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Thread: Max trailer towing speed?

  1. #1
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
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    Default Max trailer towing speed?

    I just took the CG Aux boating safety class and in the chapter about towing noticed that it lists the max speed for towing as 55 mph.
    I was never aware that there's a separate speed limit, and for the most cases stick to the posted speed limits when towing.
    The interesting thing is that today I tried to do a little research on this and in several places it lists Alaska's trailer towing speed limit as 45 mph (example here http://www.campinglife.com/output.cfm?ID=1047259).It does say that this is info from 2006, but the weird part is that the book says it's from 2006 as well.
    Does anyone know for sure what the speed limit for towing is in our state?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by russiarulez View Post
    I just took the CG Aux boating safety class and in the chapter about towing noticed that it lists the max speed for towing as 55 mph.
    I was never aware that there's a separate speed limit, and for the most cases stick to the posted speed limits when towing.
    The interesting thing is that today I tried to do a little research on this and in several places it lists Alaska's trailer towing speed limit as 45 mph (example here http://www.campinglife.com/output.cfm?ID=1047259).It does say that this is info from 2006, but the weird part is that the book says it's from 2006 as well.
    Does anyone know for sure what the speed limit for towing is in our state?
    I have never heard of a max speed when towing in Alaska that is different than the normal posted speed limit. There are special speed limits I have seen in other states, but not Alaska. I would be curious to find out if you hear anything.

    EDIT - Here is all I could find and it appears to only apply to vehicles towing a mobile home (such as a tow truck, not necessarily a 5th wheel type setup or even a motorhome from what I can tell). Limit for that is 45mph.
    http://www.touchngo.com/lglcntr/akst...section325.htm

  3. #3

    Default Got pulled over...

    Interesting; I got pulled over once for going to slow, (I was going about 60+ in a 65 zone), they said I was impeding traffic. I told them "no problem, thanks for being out here and keeping us safe."

    What I didn't say was "sorry but I didn't want to slam into the guy in front of me"! A guy had just pulled off at Girdwood who was draggin'-***** from Whittier stackin' us up, so I got the warning. My goofy father also waved at a trooper who was sitting along the road, they probably thought we were drunk when he did that. Welcome to the Seward Highway!

  4. #4
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Depends on size of trailer and load. On the over size load permit it will state 50 miles per hour and can also depend on posted road conditions.

  5. #5
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I just checked my oversize permit from last year, and it says nothing about speed limits. Here are the conditions listed. This is not to say there is not a restriction in the law somewhere, but it is not on the permit. Just this winter I noticed the restriction about stopping at all weight stations (oops).


    CONDITIONS
    Applicant expressly agrees to indemnify, save harmless, and defend the State of Alaska, its agencies and employees from any and all claims or actions for
    injuries or damages sustained by any person or property arising directly or indirectly from this special use permit or the activities which it authorizes.
    Applicant also acknowledges that, under Alaska Statue 44.80.070, the State is not subject to legal action or recovery of damages for injury arising out of,
    or in any manner connected with, this special use permit or the activities which it authorizes.
    Applicant certifies that the information stated above is correct and the company and its driver will comply with the conditions set forth in this permit. Failure
    to comply may result in a citation and may jeopardize the applicant's ability to use the on-line permit system in the future.
    Requests for refunds can be submitted no later than close of business on the start date.
    Permission is hereby granted to make the above movement, subject to restrictions & conditions stated above & all other applicable State laws & regulations.
    1. Driver must be able to produce copy of permit upon request and MUST STOP AT ALL OPEN WEIGH STATIONS.
    2. All vehicles with permits are required to stop at all open Weigh Stations even if they receive a green light from their transponder.
    3. No movement permitted if vision is restricted to less than 1000 by inclement weather. HEADLIGHTS MUST BE ON AT ALL TIMES.
    4. Maximum highway speed is the posted speed, subject to seasonal restrictions.
    5. Overall width of tractor or truck shall not exceed 8'6".
    6. Actual weight shall not exceed the MOST RESTRICTIVE (including seasonal) legal weight limits. See Current Weight Restrictions.
    7. Time of movement is daylight hours.
    8. May also travel during hours of darkness following all requirements specified in FMCSR 49 CFR PARTS 383-399, 571 and AAC Title 13 Part 1
    Chapters 3,4. Attachment HD
    In addition, extended light bar must be mounted on the rear of the overhang such that it is between 2' and 6' above the roadway. The extended light
    bar shall have tail lights, stop lights, and turn lights placed on the light bar such that the extreme lights are at least 4' apart.
    9. No Movement during designated holidays. See Attachment HR.
    10. Must have clearly readable OVERSIZE signs on the front and rear.
    11. Red or fluorescent orange flag (16" square) on end of overhang.
    12. DO NOT TRAVEL UNDER ANY OVERHEAD STRUCTURE POSTED AT LESS THAN 15' IN HEIGHT.

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  6. #6
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    If it said 100mph would you go that fast??? Just use your head and go slower than the limit and be safe.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I've played with speeds, roads conditions etc with my rig set up. My comfortable towing speed is 60 MPH. My load rides well, I can stop in a reasonable time giving me the feeling that I'm in control. I can tell if I am going faster than 65 without looking at my speedometer as the rig let me know. I am close to being maxed out with towing capacity and I use a Equalizer Weight Distribution Towing System is made specifically for surge brakes which it is professionally set up and, tuned to my rig. As far as backing up traffic by not following the speedlimit. Its not an issue if you pay attention to traffic, and get over or pull over if needed.

  8. #8

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    remember if you have a small boat trailer tire it is going really fast when you are going 65mph i tow my bayliner 2556 i would say in the 10k range over all around 55-65 with a dodge diesel truck i also have a weight distributing hitch on mine as well. a little more on that is most of them will work with surge brakes as long as they are the chain type so the brakes can get put one, also you need a surge coupling that is rated to 2 times your trailer weight to use the WDH. that said if i got any bigger boat i think i would make the trailer gooseneck.

  9. #9
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I don't believe WD systems with chains work properly with surge brakes. Mine.has slider bars. Look up Equalizer WD
    Quote Originally Posted by rmk4x4 View Post
    remember if you have a small boat trailer tire it is going really fast when you are going 65mph i tow my bayliner 2556 i would say in the 10k range over all around 55-65 with a dodge diesel truck i also have a weight distributing hitch on mine as well. a little more on that is most of them will work with surge brakes as long as they are the chain type so the brakes can get put one, also you need a surge coupling that is rated to 2 times your trailer weight to use the WDH. that said if i got any bigger boat i think i would make the trailer gooseneck.

  10. #10

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    i have had both and i like the chains better i have 20k coupling and in the manual it shows setting it up with a chain setup. i like it works well i can stop on a dime my setup. the chains have to be long enough to allow the coupling to move. if the hitch allows the coupling to move the brakes will work fine no matter if it is a chain or a bar connecting it


    http://www.eagletrailer.com/Manuals/...Model-DA20.pdf on page 5

  11. #11

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    There's the following clauses from Alaska's Administrative Permit Manual: Oversize and Overweight Permits (so for trailered loads requiring a permit)...

    6.3 Over 12 in width but not exceeding 14:
    6.3.3 Maximum highway speed is 45 MPH on all routes, unless otherwise noted on the permit

    and

    6.4 Over 14 in width:
    6.4.3 Maximum highway speed is 35 MPH on all routes unless otherwise noted on the permit

    There are some more restrictions depending on height, weight and whether the load is being towed during "Hours of Darkness"

  12. #12
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
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    The only thing I could find in Alaska Statues and Regulations is "Towing Mobile Home at Speed Over 45 MPH". $75 Bail, 2 points (AAC 02.325(b)).

  13. #13
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    Unless you like wasting a heck of a lot of fuel, why would anyone want to go over 55 while pulling a big boat? Many times we just crawl along at 50-55 the entire drive to Homer.
    Kind of ironic when you pull up to the first red light in Soldotna only to see the car in front of you that passed you before you got to Girdwood.

    Relax, drive slow, reduce the stress and save the fuel.
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  14. #14
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    why would anyone want to go over 55 while pulling a big boat?
    55 may be fast enough, but when you start talking about 50 or 45 mph, or any speed slower than the speed of traffic one of my concerns is impeding the flow of traffic. This is not so much a concern because I care about others time and schedule, but for my own safety. The worse case is when you get a underpowered car trying to pass a long truck and trailer setup, they can put you at risk for being involved in a head on collision. Driving a bit faster can make it where others are more willing to wait and not make a marginal pass.
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    55 may be fast enough, but when you start talking about 50 or 45 mph, or any speed slower than the speed of traffic one of my concerns is impeding the flow of traffic. This is not so much a concern because I care about others time and schedule, but for my own safety. The worse case is when you get a underpowered car trying to pass a long truck and trailer setup, they can put you at risk for being involved in a head on collision. Driving a bit faster can make it where others are more willing to wait and not make a marginal pass.
    Well said, plus the OP did not say anything about the size of what he was towing. Towing could apply to any size trailer, down to a small flatbed snowmachine trailer which wouldn't cause you the fuel economy concerns a large boat or enclosed trailer might.

    I have no problem with those who feel it is safer to tow at slower speeds as long as they have no problem taking advantage of the pullouts and passing zones on the road.

  16. #16

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    Good thread, you all have good points. I tend to worry about who is driving behind me when hauling a load. My experience has been that if i keep it a couple mile below the posted speed, most of the drivers wont pass me when given the oppertunity. The ones that feel they can't handle a couple miles under usually stay towards the left side of the lane. When i observe this i don't hesitate to allow them safe passage.

  17. #17
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
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    I started this thread simply because I was surprised that there was some kind of a speed restriction, and just wanted to know the actual law on this.
    I tow everything from small trailers to larger ocean boats and my speed varies accordingly to a lot of factors, I wasn't looking for advice on saving gas here, just wanted to know if there's an actual restriction.

  18. #18
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    4. Maximum highway speed is the posted speed, subject to seasonal restrictions.
    According to jrogers permit looks like the question was answered?

  19. #19
    Member pacific23's Avatar
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    If you have " ST rated tires" your MAX speed is 65 MPH , check the side wall of your tire.

    Also if you run a Ford F550 check your side wall , I believe it's 80 MPH MAX

    Most people don't know what their tires are rated at , ya might want to check your stuff before you hit the road.

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