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Thread: Drift Weights

  1. #1
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    Default Drift Weights

    I know the necessary weight will vary from river to river and with the water levels, but can I get some kind of general idea.

    I fish a variety of rivers here in Michigan with a spinning rod, bouncing spawn and flys, and ususally can get a light bounce with anything from a 1/4 ounce in light water, to 3/4 ounce in our bigger water, the most I have had to use is 5/8.

    I would think that would be consistant there with the smaller streams, but how about the Kenai, both upper and lower as well as the Russian both Upper and lower.

  2. #2

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    You'll be fine on the Russian with the lighter end of the weights you've mentioned. The Kenai, thats a whole nuther thing...depending on where you are on the river and water levels which will determine current flows. I'd be prepared to use weights up to 1.5 ounces or so on the high end, especially flipping for reds. Mono to 25 lb. test isn't overkill in crowded "combat" situations, tho hopefully you can fish areas that allow for somewhat lighter gear. If you're fortunale enough to hit it at a time when the Russian is holding fish (not just at the confluence, where combat fishing rules) you can drop down to 10 lb line and lighter weights and have a ton of fun with the reds (and bows). Good luck!

  3. #3

    Default weights for kings

    If you're backbouncing eggs for kings on the Kenai you'll want to use at least 8oz. If you're fishing the beaver creek hole the last 10 days you'll need 10oz. MN Man is correct about the weights for flipping for reds.

  4. #4
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    Default

    For Reds I typically use between 3/8-3/4 oz. The most I have ever used was 7/8 oz.

  5. #5

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    TCman, pretty sure he's talking about wade/shore fishing, not backbouncing from a boat. For sure there are spots on the Kenai where less than an ounce will do fine, but there are also (good) spots where you just aren't going to hit bottom without more weight.

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    If you're backbouncing eggs for kings on the Kenai you'll want to use at least 8oz. If you're fishing the beaver creek hole the last 10 days you'll need 10oz. MN Man is correct about the weights for flipping for reds
    We will have access to a power boat to fish the lower Kenai and will most likely be backbouncing eggs for kings as well, but I would never have imagined 8 or 10 ounces.....how deep is the water.

    As for the rest, it's a little heavier then I am used to, but not extreme, thanks for the heads up.

  7. #7

    Default bouncing

    When you're bouncing in the lower river you'll be fishing in about 10-20 feet.
    The reason for the heavy weight is two fold. You'll be in a current that will average 7mph, and you'll be fishing around a lot of boats and you'll need to keep your rig close to the boat. You could fish lighter than 8-10oz but you'll get spooled on the prop below you and that is no fun. Fish heavy for kings, it's the etiquette on the river.

  8. #8
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    When you're bouncing in the lower river you'll be fishing in about 10-20 feet.
    The reason for the heavy weight is two fold. You'll be in a current that will average 7mph, and you'll be fishing around a lot of boats and you'll need to keep your rig close to the boat. You could fish lighter than 8-10oz but you'll get spooled on the prop below you and that is no fun. Fish heavy for kings, it's the etiquette on the river.
    The St. Joseph runs about like that, but runs 3-15 feet or so on average. The boating sounds real different. Would not imagine anchoring within a couple hundred yards below an anchored boat.

    We put hardware back maybe 60-120 feet and I have walked back, well I had on 150 yards of main line and was into my backing a couple of times.

    Thats a fairly large river also, must be a hoop of boats out there.

  9. #9
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    Sounds like someone will be in for a bit of a surprise

    120 feet back will mean you'll be under the third or fourth boat back when fishing the Beav

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    Sounds like someone will be in for a bit of a surprise
    Starting early to minimize those surprises.

    Going to Youtube to look up videos of fishing on the Kenai.

  11. #11
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    We fished the Kenai for the first time on our own last july and yes you will need 8-10-12 ounce weights and if you have any inexperienced anglers on board I would use as much as a pound depending on the tide. Like earlier replies sometimes your motor is literally less than a foot from the bow of the boat behing you. I would suggest playing on the river during "off peak" times! We spent about 8 hours just learning the currents, playing with the jets and weights, learning the tides and working on "set" distance! Ended up going 9 for 12 during a 5 day span of power boating and spent the first day and a half not fishing effectively. This was during a seven day low fish count in the month of July. Bring your steelie roe with you is the biggest suggestion I can offer. If the Kings are slow getting quality eggs can be next to impossible!! We were able to catch a fresh female at the end of the second day and eggs were no longer a problem! That saved the trip.

    That being said, if anyone could offer any jet tips I would be all ears as we had no success whatsoever with them and ended up hitting the bottom and/or tangling them constantly. I am a charter captain on Lake Erie and have used them extensively so I do understand the dive curves and the premise.

  12. #12

    Default kenai regs

    Make sure you're familiar with the fishing regs on the Kenai. One of the many surprises you'll find is that you're not allowed to anchor in the boating/fishing channels until August. Also, you'll want to pay attention on the water and fish the way others are. What I mean by this is you don't want to be drift fishing where the backtrollers are set up and vice versa. Not following etiquette will get you quite a few stares and conversations that have nothing to do with the weather.

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