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Thread: Retiring and Moving to Sterling

  1. #1

    Default Retiring and Moving to Sterling

    I'm fixing to retire in the next 18 months or so. My wife is from Sterling and her family has left her a house so that's were we are headed. I'm a life long hunter from the deep south. I know you have Moose,Caribou and bear. But what else is up there. I like small game and wing shooting. I have an '06,SxS 12ga,22LR and a 44 handgun. So figure i can cover a pretty wide variety. How is the hunting on the Penninsula? I was a military survival instructor for a few years before i moved to Search an Rescue. I spent about 2 months around Fairbanks in the winter, so i understand how dang cold it can get.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    the Pen is a different world from Fairbanks. You will not see anywhere near the level of wingshooting that you can get in the south. We have Ptarmigan but you have to get up high to get into them. A snow machine (local term for Snowmobile) is your best bet to get out in the winter and get into them. Grouse are pretty readily available but they are a challenging wing shot as the generally live in the forest and are sometimes unwilling to flush. We don't have grain crops so no pheasant or other upland birds. You are not likely to see action like a day of quail hunting. Snowshoe Hare are cyclical but when their numbers are up the hunting can be fantastic. The Kenai Pen is truly famous for the fishing with some amazing salmon runs and some of the biggest chinook in the world. Other than that you have Dall Sheep and Mountain Goat on the Pen and you can travel to get into Sitka Blacktail deer.

  3. #3
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    Wing shooting in Alaska???
    The usual excuses for a missed bird are:
    "It ducked just as I shot."
    "It jumped up to the next branch, just as I shot."
    "I thought it was gonna fly & shot over it."
    "The glare from the blacktop blinded me."


    Lots of duck hunting available, too.
    Gary

  4. #4
    Member Sterlingmike's Avatar
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    Lord willing, I'll still be here when you finally move in. PM me around that time and we can get together for a coffee, or something. Great place to live IMHO................

    Mike

  5. #5
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    You've got a proper battery of arms, and it seems the motivation and interest, you'll like it here in Hunters Heaven

    Spend your first "non res" year and follow along and get the hang of wherever you land.

    Have fun!!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  6. #6
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    Default K-pen outlook

    My opinion of the kenai peninsula is unless Fish and Game expands brown bear hunting so we can start shooting some brownies the caribou, moose, and sheep hunting on the k-pen will continue its downward trend. The moose population on the peninsula isn't half of what is was 20 years ago, and even in areas like 15C where there has been good burns and logging for the moose they're numbers are worse than they've been in at least 50 years if not more. Rabbits are good right now, but the population is only supposed to stay up for another couple years so by the time you get up here the rabbit hunting will be declining steadily until about 13 years or so down the road. There are some pheasants around ninilchik and homer, but most residents almost consider them pets so you might run into some hostile people if you start blastin the town birds.

  7. #7

    Default

    So what's the deal with bear on the "pen"? You don't have a bunch of transplanted Californians there do ya? I grew up jump shooting Roughed Grouse, that won't flush till you are almost standing on them. The Moose hunting is what's most on my mind. How much meat can you get out of those things. We are aloud 12 deer a year here. Season runs from mid Sept to mid Jan. But they only run 120 to maybe a huge 200 pounds. We can take hogs year around with no bag limit if your on private property. So i get to pack in lots of meat. Plus i have a 2 acre garden. So my grocery bill is pretty small. If my property was zone for it, i would have cow too.


    Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.
    Thomas Jefferson



    Read more: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/au...#ixzz17iLRiBaF

  8. #8
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    Default Idaho

    Your close but actually the head biologist is from Idaho and just doesn't seem to be able to grasp the dynamics of peninsula wildlife. In Idaho there aren't very many brown bears or moose, so even though the moose pop. on the kenai is half or a third of what it used to be he still thinks there are a lot of them. Its a shame moose hunting on the peninsula about 15 years ago when I first started hunting was awesome, you could drive down logging roads and just along the main highway and see all kinds of moose and lots of small spike/fork and paddled bulls. Now you can drive down logging roads and most days not hardly see a moose, when you used to be able to drive these roads and usually guaranteed to see anywhere from 5 to 10 moose at morning or night and some days you would see even more than this. It's getting more and more rare to see the young paddled bulls that you used to be able to see ( now that's not a bear problem but more of a hunter problem).
    What I will blame on the bears are the current calf to cow ratios, they are pitiful and with the ratios there are right now there is no way to have a stable to growing moose population. Right now all units across the peninsula have calf to cow ratios is in the low teens, when looking at old aerial surveys they used to be high 20s up to in the 40s for calves per 100 cows. Even in areas with good moose habitat the ratios still stink.
    As far as moose weights go a big bull in the 50 inch class will net you about 3 times the meat or more, than a small spike/fork bull, and on a spike/fork bull you will get around 250 pounds of meat with the bone still in it. A big bull will likely get you 600 or better.

  9. #9
    Member Bigrob's Avatar
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    Default

    I live in Sterling also. You can get a small game license for $25 bucks and hunt grouse and hare until you meet residency requirements. It will also give you a good chance to get out and see the country.

  10. #10

    Default

    I've tried reading your reg's. WOW..... there is a lot to take in. Down here we just give up 30 bucks and that covers Bear,Hog,Deer and small game. Some counties have point restrictions and some don't allow Bear hunting. But you guys are cut and sliced all over the place. I get that some places only let you take Brown Bear every couple years and you only get one moose. Are these all draw hunts or can you get tags over the counter like down here?

  11. #11
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    CREW, your right. about the reg book. At least you'll have a year to become a resident and study and ask advice. Some units allow 1 Brown/grizzly each year while others there's a 4 year wait in between. Lots of hunts are over the counter while some are draw. A $25.00 tag is needed for B/G but all others are free for residents. I live in Soldotna just 10 miles from Sterling. PM for more info. Good luck with your plans and Merry Christmas.

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