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Thread: Angled vs. Straight Spotting Scope?

  1. #1
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    Question Angled vs. Straight Spotting Scope?

    I am looking into buying a new spotting scope and I am trying to decide on an angled or straight eyepiece. From the previous posts it seems that the angled eyepiece is more comfortable to use. I am currently leaning towards the angled eyepiece. However, I am concerned that an angled eyepiece would be more likely to collect rain drops or snow. I am also concerned that the angled eyepiece would be more likely damaged in a pack. Are these valid concerns? What would you recommend if I will be using this scope strictly for hunting with equal time spent viewing uphill, downhill, and level?

    Thank You,

    NJF

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    well, ya it'll get rain on it, i just stick my cap on when i'm not looking, i haven't been concered with damaging mine in my pack, i don't carry it like eggs but i also don't treat it like i have six more at home. try to take care of my gear best i can. after starting my guiding wiht a straight tube then getting an angled its night and day. angled for me all the way.
    if your getting a spotter just to see if the ram is legal of the brow tines are there, straights fine. but if you plan on doing any scanning or long term looking i'd go angled.
    but its personal preference...
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    Personal preference for sure. I like straight.

    I've heard a lot of folks advise straight for hunting and angled for the bench. i'm not a bench rester, but can see how angled would be more convenient there. When I do shoot from the bench at the range, it's usually single shots and taking the time to look through the spotter, keeping the barrel cool.

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    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    I also used a straight scope for a long time, then went to an angled Leica. Not that I would ever have to buy another scope, but I would never go back to a straight one. I use mine in the field sometimes 90 or so days a year for uphill, downhill, level, whatever.

  5. #5

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    I go for angled because of the short tripod I carry, or worse yet when I don't carry a tripod and simply lay it over my pack. I can spend a lot more time viewing through the angled than the straight, and usually that extra time at the eyepiece produces extra game.

  6. #6
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Default Recommendations?

    Great info here. I've been looking in cabela's for a spotting scope, and was wondering the same thing on the angled or straight.

    Can any of you recommend a power and/or specific brand and model you would recommend?

    There are so many, I don't even know where to begin.

    Any help would be appreciated.

  7. #7

    Question Weight savings

    Just thought I'd throw this out there, I havent done the math yet but it seems an angled without a tripop (resting on a pack), is lighter than straight with a tripod. If weight is an issue.

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    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    You're right about the weight using the angled without a tripod. I've used the angled scope without tripod on personal hunts, but never when I was guiding someone.
    When it comes to brand, it's a matter of how much you can afford. I could afford to spend over $1000 because I use it for guiding. I need the best I can get. When it comes to the power I think a variable 20-60 is best for all around purposes, but the size of the objective lense will dictate how much power you can realistically use. A 60 mm objective lense on most scopes will limit the amount of magnification you can use. From what I've seen the most you can expect to use from a 60 mm is about 40 power. The higher end optics will no doubt make a difference.
    The best thing to do if you are able to do it is to choose a price range and compare different scopes within your price range side by side at a store somewhere.

  9. #9

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    I have owned quite a few different spotters over the years and currently own a Leica Televid 62 and I dig it. Started with a really cheap Bushnell about 12 years ago and over the years upgraded a little more each time until I could afford my current Leica. The one thing that is constant is that I cant like the angled spotters. IMO to effectively use a good spotter you need a solid platform (tripod) and there are lots of quality super lightweight tripods out there and they are not all 13" high. But it all depends on what is particularly comfortable to you.

  10. #10
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    I've owned two scopes. Bushnell 15X45 60 mm and Leica Televid 77 mm. Apples to oranges. I love oranges.

  11. #11
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    I used straight spotters for years. The last Leica I bought was an angled spotting scope...won't do it again. My preference if for a straight...but most of my hunting is mountain hunting for sheep. I had my doubts before making my last purchase...now I know, straight is best for me and the type of hunting I do.

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    Thumbs up budget determines quality, you get what you pay for

    i prefer straight.

    i have and use a swarovski st 80 20-60x 80mm, straight. never looked back.

    as for recomendations. how much is your price range?

    scopes i would look at;

    leupold

    nikon

    leica

    swarovski

  13. #13
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Default price range

    Would like to keep the price range in the $500 to $1000, but would go higher if it's worth the money.

    Missed out on a nice 55" 4 brow bull last year because I didn't have good enough optics to pick out the 4th tine, and I have heck judging inches. 3X9 leo wasn't enough. Had him at 75 yards.

    Camp next to us got him the next morning...

  14. #14

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    denalihunter , you need to get with Doug from Cameraland in the optics section of the forum. He has a multitude of spotters at better prices than anyone else you'll find. He takes good care of you and will help you with your decision.

  15. #15
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    Default spotting scopes

    I like angled better for laying low and spotting game from the prone.(easier on the neck)

    straight is better standing from a tall tripod or sitting at the bench or sitting on a stool or rock with a medium tripod.

    Just my opinion.

    jedi.

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    I tried angled and could not stand it. Had a heck of a time trying to get the scope pointed towards what I wanted to see.
    Tennessee

  17. #17
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
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    Default Angled...

    No matter how I dangle, I use the angle! Most higher end scopes allow you to rotate the eyepiece or neck, therefore, you can 45 degree your viewing while in a prone position. When glassing for longer periods, I like to sit on top comfortably. I like the angled, for like I said, whatever the dangle, you can find your angle!
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  18. #18
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    I have used angled Leupolds for years and do not think I could ever get comfortable with a straight tube.

    Doug

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