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Thread: Corned Venison Recipe?

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    Default Corned Venison Recipe?

    A few weeks ago a member on the "Hunting Forum" posted a recipe for making Corned Beef/Venison. I have since looked back but have had no luck finding his post. Does anyone else remember that post or do you have a similar recipe?

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    As I recall most of us were using "Marylins" Recipe form the AOJ. It has worked great for me. Link here:http://www.alaskaoutdoorjournal.com/...rnedmoose.html

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    I don't recall the post you're referring to, but here's my related/similar(???) recipe.

    ----------------------
    Corned moose, bear, or other game meat; beef can be used too.

    10 quarts water in a large stainless steel stock pot big enough to put a dinner plate inside of as a weight to hold meat down.

    3 or 4 (3-lb) roasts, preferably uniform in dimension as the brine will work better if the thickness is relatively uniform throughout the roasts. I’ve found that the roasts should be no thicker than 2-½” or the brine won’t saturate uniformly in the centers of the roasts. That won’t really harm anything, other than the amount of time the meat in the center will last (in contrast to the meat that received better brine saturation), and the centers will lack as good of a flavor as the more brined areas of the meat too.)

    Brine:

    Add to your 10 quarts of water in a 20-22 qt stainless steel stock pot, or food-safe ceramic crock;

    15-18 cloves fresh garlic, chopped/pressed

    1+ cup sugar. (You can use a combination of brown and white sugar if you like; I use approximately 1-cup, (+/-), of brown sugar, and between 2 and 4 TBLSP of white sugar added to it. (You can also substitute maple syrup, etc.)

    15-18 bay leaves

    ¾-cup to 1-cup (+/-) pickling spices (if you wish you can use either regular or spicy, or a combination, which is what I do)

    2 ¼ cups canning and pickling salt (non-iodized)

    2 1/3 cups Morton’s Quick Tender or Tender Quick curing salt..

    Bring brine ingredients to boiling in stock pot by themselves, stirring early in the process, until salts and sugars are dissolved. - DO NOT BOIL MEAT AT THIS POINT!!!!-

    Remove stock pot with liquids and spices from stove top, and let cool. (In my biased opinion, your home now smells as good as it ever will! )

    When pot is room temperature, place in refrigerator to continue cooling.

    After stock pot liquid is cooled, place your 3 or 4 (3 lb.) roasts in the stock pot ( I use a 20-22 quart pot) with a good width to it.)

    Place a ceramic dinner plate inverted into liquid, over the meat, in order to hold it beneath the surface of the liquids, and return stock pot with roasts and brine to the refrigerator. Let soak in brine for 5-7 days.

    After 5-7 days of brining, discard the brine altogether, and place meat in stock pot for cooking with FRESH water sufficient to submerge the roasts, and leave enough water that with the evaporation of cooking, the meats remain submerged. You can also add water as it evaporates, as long as the meats were submerged at the start, and remain that way, for purposes of uniform cooking, and to prevent premature drying of the brined meats.. Boil until tender.

    Let cool and either eat with cabbage as a traditional meal, or slice for use on MOOSE RUBENS(!!!) with swiss cheese (preferably a good Jarlsberg), drained and pressed sauerkraut, extra-sour rye or sour dill rye bread, a touch of horse radish and mayonnaise.

    I put mayo and slight horseradish on the toasted bread slices, ample thinly-sliced meats on both pieces, (‘face up’ or ‘open faced’) drain the ‘kraut‘ by squeezing it in my hands over the sink, and place it in thin layers over the sliced meat on both halves, then put a decent layer of swiss cheese on both pieces over the top of the kraut, placing it open face under the broiler on cookie sheets until the swiss cheese just starts to turn golden brown in tiny spots, and the rest of the cheese is nicely melted.. MMMmmmmmm ---------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Thanks Ruf!
    I am going to try this week
    OTK

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    You're welcome.

    I played a bit with the original recipe I started with until I got it to where I liked it.

    Let me know what you think of the end product after it's done.

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    Ruffel is there any particular cut you prefer to use? i was thinking of the large Neck roasts when boning the nck meat out for corning..
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    Vince, I tend to use eye-of-round roast and sirloin tip roast with moose, both for jerky and for the corning. I even label the packages as such in the freezer. (i.e., "for jerking or corning" along with the meat I.D., "moose" "eye-of-round rst" etc.)

    Both cuts tend to be approximately the correct thickness and I'm able to easily cut them to the correct weights/other dimensions. Those cuts also tend to otherwise be used for burger, sausage, cube steak, stew meat, etc., as they're rarely tender enough to really enjoy eating as steaks without some sort of preparation beyond butchering.

    The steaks I keep for stir-fry or plain ol' frying and grilling are the top sirloin (most tender under-rated steak on almost any animal, and perhaps the most versatile as well). There's also the tenderloin. In most cases, I prefer a good moose top sirloin steak to a back-strap steak, in terms of tenderness and juiciness. The tenderloin's the only steak I prefer to a top sirloin on a moose. Backstrap is just a New York cut, and even on a beef they're lean, let alone on a moose, where they're 'uber-lean.'

    Probably more than you asked for. I'm likely known for that by now, I guess. ;^>)

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    I neglected to add, in my references to tender steaks on a moose, the one that can really frequently go either way, depending on the specific critter in question, is the top round. On a nice, clean-killed moose, I've had some top round steaks that were almost as tender as a premium top sirloin. I've also had top round steaks that I knew just from feeling them that they were destined for the grinder, cuber, etc..

    My meat cutter is a fine person A man I have a great deal of respect for. I've always told persons that if they have a compeent and honest doc, a good butcher, a good mechanic, and a good spouse, most of life's struggles just got turned down a bunch of notches. (A good pilot and a good dog or two fit in there some place too, of course.)

    I've taken my family's meat to this fellow now for about 20 years now; he cuts while I wrap, there's no high-grading, and you know it's your moose 'cause you brought it in, laid it on the table, and were there to do the work. Anyway, he taught me how to judge (or at least one fairly dependable method for judging) a steaks/piece of meat's degree of tenderness; lay it on your cutting board and try to push your fingers through it. If it gives way easily, and you can put your fingers through to the cutting board, or nearly so, it's a tender steak. Keep it as a premium piece of meat.

    Short of that, process it into something else.... like corned meat, jerky, stew, or burger/sausage.

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    it's always interesting to compare methods. our corning is quite basic, based on the Joy of Cooking recipe. I prefer the taste of corned caribou the best, but I do venison and moose often as well. usually we do at least 2 pound roasts, on up to 5 pounds.

    per hunk of meat:

    Approx. 1 gallon of water (less if you're doing several hunks, but you need enough to cover the meat in whatever brining container you will use, plus several inches on top)

    2c c-o-a-r-s-e salt (webfilter apparently had a problem with the word i spelled out)
    1/4c sugar / brown sugar combo
    2T pickling spice

    I forego any meat tenderizer / instacure because there's just no need for it.

    heat the above on the stove until all salt/sugar is dissolved. let it cool, pour over meat and add at least 3 cloves of garlic per hunk of meat. more can't hurt IMO.


    Then, our process differs from ruffles, as we allow it to brine in the fridge much longer, for at least 3 weeks, sometimes 4. The meat is turned every 5-7 days. Usually I am using the very tough meat that I would otherwise grind, primarily upper neck, brisket, and the hunks of hindquarter with lots of sinews in them, so i think the long brine really helps to tenderize these cuts. 3 weeks is good for the 2-3 pound cuts, the bigger ones need 4.

    Once corned, I usually cook at least one or two pieces "fresh" and pack the rest in sealed plastic with a bit of brine and freeze them. Often I'll cook one at three weeks before removing the rest from the brine, to see if it's done to my liking. If it's not "garlicy" enough, I'll wait another week.


    A common way I cook a corned roast is simply boiling, and then slicing for sandwiches, and as ruffle mentioned, horseradish is key!


    Another favorite, sometimes called New England Dinner:

    boil for a few hours (at least 2, longer makes it more tender)
    1 corned roast
    20 whole black peppercorns
    2-3 bay leaves

    once meat is tender to your liking, remove it (if you need space in the pot, or leave it in) and add to the remaining broth a combination of cut-up root veggies that you like.
    I prefer:

    rutabagas, 2# (4-5 small, or 2 large)
    white potatoes, 2# (Denali is by far the best variety)
    carrots, 1-2#
    parsnip, 1# one large or two small
    white onion, 1 large or a bunch of the little bite-sized ones.

    you will probably have to add additional water to the broth to cover all the veggies. don't add too much, things will cook down. if you're feeding a bunch of folks, then cram that pot full with veggies!

    boil the above for about 20-30 minutes, till the potatoes are nearing a texture you like.

    10 minutes before finished, cut a cabbage into 8 large wedges, and add to the pot. when the cabbage is soft for a fork, bon appetite.

    don't forget the mustard and horseradish on the side.



    going to go eat some leftovers right now.
    Last edited by andweav; 12-14-2010 at 18:36. Reason: grammar, web-filter

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    thanks andweav.. another to try... oh Ruffle? tough cuts = country fried steak.. twice through the cuber.. once then 90 degree turn and do it again... roll it in flour, egg dip and panco... and FRY BABY FRY!!!! nice helping of gravy and no more tough steaks ever!

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    Default Leftover corned venison

    really like using these enamel coated cast iron pots.
    NEdinner.jpg

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    Thanks, andweav. I think you're right about the attractiveness of having a variety of methods, or getting to see others' techniques and recipes.

    I initially used something very similar to the original recipe for which a link was posted in this thread, but I didn't like the 'bag method' for brining, and found that the salt issue could get outof hand with that technique.. Uncertainty about the plastic when mixed with a strong salt brine for a long period of time was a major factor in my thinking, though, whether well-founded or not...

    One of the reasons I (earlier) stated that I try to restrict the thickness of the roasts to 2-1/2" or 3" has to do with brine penetration into the roast. It's possible that this is also affected by the duration of the soaking and salt-to-water ratio, as well.

    My issue with soaking too long in a really salty brine has to do with not liking there to be too much saltiness in the finished product, though changing the water a couple times (or more) when boiling/cooking the meat, after the brining is completed, can also alleviate some of the excess salts. In some cases of extreme saltiness, we've changed the cooking water several times before getting it to where it was more edible.

    The 5-7 day soak in a (stainless steel) stock pot with the recipe I posted hasn't caused too many really salty baatches, but, as I reported earlier, if the roasts are too big (or too short in brining time?), there's oiften a small area in the center of the meat that is obviously a different color and texture, presumably due to the brine's not reaching there.

    I like the enamel-on-cast-iron stock pots, too. At the alternative school in the Yukon Territory in the '70s, we used a giant ceramic crock on a 'scooter' sort of board with casters. It was made for brining larger quantities of meats, may have held somewhere in the neighborhood of 15-20 gallons of liquid, and had an accompanying ceramic weight (like a huge discus) that held the meat below the liquid's surface for more thorough/even brining. We could do numerous large hams at once in that. I have no idea where it went when the school shut down in '79, but I liked that thing. Too big to be very practical for the home-owner, though, but that's where I got my idea for the brining method I employ with the stainless stock pot(s).
    ------------

    Vince, I do use a cuber, but not for sirloin tip, eye-of-round, or bottom round roasts; those are kept for jerking and corning. For cubing I tend to use the front shoulder roasts and brisket meat (though with really good beef I keep the brisket cut into two pieces for roasting all day in a dutch oven in barbecue sauce, 'til it falls apart, then serve either plain or on toasted buns with a sharp cheddar cheese.)

    I initially began using the game cutter I do because of a reference from a friend, shortly after 1990. The fellow has about 50 years of professional butchering experience, now being in his 60s (I think), and having started his 'time' in the butchering profession when he was about 10 or 11 years old, reportedly working next to his father, who was a butcher. He's got every piece of equipment one could need for a pro job, including larger grinders, mixers, cubers, band saw(s), belt-driven sharpeners, oodles of knives and hand saws, etc. And he's always been roughly half the cost per hanging weight lb. as anyone else, more honest than many, and rarely does anyone's meat unless they're standing there, 'cause they have to wrap their own meat (being charged more or less his cost on the wholesale/bulk paper). Which also affords them the opportunity to express custom requests for each cut of meat.

    I've butchered my own meat, and contended with some of it looking like what it's supposed to look like, while other portions looked like a herd of pygmy cannibals might've raided the cache, and I decided that for the minimal costs involved, and the opportunity to visit with some fine folks at least once a year (often more), it's worth it to me to take my stuff to this fellow. It's a tradition now, if not a ritual of sorts. We now frequently take sweet bread to them, made from our zuchinni, rhubarb, etc., when we go in the fall. It's as much a get-together for me, as a meat trip these days. Who else would want to visit with such a verbose and opinionated feller as myself?

    As I've grown more worried abouthis health (partly for selfish reasons, I'll admit), and as they've considered changes, I've told them that if they ever cease doing what they do, I'm screwed, as no one else does the quality of work they do, as honestly as they do it, for the cost they charge, and I don't want anyone else handling my family's meat. That, and I'm not in a position to purchase (or store) all of that fine equipment. I can tell a part of my history by the seasons through which I've taken both our game meat and farm critters to that fine gent, and sincerely hope he outlives us all..

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