Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Arctic Oven tents

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    28

    Default Arctic Oven tents

    Greetings,

    I've recently found the AO tent collection, which allows a wood stove inside the tent so it can be used all year round. This is the webpage im talking about; http://www.alaskatent.com/.

    Can someone give me their opinion on these tents. Experience with the weight, camping and quality will be very appreciated!

    Survivalist Out

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    For year round use I would go w/ a canvas wall tent. For a dedicated winter tent the Arctic Oven is about the best there is. I just don't find them that well suited for summer use.

  3. #3
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    For year round use I would go w/ a canvas wall tent. For a dedicated winter tent the Arctic Oven is about the best there is. I just don't find them that well suited for summer use.
    I talked with the folks at alaska tent and tarp just a few weeks ago. They summed it up just like Lu-jon.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Ok, thanks, good to know! I'm gonna look into the canvas wall tents as well! See which one got the upper hand.

    Survivalist.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Survivalist View Post
    Greetings,

    I've recently found the AO tent collection, which allows a wood stove inside the tent so it can be used all year round. This is the webpage im talking about; http://www.alaskatent.com/.

    Can someone give me their opinion on these tents. Experience with the weight, camping and quality will be very appreciated!

    Survivalist Out

    The Arctic Oven tents are near top of the line... both fabrication and design.

    Story for concept with basic geometry is not truly exclusive. Once upon a time --- Eureka made a base camp tent to meet requirements for an American led expedition/climb on Mount K2. This is some 30+ years ago! The original tent was made of nylon, 4-poles of non-anodized aluminum, and all hardware was metal. Demands were #1 dummy-proof sturdy SIMPLICITY with ease of entry/exit in all extreme conditions (meaning dealing with high altitude, cold, wind, snow, wet, running camp stoves, having roominess for a party. The tent was also built very tough and made to last 20+ years!!!

    Progression from this basic platform for Alaskan adoption/adaption was sucessfully marketed (mostly up here to guides/outfitters at first) by Barney's. This was also sewn by Eureka Tents and at first was available in 8X8 just like the early mountaineering version. The tent was called the Overlander Expedition, but later became better renowned as the Bombshelter. These early versions with one entry are quite a bit lighter than those most owners of presently owned to newer model Bombshelters would be accustomed to hauling around.

    Since that time the Bomshelter has had makeovers of sorts and even changed hands/continents on workmanship, however overall high-quality and design remains much the same.

    There have been poorly made knock-offs over the years by the tail end of Garry King Store days here in Anchorage and by Cabellas... these tents were junk, sewn like crap, using sub-par materials, and performed like less than the best in extreme conditions when compared with the highest-quality Barney's Bombshelters.

    Now enters Alaska Tent & Tarp with a new winterizing extreme fabrication on the simple and reliable platform. This tent is different!!! The aspect to most consider on the AO tents is the departure from a summer-mode shelter. Why purchase one... or 2? The HIGH-CARD answers are A.) SIMPLICITY, B.) RUGGED DEPENDABILITY, C.) ROOMINESS, D.) EASE OF ENTRY/EXIT. with your PRIORITIES being 1.) STOVE HEATING CAPABILITY, 2.) BREATH ABILITY W/OUT FROST BUILD-UP ON INNER TENT, 3.) MADE COMPREHENSIVELY HERE IN ALASKA BY EXCELLENT COMPANY AND CUSTOMER SERVICE TO WORK WITH 1 on 1!!!

    Having the options for all-around, year-round uses here in Alaska? A no-brainer... if you can afford the best - it's an Arctic Oven over a wall tent or the rest any time, any place!!!

  6. #6

    Default

    Davis Tent of Denver Colorado. Very well made canvas wall tent with a cylinder stove and sturdy cots. 14 by 16 size, comfortably housing 3 guys plus a table and chairs with the ability to dry clothingDSCN1161.jpg at night.

    **Hint for nightime** Put the largest rock you can lift upon the woodstove, it's warm in the morning well after the stove has burned out.

    DSCN1105.jpg



    Each tent style has pros and cons. Wall tents excel when weight is not an issue. I find wall tents to be durable, roomy and will tolerate 50 mph winds if properly staked. Good four season tent but not for back packing. This outfit with poles, ropes and canvas weighs 100 lbs. plus 70 lbs for the stove. I can hold 70 degrees inside with -10 outside. Hunting elk in the lower 48 with anything but a wall tent just seems stange to me.

    I sure do like that Hilleberg Saivo for a back pack tent....
    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

  7. #7
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ex1811 View Post
    Davis Tent of Denver Colorado. Very well made canvas wall tent with a cylinder stove and sturdy cots. 14 by 16 size, comfortably housing 3 guys plus a table and chairs with the ability to dry clothingDSCN1161.jpg at night.

    **Hint for nightime** Put the largest rock you can lift upon the woodstove, it's warm in the morning well after the stove has burned out.

    DSCN1105.jpg
    Good looking tent and your rock idea is a winner. I have a 10 X 16 Nylon tent thats great in the summer, but have really been thinking canvas for fall and winter hunting etc. Looks good. Dang, now my wish list just got bigger!
    LOL
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    For year round use I would go w/ a canvas wall tent. For a dedicated winter tent the Arctic Oven is about the best there is. I just don't find them that well suited for summer use.
    I have been looking at getting an AO. Why don't you find them suited for summer use? Do they not deal with rain well?

  9. #9
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    The biggest thing the lady at AO told me was that rain will leak at the stove jack. They didnt have a solution for it other than stuffing the hole with something.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    The biggest thing the lady at AO told me was that rain will leak at the stove jack. They didnt have a solution for it other than stuffing the hole with something.
    That doesnt sound to professional, especially when you look at the price their asking for such tent. Where does the leaking accur mainly?, and is this problem easily to fix with just some ducktape/stuffing? I'm not really into the whole 'wake-up wet and cold' situation, so i need to be sure this can be fixed properly.

    Thanks for the notice,

    Survivalist.

  11. #11
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    The rain fly has a square piece of matching material that velcros over the hole for the pipe. I imagine moisture can build up on the inside of the fly and drip thru the pipe hole in the tent body. Can't see the hole actually leaking since it is a raised rubber grommet and water shouldn't be able to run up over the lip and thru the hole hence the suggestion to simply stuff something into the hole to keep the drips out. The oven is a really warm tent and is the reason for a lot of folks to dislike it for anything but winter use.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    161

    Default

    The stove jack leaking I can understand. My current wall tent came with a roof penetration stove jack and I converted it into a wall penetration stove jack for that reason. Both wall tents I have used had issues with stove pipes in the roof and so now they go out the side. That might be a fixable issue on the AO. Hmmm... I will give them a call. Also when I asked about summer use. I was considering more spring and fall use where rain is an issue or a real rainy summer where it is 40-50 *F during the night and a wood or oil stove really helps with wet children and a happy wife.

    Thanks for the info.

  13. #13
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    I have been using a AO 10 X 10 for the last three years, I primarily bought the tent for winter use, but I have used it for September hunting as well.

    I have used the tent in some minus 30 (F) weather and find it very comfortable for 2 men, we use the cots that Tent & tarp sell and they are good quality also, with the tent you need some ground cover and a floor lining. The floor lining is heavy canvas and protects the floor from burns if you are using the wood stove and helps to keep the cot legs from poking through the fkoor. This can be a problem if you are setting the tent up in the winter on top of some existing snow pak.

    The woodstove can make it very comfortable in the coldest weather, I have used wood, charcoal and found Duralogs to work the best for short trips (7-10 days), they really do last a long time, the stove is quite small and I have found the duralogs will last almost all night.

    I never had any issues with leks around the chimney exit? However I have not used the tent during the time of year when raining, snow accumulation could cause a similar issue? But not from my experience. I guess I dont expect it to be perfect, its a tent afterall.

    I have used it in some very windy conditions and it is tuff, last spring we got blown off the north slope when some winds came up (40mph), it happened in the morning so we were able to cope. If it had happened at night all we could have done is collapse the tent on top of us and let it blow. We had one tent pole break in that blow.

    If you plan to use the tent in windy conditons it has to be tied down, the skirt of the fly has to be stretched out and staked to hopefully prevent the wind from getting under the tent. We typically pull the skirt out (which is quite long) and pulll snow on top, however in a blow the snow will get blown away, once the wind gets under the tent, your in for a fight. Staking the tent in the winter can be diffucult. I have found T&T's tent stake to be amazingly durable, also because the tent is so tall I would recomend tying some type of a "guy" to the upper corners to help it endure the wind.

    As Lujon pointed out I wouldnt consider this a all-season tent, way too heavy and minimal ventilation and or screended windows to see out, plenty of other cheaper tents that suffice for that, in fact I would probaly not recomend the AO except for winter use when you need heat.

    The 10 is ok for 2 guys for a 7-10 days IMO, if one was planning a longer outdoor stay I would want a bigger tent, consider 2 wall tents, one inside the other. the AO is nice because it has a floor, poles and a reday to go package.

    Hope this helps, John
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  14. #14

    Default

    Maybe I haven't stayed in enough tents to know teh difference, but the only time I don't use my AO Arktika is when space or weight is an issue. I've probably used it all 12 months out of the year and we had it set up for over a month one summer when we had a lot of out of town visitors to stay in. We take ours moose hunting every year. 2 or 3 years ago the only time it stopped raining was when it was snowing, and we never had any issues with water inside the tent. I really like ours (so does my wife) but like anything, there isn't one tent that will do it all...that's why I own 4.

  15. #15
    Member Fishhunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Completely agree. I use mine all season unless weight is an issue. They are the best heavy weather tent made. I have used wall tents and they just don't compare. It is completely underrated to be able to place things up against the walls of the tent and not worry about the condensation soaking them over night. Also the light white inner fabric does not require much light at night to really light it up. AKgramps is also right about them needing to being sturdy in the wind with the proper staking. I have had AO10 tall in 40+knots of wind and my tent was nice and cozy while the other guys in camp were getting their tails kicked in there wall tent. I also use a little buddy heater to heat mine most of the time instead of dealing with the woodstove. I carry a portable battery operated Carbon monoxide alarm as a precaution and never run the heater when I am sleeping. But I can reach over; while still in my sleeping bag and start that little buddy in the morning and it will be more than comfortable in less than five minutes for getting up and getting dressed. The AO's are heavy though and I only take mine when I am on some kind of motorized vehicle.
    The wall tent does have a few advantages though in my opinion : They can be bigger if you need more space and I was never worried about hurting it, they just seem like they can take a beating. I am not saying the AO aren't durable, I just find myself being much more meticulous and cautious because of how nice the AO is. Whenever I used a wall tent I would just tramp in and out of the wall tent with my boots on and never really worry about the tent. The wall tent is probably more utilitarian for a hunting camp but the AO is a luxury and an upgrade nearly everywhere else.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Thanks for the information. You're taking about this buddy heater, and i've been looking for some information about this heater, and im very positive at this moment. Mainly because the weight. The one thing im not so sure about is how long this heater works on one tank, and how many propane gas tanks i need for lets say a half a year outdoors? The big advance of the woodstove is its ability to keep it going with just wood, which will be all around. But im sure the stove will weight much more then the little buddy heater, so ill be researching some more about those two options!

    Survivalist

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Just buy a small titanimum stove and be done with it. Unlike most wood stoves, you can burn wood, coal, charcoal, even fat in it and it will never rust or burn out. Plus they are light.
    Tennessee

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Snowwolfe, can you recommend a good titanium stove like you mentioned?

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bedrock, Alaska
    Posts
    87

    Default

    That suggestion of getting a wall tent for summer use is good, as long as the wall tent has a floor. Summertime in Alaska is big-time BUG-time.

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I'm curious why Alaska Tarp & Tent uses single-fill cotton fabric for their wall tents instead of the double-fill (except the Vapex model and the 13 oz. DLX Sunforger model), the latter (double fill) being pretty much the industry standard used by almost every notable wall tent company.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •