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Thread: Clearing the holster, presenting the weapon; pros/cons of different woods-carry psns

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Clearing the holster, presenting the weapon; pros/cons of different woods-carry psns

    What are the pros/cons of each carry position - and for this discussion - applying only to carry in the woods?

    It seems like strong side carry is simplest when considering the basic motions involved in drawing, presenting, aiming a handgun carried in the woods. I know there are other reasons that people choose one carry over another. Many fishermen for instance like a shoulder or sportsman's-type holster because it keeps the pistol/revolver accessible when sitting in a raft and out of the way of other gear. But shoulder carry also involves a sweeping motion between clearing the holster and downrange presentation, which could mean more room for errors.

    These are the steps I was thinking of in the process:
    1. Strong side hand to weapon - assume firm grip
    2. Clear weapon from the holster
    3. Point muzzle in general direction of target (muzzle remains downrange from this point on until moved back toward holster)
    4. Present the weapon
    5. Sight picture acquisition and finger moves to trigger

    Choosing a cross draw or shoulder holster carry maybe is best for a person's situation, but aren't there some risks or drawbacks to these positions over strong-side carry?

    Thanks.

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    Good post. Same steps apply to any carry. A high chest carry lends itself to chest waders much better than a holster on the waist. As long as the muzzle of the gun doesn't cross any part of your body when you present it. It comes down to what you are comfortable with.

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    Member jay51's Avatar
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    I carry either strong-side or high-chest/shoulder depending on what I'm doing and what I'm carrying. Packs, rifles, and waders often mean I'm restriced to carrying in a chest-rig, usually under a coat. The weapon is safe and secure, and I can draw reasonably well.
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    I usually just grab it, and pull it out, no matter where I'm carrying it. (Assuming, I can remember where it is.)

    The more important issue involving "woods carry" is keeping it high and dry.

    But, I spose, there could be a Marketing Opportunity for someone. (A school on how to out-draw a bear.)

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I carry crossdraw now because its easier to get to with either hand for me.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I carry crossdraw now because its easier to get to with either hand for me.
    +1. Crossdraw or chest is the best way to carry when you may be sneak attacked.

  7. #7
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    The cross draw is a safe way to clear the leather, typically you are not in a range condition when a bear is making eyes on you, so you will not be sweeping another human. Some practice is a good thing to do so you feel comfortable with which ever holster you choose. While I was shooting cowboy action shooting, I carried both strong side and cross draw. We would draw the strong side pistol shoot, return to holster, then draw the cross draw, shoot and return to holster, then pick up a rifle or shotgun and continue shooting. I think this practice is good to do and helps in pressure shooting. The cross draw is high and dry when fishing, and can be used when on a 4 wheeler.

  8. #8
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I normally carry my Redhawk in a Galco DAO in the crossdraw position. I find this comfortable and practical. It is particularly comfortable (& accessible) if you are using a vehicle of some sort (car, ATV, snow-go, skiff or horse) to access much of your hunting area. I like it because I spend more than a fair amount of time on my backside glassing and it is out of the way. The only exception is laying prone, but if I have time get in the prone position I suspect I'll have time to secure the revolver from the holster for comfort.
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  9. #9

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    This is a bit of an aside, but we talked about a few carry positions in a gun disarming class I took recently. It turned out that positions that require the shooter to reach across their body are the easiest to pin down; I'd imagine that the same could apply in a situation where a bear has managed to make contact.

    My favorite position is in a chest holster. They're about the only method that works when carrying a backpack, which is something I have with me 100% of the time I'm in the outdoors. Shoulder holsters sometimes work, but they tweak my back a little if the gun is too heavy. Tacticool thigh holsters do a good job of keeping a gun out of the way, but you end up lifting the gun with every step, which seems like a waste of energy.

    I'd suppose that chest holsters have the advantage of being practical with packs, and that they can be drawn with either hand, if somewhat awkwardly off-hand. The main disadvantage I've had is one unfortunate gun/holster combo that kept pointing the barrel at the family jewels. I was so paranoid I carried the revolver with an empty chamber that trip.
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    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    I have used each, but usually go back to the Chest-carry because it is out of the way and fast and easy to access. Works well with packs too. Take a look at my avatar for my carry of the 480. Jim

  11. #11

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    Its a shame I know, but I only carry if I am out backpacking and it is NOT hunting season, meaning I am not carrying a rifle along anyways. In such instances I carry it on the waist belt of my backpack in a holster that straps easily to either side of my waist belt of the pack. It works well regardless of if I need to throw a rain coat on or off quickly and doesn't interfere with me wanting to carry binoc on my chest on a summer scouting endeavor. Plus if desired I can swap it to my belt holster very quickly if desired when stopped for the day and wondering around that nights camp.

  12. #12

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    My holster choice takes into consideration moments when my pants might be down. I had a deer come crashing through the brush once while squatting peacefully, enjoying "true oneness with nature". I realized that as much as I might think I can react quickly, at that moment I would have been toast, even with my gun in hand. The best I can say is, "I kept my balance". = Chest holster.

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