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Thread: primer seating with Lee EZ prime

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    Default primer seating with Lee EZ prime

    I have been using the Lee for years, loaded thousands of .223, .243, '06, etc ... I just got a new batch of 210M for .308 and I primed 150 last night - Some of them were so difficult to seat that I was squeezing with all my strength (and I have a good grip) while others felt "normal" - Has anyone else experienced this? I am wondering if I am flirting with disaster putting that much pressure on the primer to seat

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    Not sure, but sounds like your new batch of brass or primers are out of spec?? I have used the Lee hand priming tool for years as well. You might try to dissassemble it and look for any problem areas. I had similar problem a while back and ended up breaking the lever part that the toggle fits in I was squeezing it so hard (made out of pot metal and not too strong). Ended up buying another. I would try taking it apart and cleaning it plus look for any burrs or worn areas. Good thing is they are reasonably priced if you have to buy another.

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    I had the same problem with my EZ Prime until it also broke. I bought an RCBS and won't go back. The RCBS is far superior. Each and every primer goes in easy. So that is my recommendation--buy the RCBS. I don't think you'll be disappointed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    I had the same problem with my EZ Prime until it also broke. I bought an RCBS and won't go back. The RCBS is far superior. Each and every primer goes in easy. So that is my recommendation--buy the RCBS. I don't think you'll be disappointed.
    We'll have to agree to disagree about the RCBS priming tool. I've owned one, used many more and never found one that I would call equal to the Lee, much less "superior." I've a lot of "green" on my reloading bench, but the green hand primer is a step in the wrong direction IMO.
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    I ended up breaking my lee primer handle as well. It was just priming as usually when the handle just broke. Primed several hundred to possibly over a thousand cases with it before it broke.

    I have an RCBS primer now and at first I hated it but dont remember why now. It works just fine. Plus for some of my reloading I have more than one shellholder so I just leave one in the priming tool.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    I would tend to believe the brass is the likely suspect. Do you have a primer pocket uniform tool? I wore a flat spot on the Lee tool I had to the point it would not push the primer all the way into the shell. Granted it took many thousands of loadings to do this but never really had a problem with it and this was pruchased in the late 1980's.
    The fix was to drill a hole into the flat spot and then I ran a 6-32 tap into it and threaded a screw into the hole. I then cut it off and ground it down to the original height.

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I think that the handle breaking on the Lee priming tool may be an unintended safety feature. Being able to "squeeze with all my might" a stuck or blocked primer could end badly. I use a Lee tool and if my primers don't go in smoothly I know something is wrong.
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    when i started with mine.. i had a similar issue. in that sometimes i just did not put the shell in the holder correctly. now i always make sure it is seated correctly..

    sounds like you been using yours a long time... perhaps the shell holder is dirty and not letting some seat correctly?
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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    I have been using the Lee for years, loaded thousands of .223, .243, '06, etc ... I just got a new batch of 210M for .308 and I primed 150 last night - Some of them were so difficult to seat that I was squeezing with all my strength (and I have a good grip) while others felt "normal" - Has anyone else experienced this? I am wondering if I am flirting with disaster putting that much pressure on the primer to seat
    IMHO, seating primers with "too much" pressure, is a non-issue.

    I prefer to use the primer arm on a Bench Press, so's I can get lots of leverage. I seat primers hard, and I do mean HARD.

    They only go down as far as the primer cup will let them, and the cup can't go anywhere there, inside the primer pocket. I'm of the opinion that a primer would take a lot more pressure than would any Primer Seater Tool, I can imagine.

    As to "FEEL" when seating primers. Two primer seatings, can FEEL the same, but that doesn't mean the primer is all the way down, and below the case head. It just means they FELT the same to you.

    I'm not tryin to be confrontational here, but just expressing a firm opinion.

    We'll see what others say, but I figger you're worrying over nothing of consequence.

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    I have used the Lee for years and a few years ago, bought the RCBS due to not having or finding the right Lee shell holder for 300 WSM locally. I like the RCBS because it uses the shell holder for the press, but still like the feel of the Lee. Not sure if you could ever put enough pressure on the primer with a hand tool to get into trouble Smitty?? I like the hand tools as I can tell when the primer pockets are getting loose. I have never used the primer arm on any of my presses so not sure if they have the same sensitivity??

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    It almost sound as if your using recycled military brass. If so the crimp around the primer pocket needs to be swagged so the primers will install like typical brass. If you have been doing this for a long time without issues then what has changed?

    I doubt that the primers are oversized, lots of quality control checks would have to fail for that to happen. That leads me to believe crimped pockets on salvaged brass, sorry if I'm wrong. If I'm not try one of these, they work great.

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con...uper_Swage_600

    This piece of equipment doesn't uniform the pocket. It actually reshapes the radius and makes seating primers in crimmed brass a non issue. I have a few friends that pick up at the range. Most of the 308 brass that is left behind is surplus ammo and they have crimped pockets.

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    I'm with Smitty on this, I've always primed on the press. Never had issues unless a crimped pocket sneaks into the batch. I can tell quite easily when a pocket becomes loose through the feel on the press. I've never been fond of a seperate priming tool. Just more stuff, and I have too much already.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marshall View Post
    It almost sound as if your using recycled military brass. If so the crimp around the primer pocket needs to be swagged so the primers will install like typical brass. If you have been doing this for a long time without issues then what has changed?

    I doubt that the primers are oversized, lots of quality control checks would have to fail for that to happen. That leads me to believe crimped pockets on salvaged brass, sorry if I'm wrong. If I'm not try one of these, they work great.

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con...uper_Swage_600

    This piece of equipment doesn't uniform the pocket. It actually reshapes the radius and makes seating primers in crimmed brass a non issue. I have a few friends that pick up at the range. Most of the 308 brass that is left behind is surplus ammo and they have crimped pockets.
    This looks great, but the product burb reminds me why I don't have much Dillon stuff, "What's more it's inexpensive..." $96 is inexpensive to those folks! $20 is inexpensive to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    This looks great, but the product burb reminds me why I don't have much Dillon stuff, "What's more it's inexpensive..." $96 is inexpensive to those folks! $20 is inexpensive to me.
    I agree that the price blows. However, the guys that need it are getting their thrown away brass for free. Either pay $30-$60 bucks a bag for brass or buy a tool that will last a life time and fix free brass, either way we must pay to play.

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