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Thread: Beginners Compound

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    Default Beginners Compound

    Anyone have a good suggestion and a good compound bow for a beginner?? was thinking PSE, Mathews or big bear archery...

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Is the beginner an adult or still growing?

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    an adult...mentally im not too sure about..hahaha

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    Well depending on your location I'd recommend checking out the local proshops and trying out there line of bows. They will also be able to guide you into the addicting sport of archery. If your in Anchorage there are a few good shops, Backcountry Archery, Bill is great to deal with. Another is Full Curl Archery. Go around and shoot some bows and see what you like. Plenty of good bows out there from any manufacturer, what matters is if the bow feels right to you.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Brand name is far less important than "feel" in your hand. I have found "good deals" on sites like CL. I have also found them at pro shops. The advantage of going to a local pro shop is that they can measure your proper draw length, set you up with a good bow, then provide "instructions" on how to shoot the right way. To me, they sure beat going to the big warehouse places, or buying on-line at a big outlet store. Nothing beats the "personal" attention you get at a pro shop. IMHO the shops in Alaska are looking for return customers, not a one-time sale...so they have a vested interest in making you happy from the start.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Thumbs up

    thanks for the advice fellas..and working in retail, in sporting goods for awhile now, i realize that what works best isnt necessarily the brand name but what the individual is looking for and what they are going to be doing with it..the reason that i ask about "brand names" specifically is because customer service is one of the most important attributes to having a return customer. i personally look at warrenty coverage and how well a company works with its customer for what we pay to do something we all love to do. i plan on buying one solid bow that i wont have to worry about for a looooong time. once again, thanks for the advice

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    Sorry I'm late.. just came across this thread..

    I'd recommend the beginner doesn't get a bow that has to much draw weight - it's a common mistake among archers. Form and accuracy are more important than draw weight. IMO an archer should be able to draw his bow (speaking compound here), come to rest, and hold for 4-5 seconds before releasing his arrow. If he starts to shake before his fifteenth arrow, his draw weight is to much - if he gets tired to fast, he'll get frustrated, quit, or build bad habits. (This is the method I used helping other first timers set-up, it may need to be adjusted and may not work for everyone)

    In my experience, an adult male starting off at 50lbs and an adult female starting off at 30-45lbs (depending on upper body strength) is usually best and builds proper form and strengthens your core. Some archers have the ability to jump right in at 60, 70, and 80lbs but I don't recommend it. Some can take the weight.. other's can't. Overtime, the beginner will become more proficient, then, and only then should you start increasing draw weight. Nothing's worse than watching a guy at the range shake and 'aim at the moon' when drawing his bow only to take a break between three arrows. It's also not safe.

    One last thing. You didn't mention shooting style. If your friend is going to shoot fingers, make sure the bow's longer to avoid 'finger pinch'. If he plans to use a release, a shorter bow will work OK. There are many things to consider if you want to really do you research but all and all you should be fine.. most bows today are built a heck of a lot better than they were 20 years ago.

    Good luck!
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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    A couple friends of mine just got started shooting bows and both bought a Diamond Razor Edge. Online or at Sportsman's you can get one from just over $300 and it comes as a fully equipped bow with sights, rest, etc. You just have to get arrows and a release and start shooting. It also has adjustable draw length and draw weight, so just about anyone can use it and gradually go up in draw weight. Hope you find what you are looking for.

    Mike

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    thanks again for all the info, i am most def gonna check out that Diamond razor set up... that sounds like the most promising without having to drop alot of $$$ for a beginner setup. the last time i shot was about 6 years ago and it was set at about 55 lbs and i can imagine that is perfect for lmost thinned skinned animals.

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    Another option is to try Craigslist.. I've found four or five this last week that were good deals just make sure to stop in and have the pro-shop look at it first. 55lbs is will work just fine for most of Alaska's game, just be sure to do your research on arrow spine and weight and know your effective range.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanOutdoorsman View Post
    Another option is to try Craigslist.. I've found four or five this last week that were good deals just make sure to stop in and have the pro-shop look at it first. 55lbs is will work just fine for most of Alaska's game, just be sure to do your research on arrow spine and weight and know your effective range.
    what is recommended arrow on anything except for brownies?? these have all been helpfull

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommy-v38 View Post
    what is recommended arrow on anything except for brownies?? these have all been helpfull
    Looks like you are looking for a flame war ;-) Asking which arrow is best is like asking which bullet is best...everyone has ther own idea/opinion. Arrow manufacturing today is far superior to what it was just 10 years ago. Most are very well made and easy to use and run $50-$100/dozen...you can find cheaper and more expensive, but why would you want to? My general rule of thumb is, aluminum arrows bend if misused (I am way to hard on them removing them from targets) while carbons are always straight (which is important when learning to shoot). I started with aluminum when carbon were hated by most hunters because they could be dangerous the way they were made...today, I see more carbon than aluminum in the field. I started with Beman long before Easton bought them out and I have never found any reason to go to another brand. Watch the smoke from the flame you have created LOL!
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Roger45's right.. it can be a heated topic among hunters and while I didn't mean to, I may have opened a can of worms trying to help.

    I won't go into the aluminum vs. carbon debate, but that's one argument. In addition, some hunters believe in lighter arrows which give you a faster speed and flatter trajectory while some prefer a heavy arrow that has more KE and penetration. Other's don't care and split the difference choosing an arrow in the middle of the charted range. (often archers in this group use the same arrows for both hunting and target, myself, I increase arrow spline when hunting) IMO if your shooting no-more than say, 25 yards there isn't much difference (especially with today's gear). If your shooting farther, however, a heavier weighted arrow (IMO) is a smarter choice because it carries more energy and will have better penetration and pass through at greater distances. Heavier arrows generally fair better in the wind.

    On the flip side, 3D and target archers generally shoot lighter splined arrows (some shoot arrows as light as possible) to increase speed and flatten trajectory. This helps when shooting unknown distances and it can make up points when misjudging yardages on targets. In target archery, your not worried about KE and penetration, just scoring points and 'breaking the line'. Lighter arrows have made the difference for me in a few 3D-shoots.. without them I would have scored lower and been out of the money.

    Again, archers debate this issue all the time and after shooting a while you'll develope your own opinions on what's 'best'. Everyone's different. In the end, what ever spline arrow you decide to shoot, the most important thing is shooting tight groups and your accuracy. Shoot both field tips and broadheads - they fly different (although you can buy some that fly similar to eachother). Know your effective range and limits and above all get out and shoot.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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    LOL sorry fellas! didnt mean to start a heated to debate there! (can you tell i havent shot much?) haha..that now makes sense ever since the bullet analogy made perfect sense...haha i guess all and all i will have to get a practice bow and GET OUT THERE! I'm psyched up now!

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    Default the two step

    Quote Originally Posted by tommy-v38 View Post
    i plan on buying one solid bow that i wont have to worry about for a looooong time. once again, thanks for the advice
    Consider two stepping it.

    First, find the right draw length. Second, buy a cheap bow that has minimal draw poundage. Next practice until that's perfect.

    Then buy the hunting bow. Now is the time to choose the right one, not before.

    Shooting a bow requires the use of back muscles that to my knowledge are used for nothing other than shooting a bow. If you're not up to it lately, then they're slack'n off. Work'm up to speed, and try to keep them that way.

    But I'd really recommend considering a cheap work'm up bow that doesn't pull much until the shooter's muscles are in shape.

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    i will most definitely keep that in mind..i have worked in a gym and realise that form is everything! but i have noticed that alot of bows have adjustable weight setting that i can move when i feel confident. thanks for the tips tho. all are appreciated

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