals. So in the long run I would probably never break even if I did my own....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  12. #12

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    OK, I'm happy to share a story or two from NZ, I don't mind if they're published or not.

    Back in my days as an instructor I had some japanese students for a PPL at one stage. I found them to be very studious and could memorize a checklist in about 30 seconds flat, but any aspect of flying that didn't have a proceedure or checklist to follow was a challenge to them. The biggest challenge however was the language barrier - although they all spoke english ( some better than others ) I still had to teach them the meaning of some of our words and phrases - such as 'orbit', as a commonly used instruction from a tower - 'orbit left to hold postion' etc.

    Flying into controlled airspace one day on cross country we recieved this clearance - " cleared into the zone, proceed on track to join downwind 02, 1500 feet or below " - pretty standard, and well within my students ability and understanding I thaught, so I was baffled when he started to turn the plane to the left. When I questioned this, he replied " What is an orbello then?"

    I witnessed this same student one day taxiing around and around in circles because he'd forgotten to untie one wing from the pickets. He thaught there was something wrong with the steering.

    Fun times.

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    Member IndyCzar's Avatar
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    Mort ,
    this is a great topic and I would love to see one-upsmanship that is the hallmark of so many wardrooms, campfires and the F Street...while most aviators love to share their experiences its important to remember the difference in a "War Story" and a "Fairy tale"...One starts out, once upon a time and the other starts out, This is no S**T guys...So while we may be cautious to share our mistakes, its important to never let the truth get in the way of a good story...

    Let the games begin...

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    Default The oriental mindset ... downunder pilot

    When I lived out in Palmer AK at Skyranch there was a JAL 747 driver that would confirm your observations and they were driving 747's. He was throught of as god, the right seat driver would look to him for every thing resembling a "decision". He wanted a co-pilot, not and admirer with out the ability to think independently.
    Last edited by ocnfish; 12-17-2010 at 19:58. Reason: reff to

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    West side of cook inlet ... Theadore creek that drains the south east side of Mt Susitna, we landed on the gas well road just out of the wooded area that goes east to a well pad the shoreline of upper cook inlet. There were gravel pullouts where you would tail your airpalne off into the muskeg to allow other vehicles & airplanes to pass. In June 1991, kings were in the river and it was a good run. That fall there was a big fall flood that ruined salmon spawnning grounds up river, log jams everywhere, it has been closed by ADFG to the taking of Kings ever sence. Landed at about 8:00 AM and did not check the tide book. Arrived at high tide and had a few hours to kill before the tide went out and the kings would concentate in the deeper pools in the river. Gonzo my dog and I ploded one half mile across the muskeg to the river and found that we had time to kill. I let him enjoy his time off the leash and I laid down the bank to take a nap, slight breeze ... no bugs. I was just about asleep when I heard a woosh woosh woosh ... When I opened my eyes and sat up there was a pair of swans following the river at about ten feet alitude. Very impressive creatures, really the 747 of the bird world and I got to see them in flight close up. By about 2:00 PM I landed a 31 inch 20 lb king on my Orvis 7 wt. flyrod using a green & white coho fly. Gonzo was done chasing bumbull bees and had dispached at least a half a dozen, must have gotten bit by one once and there ever after it was his goal to get even. He would chase and lunge, snapping his jaws, after he got them on the ground he would pull back his lips and snap at them with his front teeth just to be sure they were dead. We slogged back across the muskeg with a backpack of fresh fish. Loaded up the Cessna C-180 and pulled the plane back out on the road and flew back to Skyranch just outside of Palmer just in time to grill some fresh King Salmon for supper. A good day.
    Last edited by ocnfish; 12-17-2010 at 20:57. Reason: spelling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
    Wanna wait until I make a deal with a publisher first? I don't even know what my own "cut" will be yet . . . . .
    OK. Let us know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnfish View Post
    West side of cook inlet ... Theadore creek that drains the south east side of Mt Susitna, we landed on the gas well road just out of the wooded area that goes east to a well pad the shoreline of upper cook inlet. There were gravel pullouts where you would tail your airpalne off into the muskeg to allow other vehicles & airplanes to pass. In June 1991, kings were in the river and it was a good run. That fall there was a big fall flood that ruined salmon spawnning grounds up river, log jams everywhere, it has been closed by ADFG to the taking of Kings ever sence. Landed at about 8:00 AM and did not check the tide book. Arrived at high tide and had a few hours to kill before the tide went out and the kings would concentate in the deeper pools in the river. Gonzo my dog and I ploded one half mile across the muskeg to the river and found that we had time to kill. I let him enjoy his time off the leash and I laid down the bank to take a nap, slight breeze ... no bugs. I was just about asleep when I heard a woosh woosh woosh ... When I opened my eyes and sat up there was a pair of swans following the river at about ten feet alitude. Very impressive creatures, really the 747 of the bird world and I got to see them in flight close up. By about 2:00 PM I landed a 31 inch 20 lb king on my Orvis 7 wt. flyrod using a green & white coho fly. Gonzo was done chasing bumbull bees and had dispached at least a half a dozen, must have gotten bit by one once and there ever after it was his goal to get even. He would chase and lunge, snapping his jaws, after he got them on the ground he would pull back his lips and snap at them with his front teeth just to be sure they were dead. We slogged back across the muskeg with a backpack of fresh fish. Loaded up the Cessna C-180 and pulled the plane back out on the road and flew back to Skyranch just outside of Palmer just in time to grill some fresh King Salmon for supper. A good day.
    Good day indeed. Thanks ocnfish!

  18. #18
    Member avidflyer's Avatar
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    http://www.avidfoxflyers.com/index.p...k-that-ice-is/

    I would just cut and paste it here, but I dont think the mods would like some of my word choices to describe the various situations.. I have a few "learning experiences I wrote about over at my lil neck of the internet. The ones from akflyer you can use if you want.

  19. #19

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    This story not a funny one - but full of mistakes I hope never to make again.

    We ( the owner of the company I was working for at the time, and myself ) had decided to make use of a strip that would get our clients closer to the start point of the walking track. The strip had a notorious reputation for crashes, and when we got there to do the strip rating I could see why - uphill, rocky gravel, prevailing tail-wind for landing, and rutted lengthways with wide rolling ridges and valleys. The trick apparently was to balance the nosewheel high on a ridge while straddling it with the mains. No more than 7 knots tailwind component recommended.

    The strip rating consisted of the owner making a couple of landings successfully in calm conditions while I was a passenger on the right hand side. And that was it - I didn't even get a go. I should have spoken up and insisted at the time, but I guess I was full of over confidence in my youth and thaught I was bullet-proof, so I agreed that this would be sufficient and off we went.

    My first flight in there in a C172 with 3 guys on-board the conditions were less than perfect with exactly the recommended 7 knots tailwind showing on the GPS. Well I underestimated the effect that had on my ground-speed, and lost directional control on the gravel - now stradling that hump with left mainwheel and nose wheel to one side, and right main to the other in a speedy skid. This put the prop in close proximity to the ground and inevitably struck a base-ball sized rock.

    After slowing a little I regained control and used momentum to turn at the top of the strip facing down-hill for take-off. Shutdown - and when the prop stopped my heart sank and I got a sick feeling. There was a neat little curl at the the end of the blade like a perfect surf wave in miniature.

    I apologised to the clients for the rough landing and sent them on their way - I dont think they noticed anything - they didn't say anything. After an inspection for any further damage - which luckily there was none I re-started the engine to test see how it was looking. There was a noticable vibration. Now I was faced with a decision - Do I risk damage to the engine and fly home?, or since the strip is remote with no road to it - do I walk out and call in a team to dis-assemble and fly it out?

    Lets get some opinions before I finish the story by telling what I did.

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    I'm sure I'm in the same situation as many career pilots. I've had a few memorable experiences, but most of them are too embarassing to go online with, generally involving poor judgment.

    What I'd recommend (seriously) is showing up at Bethel or one of the other major rural hubs with a couple kegs of beer and a few jugs of Jose Cuervo....you'll get some flying stories!...Louis
    Louis Knapp

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