Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Hunting unit 15B

  1. #1

    Default Hunting unit 15B

    I was looking at hunting units closest to Sterling were i will be living. Area 532 in 15B looks like a valley running down to a Glacier. Am i correct and has any one had success?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    499

    Default

    You pretty much have to have horses to expect to shoot a moose in this area and pack it out, unless you got an army of 20 guys to help you. In areas like this on the peninsula you got one day to get your moose out or the brownies will be all over it. This area you are referring to is the Tustumena Ridge and the overwhelming majority of successful hunters in this area take horses. This area is part of the kenai national moose range so there are only a couple of lakes that you are legally allowed to land and get dropped off on. This is mainly the reason why horses are required for this hunt because walk-in hunters just can't walk more than a couple miles and expect to pack a moose out. Especially like I said in areas like the Tustumena Ridge you have one day to cut your moose up and start packing it out or the brownies will be all over it.

  3. #3

    Default

    I was trying to match The Alaska fish an Game map to a Google topo map. I reckon i was off a mite. So, this area is pretty wild. I actauly already own a pair of horses, that the wife an i use for trail riding. Maybe i should start chucking deer quarters on them. I was concerned that it may not be remote enough to get good hunting. Does the state of Alaska expect me to GIVE my Moose to the bear, or am i alowed to contest ownership?

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Hopefully by the time you get up here we can convince the k-pen biologists we need to either greatly expand the draw hunt, start a registration hunt, or just have a plain old general hunt for brownies. If we started hunting brownies that will greatly help with the bears. 10 to 15 years ago when someone shot a moose on the k-pen you would cut a meat rack and let it hang there for a couple days until you were done hunting. I don't know many people that do that anymore because of the brownies, this year I saw 6 different brownies in one night all within several hundred yards of one gut pile. Another thing you wouldn't know by looking at the current draw hunts on the tustumena ridge is that there used to be a late season hunt during the peak of the rut for trophy 50 plus inch moose only, but this hunt no longer exists thanks to the brown bears and wolves.

  5. #5

    Default

    Rifle shoots ring like dinner bells huh? I read ya'll have a high black bear population on the pen.

  6. #6
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,890

    Default

    There are a lot of black bear in the mountains all over the peninsula

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crew Dawg View Post
    Does the state of Alaska expect me to GIVE my Moose to the bear, or am i allowed to contest ownership?

    Once the bear has taken possession of the kill, it is the bears property. Which is a problem as the antlers are the last trip out by law. So what we do is hang the antlers and cape in a tree, butcher the moose, take dozens of photos of the meat in bags, take what can be packed on the first load. When returning and there is a bear on the kill, photo that also, take the antlers if that can be done safely, as now that is the last load. Best to hang the antlers high and 200 yards from the kill site. There are places on the Alaska Peninsula that the bears watch you butcher the moose, and move in as you move out. Some times you have to move out early. Like everything in Alaska there is a LOT of Grey area in this. Because we push bears out of camp all the time, and even though not legal I have pushed a lot of bears off kills. But it is illegal.

  8. #8
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default

    As mentioned DM532 is remote and wild, and horses required. But I have seen moose backpacked out of DM538, though its not easy. The way it is done is to hunt the back side swamp of Lake Emma. At Lake Emma is a public use cabin that is free to use, first come first serve but if you're smart you'll share it with the locals that pass that way. There is a boxed in porch on this cabin where the meat could be hung. If you get your moose down pack it to that cabin first, then shuttle the loads down to the lake. Be courteous and cover the floor and leave the cabin at least in the same shape you found it. At the bottom of the hill is another cabin that is privately owned. That one is mine. You can stay there and hang your meat in a tree until you get the job done. High water on Tustumena occurs at the very end of August since it is glacier fed and so the beach will be covered and difficult to impossible for horse travel. Beginning Sept. 1 the temperature drops and the lake will begin to recede from the shore. If you go with horses at that time into that country you would need to be dropped off and picked up with a landing craft.

    Another option is to engage the services of an outfitter. There are packers with horses that work these areas to take you in and out, but its not cheap. The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge will be able to tell you who is licensed to be an outfitter since they are the land manager for these areas. There is usually an outfitter that runs horses up bear creek trail.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •