Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Homemade Bear Lard: $50 per pound?

  1. #1

    Default Homemade Bear Lard: $50 per pound?

    When your making dinner do you use homemade bear lard or good old fashion butter?

    This link claims French pastry chefs love bear lard (some claiming its the best lard available) and it reportedly sells for as much as $50 a pound. Anyone have the ability to reference another source that will concur?

    I thought the statement was uncanny since bear lard used to be used in cosmetics, so I did a little research and found Wikipedia doesn't reference bear lard and instead states Lion lard is supposedly the best available. A Google search sent me to links directing its recommended use in pie crusts and for cooking donuts but not much else. I don't own any French cookbooks (nor do I read French) so I can't validate any of the claims of the link above.

    Curious to everyone's thoughts.. anyone use bear lard for cooking? If so, how is it? The little I've read says it's actually good but will most likely give you a heart attack!
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,340

    Default

    Here is a couple vids that I came across recently




  3. #3

    Default

    We render down all of the black bear fats we can get out hands on. It really does make some of best pastries & breads you can get, it is also great for frying. You metabolize it better than any other fat and it will help you metabolize other fats. We don't have refrigeration and rendered bear fat does not go rancid during the summer. If we could get more of it would be the only fat we would use.
    Chuck

  4. #4
    Member bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    2,746

    Default

    We render the fat down and use it for cooking and pastries as well. VERY good stuff!
    Toss large pieces of cleaned fat in a large (turkey deep fryer) pan and bring to heat slowly. Do not boil, only warm to a liquid stage.
    Once liquid, strain and pour into containers to store in the fridge.
    Done this way, it's simple and the final product looks identical to Crisco lard, pure white and creamy.
    Can also be used for softening leather, boot H2O proofing, etc...
    BK

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    the final product looks identical to Crisco lard, pure white and creamy.
    BK
    Except it don't clog your arteries like crisco
    Chuck

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    775

    Default

    When I was a youngster, folks spoke of rendered bear fat selling to high-end restaurants in NYC for notable money. I took it for truth, but never looked into it. The story was that it burned at considerably higher temperatures than other fats, as well.

    One question I'd considered had to do with inspection re. commercial vending/use. Is there some sort of FDA guideline or other country's agency rule(s) re. inspecting such things for commercial use?

    I know that use of wild game in commercial products is typically considered taboo/illegal. How do they avoid that issue with bear lard/tallow?

    BTW, we also heard of it being used routinely as boot/shoe grease when we were kids. Seriously.

    Might be one of those 'one-size-fits-all' sort of products.

  7. #7
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hiline View Post
    Except it don't clog your arteries like crisco
    are we SURE of this Chuck? is there anything to back it up.. i like bear lard, but rarely save any fats anymore...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    are we SURE of this Chuck? is there anything to back it up.. i like bear lard, but rarely save any fats anymore...
    Only personal experience, it is one of the few fats that doesn't make feel run down when we use it. Another thing when my wife uses it for any length of time she loses weight. She can eat food fried in it, bake with it, anything and she will lose weight. I do know that any natural fat is safer to use than any that are hydrogenated. I would be curious how it really compares to Crisco, my money is with bear fat.
    Chuck

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Uh, Willow?
    Posts
    87

    Default

    My experience with bear grease involves many pie crusts, which turned out very good, and one episode of deep frying that turned out kinda bad. If you've ever eaten too many hooligans you know how bad the deep frying turned out. The food was very crispy, but the after effects were unpleasant at best. I have a container of bear lard in the fridge. Still thinking of the deep frying has kept it there untouched.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    One question I'd considered had to do with inspection re. commercial vending/use. Is there some sort of FDA guideline or other country's agency rule(s) re. inspecting such things for commercial use?

    I know that use of wild game in commercial products is typically considered taboo/illegal. How do they avoid that issue with bear lard/tallow?
    Not all countries have the same standards as the USA. It's quite possible that the european union countries could use uninspected bear lard.

  11. #11
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    The use in NYC restaurants probably predates the FDA/USDA when there was still commercial hunting.

    Vince check out this link:
    http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats.html
    It references lots of studies that show that low fat food will kill you while you can lose weight eating natural fats.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  12. #12

    Default

    A friend of mine rendered some with last springs black bear. Not sure how long he did it for but still had a bit of a gamey smell and taste. I made homemade sweet doughnuts with it and loved it. Others thought they were a bit gamey tasting. Anyone know how long do u render it for or have a recipe for doing that?

  13. #13
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman1979 View Post
    A friend of mine rendered some with last springs black bear. Not sure how long he did it for but still had a bit of a gamey smell and taste. I made homemade sweet doughnuts with it and loved it. Others thought they were a bit gamey tasting. Anyone know how long do u render it for or have a recipe for doing that?
    Here is a link to how to render lard - it goes to pig lard but it is the same process to render bear lard or tallow for that matter.
    http://blog.siffordsojournal.com/201...nder-lard.html

    I have a copy of The Victory Cook Book from 1943. While it does not go into detail about how to store lard (also referred to as shortening in most of the book) it does cover making, use, care, clarifying and some storage tips. It said that to store it to keep it in a dry, cool, dark place away from air. Most other times when they suggest these conditions they recommend a root cellar if you have one. I have rendered fat before and had no problem putting the lard into warm canning jars and covering with a ring and lid. As the mixture cools it will seal the jar and it does not go rancid.
    To improve the flavor and texture of lard it is recommended to add 1/2 cup of milk to 1 pound of fat. Then render it in a double boiler. Sweet, sour, or butter milk may be used.
    If the cracklins have a good flavor they may be substituted for other fats in other dishes. Notably, corn meal and graham flour mixtures. It also works well in hash brown potatoes, corn meal mush that is to be fried, and any kind of baked hash.
    If you burn/smoke your lard while rendering or it picks up disagreeable flavors thru cooking you should melt it and for each pound or pint add 1 medium sized potato cut in to 1/4" slices. Gradually heat. When the fat ceases to bubble and the potatoes are well browned, strain the fat thru several thicknesses of cheese cloth, and set aside to cool. When ready to use scrape away and discard the sediment from the bottom of the cake. Potato helps clarify and purify the lard.


    You can render on the stovetop, crock pot, or in the oven. Stove top use a stockpot 1/2-2/3 full on low-medium heat and add a little water or milk to aid in heat distribution till some of the lard melts ( takes 2-8 hours depending on amount and temperature). In a crock pot set it on high and add the water or milk and wait 4-8 hours. A crock pot does not brown the cracklings, at least mine does not. If you want to brown them put them into a 375-425 degree oven and render for an additional 15-30 minutes till golden brown. Or you can do the whole process at the 350 degrees in the oven.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •