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Thread: Wolf hunting

  1. #1
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    Default Wolf hunting

    Got a question for the masses here. I don't know much about wolf hunting but was asked for some strange reason the other day. Anyhow, without giving specifics would anyone care to share where a good place to wolf hunt not more than 2 hours drive from Anchorage? I was at a loss when asked this question. I was specifically asked about Hatcher's Pass and I thought the Willow side would be better than the Palmer.

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    Two hours that really pushing it, but yes I know of 4 places you could hunt wolves. You will need a snowmobile or snowshoes. No I will not say where because it would not be fair to the guys who may or may not be hunting there.

    Big Sue
    Knik
    Little Sue
    Mile XX on the Glen.

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    If you got a snow machine, try up the Yentna or Skwentna Drainages. Another place I would try would be up the Deshka. My brother and I once flew over a fairly large size pack of wolves on the Deshka. I also saw a large pack close to Rainy Pass lodge. That is the closest places to Anchorage I have spotted wolves. I once heard a pack of wolves howling up on Lazy Mountain also. I will leave it up to you to figure out how to access these places, but there is my 2 cents. Oh, and I also forgot, one time a friend of mine (Carnivore on the hunting forum) and I were snowmachining up the little Nelchina river. We came around a bend in the river and found a yearling moose half alive and half eaten all bloodied up laying on the riverbank. Wolf tracks were all over the place. There was so much blood it looked like a massacre. I pulled out my rifle and was half tempted to put it out of it's misery. Carnivore convinced not to, because it is against the law. I was glad I heeded his advice, even though I hate leaving a wounded animal to suffer.

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    There are wolves in every good sized drainage in southcentral alaska, if theres enough prey in the area. thats what you need to start with. find out where theres alot of moose, caribou or sheep concentrated, or at least large populations of rabbits, and youll most likely find a fresh wolf track in the area. Wolves travel all over the place, wherever they can find enough to eat, which is why youll find them in places like arctic valley and eagle river, because there are lots of pets for them to chew on. In the wild places, they need alot of snow cover to help them catch moose and caribou and sheep. I know quite a few places youll likely find wolves close to town, but getting to them is gonna take alot of work, and getting one in range is gonna take alot of patience and good timing and alot more work. Try calling for them near portage, by the placer or 20-mile river valleys. also Kenai between turnagain pass and summit lakes is a great place to look and call for wolves as well. We actually were driving down the seward highway one morning past big summit lake, and saw a huge black wolf eating some fish a guy left at his ice-fishing hole on the south end of the lake. Our buddy shot at him and missed. Gone like a shot. One things for sure, they can show up anytime, anywhere. Willow side of hatcher pass gets hit hard by trappers, and I really havent seen a whole of wolf sign back up there myself. The palmer side, when your coming up alongside the little su river next to the mountain, is a good place to look for sign. Some years ive seen that area just crisscrossed and coverd with wolf tracks. You just gotta get out there and look first of all.



    Release Lake Trout

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    One things for sure, they can show up anytime, anywhere.
    That captures my thoughts on wolf hunting. I know of very few people that are able to go out hunting wolves specifically and have any kind of predictable, regular success. That is different for trappers - a skilled trapper can target wolves and have a reasonable expectation of success - but not so much hunters. Most wolves taken by hunters are taken incidentally to hunting for other species. Get out and hunt for birds, hares, other predators, etc, and while you're at it make sure you're prepared to target a wolf if luck should smile on you. If you're trying to look just for wolves within two hours of Anchorage, you're likely to be disappointed more often than not.

    Alternatively, go up into the tundra of Unit 13 and cover as many miles as possible on snowmachine. If you cover enough miles in areas with good visibility, your chances of seeing wolves will increase. Most areas of 13 fall outside your two hour stipulation, though.

  6. #6

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    Check out this youtube video I watched earlier today of a wolf called in to an electronic caller on the Kenai Penninsula. Judging by the movie, it sounded like the guy was actually targeting wolves, and the kill wasn't just incidental. Even though I totally agree with Brian.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsYFynnb34g

    I actually shot a wolf once in the Alaska Range on the Hartman River about 12 years ago when I was guiding. It was after guiding season, and everyone left camp except for me and my bosses dog. I woke up one morning and came out of the wall tent to see a large gray wolf down by the airstrip eating a caribou. I stalked to within about 200 yds, and my bosses dog started barking from separation anxiety. The dog scared the wolf, and I took an offhand 200 yard shot at this wolf that was running. I managed to get one into him and wounded him because he spun around on his haunches. I tracked him for about a mile before I lost his bloodtrail. I always regretted never finding him. Oh well. Nice size wolf too.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    From what I have read here and from talking to people there are a number of packs very close to ANC. There is one that runs up the Knik to lake george and back through Chugach State park, frequently venturing into JBER and even out on the flats. I know there is another pack that runs from Hatcher Pass out to at least Sutton area. Honestly I would bet there isn't much land outside of Palmer and Wasilla that doesn't "belong" to one pack or another. I am sure the ranges vary depending on the amount of prey available and that they overlap to some extent. The kicker is unlike yotes they have a huge range and could be anywhere in it at any time. My plan to get on a wolf if/when I get time is to head to Unit 13 stay at Alpine creek and then rack up a lot of miles on the sled. If I wanted to dedicate time to wolves right now I would head to the Steese since that is where the Caribou are hanging around there are sure to be wolves there too. Find a kill and sit on it.

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    Thanks fellas for all the great info. The two hour stipulation is a military one. I'll pass on the info. LuJon-I said in my original post that I don't know much about wolf hunting but I'm with you on staying at Alpine Creek. Stayed with them back in September for moose hunting and they're some great folks. Talked with them quite a bit and it sounded like there was plenty of wolves in that area.

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    Finding an area wolves are using is only a small part of the battle. A pack will have an enourmous range, so the real problem is figureing out WHEN the wolves (whose sign you found) will be back in that area again.

    As others have posted - you can hunt wolves ANYWHERE in Alaska; including within 2 hours of Anchorage.

    Gary

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    I have nothing against Alpine lodge, I hear it a great place to stay. The bottom line is do you want a wolf? Because if you do you need to do what ever it takes to find and hunt them, staying at a lodge any lodge will not work. Learn everything you can about wolves, wolf hunting, and winter camping. Plan on hunting for 7 days at a time and you will get your wolf. Wolves are a mobile animal you also need to be mobile.

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