Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: 50" bull? New rangefinder aids in sizing rack...

  1. #1
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    177

    Default 50" bull? New rangefinder aids in sizing rack...

    Leupold has a new rangefinder coming out (late spring) that has the ability for the user to range the size of the rack. Although I haven't seen it until I went to Sportsmans WHouse 't, I'd be interested to see it. Anyone have knowledge of this product, I don't see it on their website www.leupold.com The rangefinder has a recticle simialar to z-plex w/hash marks (like moa) on the left horizontal plane allowing one to "judge" the rack size. Sounds okay, but I'd definately prefer to physically count the brow tines...
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Use the forehead whith and the marks you have in your scope allready to estimate the whith of the rack. 8.5 inches between antlers on most bulls close to 50" you can do the math.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default Moose spread

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Use the forehead whith and the marks you have in your scope allready to estimate the whith of the rack. 8.5 inches between antlers on most bulls close to 50" you can do the math.
    Monkey,

    I have heard of the method you mentioned, but the measurement I have heard used is 10 inches from antler base to antler base. I have used this method to estimate antler spread and it is not reliable. Neither is the other method- 20 inches from eartip to eartip. Both measurements are estimates, and can be used to generally figure out what you're looking at, however there are so many variables in this area, that both are too risky to be 100% reliable.

    The best way I know of to accurately judge moose antler spread is to look at a LOT of moose. I've been hunting them for twenty years plus, and still find myself watching the ADFG video, "Is this moose legal?" every year. Between seasons I try to guess the spread on every moose I see, especially mounts, and use that to keep the edge sharp. It takes lots of practice, as you know.

    Anyway, I wanted to point out that these tools are for estimates only; some of the new hunters here may make a mistake if they are not careful with this.

    Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  4. #4
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default What?

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Use the forehead whith and the marks you have in your scope allready to estimate the whith of the rack. 8.5 inches between antlers on most bulls close to 50" you can do the math.
    What are you talking about?
    What marks are there in a scope and how do you put marks in a scope?
    What is a "whith" on a moose?

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,073

    Default

    How many moose have you taken with this method, AKPM?

  6. #6
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Use the forehead whith and the marks you have in your scope allready to estimate the whith of the rack. 8.5 inches between antlers on most bulls close to 50" you can do the math.
    That also depends on your scope. If your scope through magnification enlarges the recticle in proportion or if it maintains its original size. I foresee your method could cause problems for those with a scope that magnifies the recticle when power is increased...
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    So its been about 10 years since i've seen is this moose legal... anyway a rangefind that could do that could be cool I suppose.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8

    Default

    That is a GREAT idea, I suspect they could easily set some lines on the viewfinder that make the lins 50" apart at a given distance, or for that matter with a simple addition to the program it could measure the distance then draw lines at 40", 50" 60" etc. Actually very very easy to add to the program. Provided you ranged the moose and not some other object it should work good.

  9. #9
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    177

    Default That's what I am talking about!

    Quote Originally Posted by DonV View Post
    That is a GREAT idea, I suspect they could easily set some lines on the viewfinder that make the lins 50" apart at a given distance, or for that matter with a simple addition to the program it could measure the distance then draw lines at 40", 50" 60" etc. Actually very very easy to add to the program. Provided you ranged the moose and not some other object it should work good.
    DonV~ that is why I started this thread... Leupold already has one, it is due out in late spring...
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  10. #10
    Member AKdutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    103

    Default Rangefinder

    I'm probably going to be laughed at a little, but I figured out last year that you could actually use a rangefinder to measure a set object. I had my buddy hold a cloth tape measure up above his head that measured 50" from hand to hand. I used the reticle hash marks on my rangefinder to determine that the horizontal mark was 50" at 300 yards, and the vertical(had to roll the rangefinder over) was 50" at I believe was 150 yards. I was able to accurately guess a 50" measurement several times from 300 yards, to the inch. I figured this out after passing on several moose on that probably were well over 50", but was afraid to be wrong.

    Unfortunately we were not able to actually try this on a live moose cause the next one we saw was a fork and we shot it. I was not planning on trying to estimate the exact width, but I knew that if the rack was wider than the hash mark at a set distance, it had to be over 50". John

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I am Valley trash.
    Posts
    589

    Default It is coming

    I talked with someone last week at Chimo's in Wasilla and he mentioned that he just got back from ???? and mentioned that Leupold had a new rangefinder called the "Boone & Crocket" that will be out in earlier summer. It has a 50 inch marks in it and this mark will vary with distance. So at 100 yards the 50 inches mark may equal 1/2 inch and at 300 yards it will be more like 1/8 inch. Not sure what I just said make sense.

  12. #12
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    1,450

    Talking rack size on draft moose?

    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  13. #13
    Member tccak71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,174

    Talking

    Will that range finder count annuli on a sheep!? That's what I need!

    Tim

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Thumbs up rangefinders....Alaskacanoe?

    Alaskacanoe....

    Is your draft moose pic photoshopped or real? If real, when and where did such a big moose volunteer for duty?

  15. #15
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,435

    Default

    the light on that Moose rack don't look quiet right...?
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  16. #16
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    177

    Default Off topic, but a photo "chop" if I ever saw one...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Alaskacanoe....

    Is your draft moose pic photoshopped or real? If real, when and where did such a big moose volunteer for duty?
    If women had racks like that moose.... I'd be more inclined to hang around during hunting season!
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  17. #17

    Default A scope design sent to Leupold in 2004!

    Here is a letter that I sent in to Leupold back in 2004! Some may not believe me, some will, doesn't matter to me. The end result of this product is what is important.

    Below it, is my second letter to them, thanking for their reply about the design. I posted the image I sent them.

    As an avid hunter, I hope this new rangefinder works for all of us! One more "tool" to harvest a legal animal. I hope that my simple design inspired them to create the new RX-IV B&C rangefinder. They are sending me one of the first ones made to test out! They are also throwing in a hat & shirt, oh boy!

    I sincerely hope this product works out for all of us. Will keep the forum posted about it when I get it in.

    "MooseCall"



    Leupold & Stevens, Inc.
    P.O. Box 688
    Beaverton, OR
    97075-0688

    I am writing to you in regards to an idea of mine. I am an avid Alaskan Hunter and one of my favorite big game animals to hunt is the Alaskan Moose. Many hunters that live in Alaska, and that travel to Alaska to hunt, can benefit from this idea.
    We have antler regulations on the size of Moose we shoot. Most hunting areas, called “Game Management Units”, in the state have this common regulation. The regulation states that we can only shoot a Bull Moose with an antler spread of 50” or better; or it must have four (some units allow three) brow tines on at least one side, (with a tine being at least one inch tall where it is wide), or be a spike/fork. Well, as you can imagine, this is an extremely difficult task to judge. There are not many hunters that can accurately judge the size of a Moose Rack, to within an inch. Many Moose do not have four brow tines but do have an antler spread larger than 50”.
    Recently, I shot a Moose that had a 53” spread with what looked like a possible fourth brow tine on one side. As it ended up, it was only 31/32 of an inch tall. I shot the Moose believing that it was a 3x3 with a 50” spread or greater. Three inches is cutting it very close! I shot him about 75 yards away and studied him three times very closely, as he was perfectly broadside to me.
    One common factor about Moose is that they have a 10” head span, that is the distance from eye to eye. Many hunters try to count two additional heads on each side of the actual head to get the 50” distance, then try to see if the antlers go past that distance. One other way is to see if the antlers go past the shoulder hump of the Moose, but with this way, if the Moose is not standing perfectly broadside to the hunter, then the judgement will be false.
    My idea is this; produce a scope that has these ratios, as lines that are in relation, as the scope is zoomed in and out. Like other scopes that use this technique for distance, this scope pattern will be used, in a similar way, to judge antler width. By placing the two smaller lines, representing the 10” distance, onto the eyes of the Moose, the larger lines would be showing the 50” width. Of course, this is only another item to assist hunters.
    The ratio distance is something I am sure you can figure out. Normally, most Moose are shot within the 50 to 150 yard range since they are easily called in.
    Attached is a picture of what the scope view might look like. Hopefully, this idea may be used in a new scope pattern of yours. I am sure that many hunters, not only those who live in Alaska, but others that travel here and possibly any place else in the world that has this restriction, will purchase one of these scopes. There is a very steep fine for shooting an illegal moose up here and a scope like this will surely aid the Alaskan Hunter.


    Dear Leslie,
    It was good to hear that you have interest in my “Alaskan Moose Scope” design the last time I talked with you. I am very excited about its possible development and future use.
    I have a few good candidates, listed below, to help me field-test the design. One avid hunter and good friend, who lives out in rural Alaska, mentioned it would be nice to have it as a “Spotting Scope” also.
    If there is anything else that I can do to help in the production/design of the scope pattern, please let me know. I am very excited about it’s possible development for the fall hunt.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18

    Default

    AKdutch, that is a great idea. When I DIY AK moose in 2-4 years I am going to do exactly what you did. Awesome idea.

  19. #19

    Default

    I wonder how many guys will go home without a moose - but havng passed up a moose they could have taken if they took a few hours to do exactly as you did. Considering all the time invested a few hours is a small price to pay to be able to take a 52" moose you would have otherwise passed.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •