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Thread: Scope on a .480 ruger or a handgun in general?????

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    Default Scope on a .480 ruger or a handgun in general?????

    I've got a .480 Ruger (Raging Bull) I love to shoot (except for the price OUCH!!!)

    I shoot it with iron sights and at 25 yards I can drive tacks but at 50 well.....

    I'd like to deer hunt with this down in the lower 48

    I also have a 1x Burris Fullfield scope with heavy duplex reticles

    I've never scoped a pistol

    Would this combo be worth trying?

    Scope is just marked Burris 1x Fullfield but it seems to be a LER scope. Holding it at arms length I can pick up the cross hairs fairly well/quickly

    Are the rail mounts on these pistols fairly stable?

    I think I have rings so I guess the experiment would basically cost me the price of the rail which will be about $50 mail ordered unless somebody has a line on a local vendor.

    Any advice or direction from a scoped pistol shooter would be appreciated

    Also I have 100 or so once fired .480 ruger cases I'd love to get reloaded.... I don't reload myself unless Lee starts making a tap tap hand loader kit which I'm not holding my breath

  2. #2

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    It's a trade-off in my long experience with them. Scopes can add dramatically to your range potential from a rest, but for me at least they're harder to shoot accurately offhand. Others mileage will most certainly vary. Realizing the extra range potential will teach you more than you ever wanted to know about consistent grip and wrist tension, consistent trigger squeeze, and consistent follow-through with the shot.

    Another trade-off is in carry. I don't know of a single belt holster that works well enough, even ignoring the weight trying to pull your pants down. You'll be carrying it in some kind of chest or shoulder rig. I've put slings on scoped Contenders, and really hated the results.

    One thing I found that really suited me. I carried an open sighted revolver in a belt holster along with the scoped handgun in a shoulder holster. It sounds weird, but I switched back and forth between them depending on whether I was in the brush or in the open. Dandy.

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    I would try to find someone with a scoped pistol that would let you try it out ,don't know where your at but there are a lot of good people willing to help out, just ask. I have several with different scopes, I really like the scoped handgun but some of my friends say they just don't feel right.
    Alex

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    I have scoped a few handguns and find it to easily double the range I feel comfortable hitting things. My eyes aren't so good at 62years and the scope makes the sight picture much easier to aquire. I have never tried the 1x ( no magnification ) scopes but I would suggest a 2 or 2.5 power to be much easier to make hits at longer ranges. Unless you plan on having a rest for the gun while shooting, 2.5x is about as much as can be held steady in a field position.
    As for ammo cost, you really need to start reloading. If your tight for money, and who isn't, Lee makes some very inexpensive beginners loading tools. You could get started with their hand held press a set of dies, powder scale, and a hand primer for about $125. They also make starter kits that are fairly inexpensive. Reloads should cost between $.60 and $.80 per round depending on bullet. If you are going to shoot this a lot then casting your own bullets can save a bunch but thats another $100+ Ammo cost would be down to about $.25 per round. I shoot a 454Casull among others and the $35 for twenty rounds is beyond what I'm willing to pay. If you want to get dies, powder, primers and bullets I will let you load on my equiptment and show you what you need to know. I live in the Chugiak area.
    Last edited by rbuck351; 12-05-2010 at 22:33. Reason: Forgot to add

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    Scope it. Up to 75 yards irons work really well for me. But the ability to line up the sight and target plane at 100+ yards is well worth it for a long range hunting hangun. I have been playing around with a .460 XVR and out to 200 yards am able to smoke clays (a 4" inch target). With irons my limit was 100 yards. So put a scope on it and get a chest rig to carry it comfortably.

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    I have that for me, scopes on hardguns are really hard to use, particularly if you don't have a rest. The solution I have found is a red dot (like the Ultradot 30 I am so fond of). They are easy to use up close, offhand, and I can comfortably use them out past 150 yards. And a big plus is that they really have no equals in low-light.

  7. #7

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    I will try to apply an answer that is very general, and what works for ME, after nearly 40 years of handgun hunting, and for 25 years of retirement almost daily. I don't like to use scoped revolvers! But I find times if you want to be successful (RESPONSABLE) I need the scope, even at close range! I hunt with revolvers only 80 percent of the time for Whitetail, I use it for other hunting but durring the 29 days a year that I hunt them with a gun I'm packing a revolver 20 to 25 of them, and a scoped SP the rest. The only way I've found to comfortably carry them is with a shoulder type chest holster, and the absolute most uncomfortable is on my hip, I love the chest type so much I have now bought another rig, a Barranti Nortwest Hunter for my unscoped Big Bore revolvers, and a Northeast Hunter for scoped. This carry's it without knowing it is even there. If on the hip or back on a belt it was always hanging up and catching brush, it just don't on my chest, and the weight is on the shoulders and really unnoticed. This is my chesty puller from Rob Leahy at Simply Rugged, a great Rig!!.I am a purist at heart, and prefer open sights! I'm also an old man and a realist, and know it is more difficult with open sights and aging eye's. But I don't care how young one is, you can't make a responsible shot on any game animal, without light! period. I hunt where no beam of light or in one state, no electronic sighting device is permitted! Check your laws if you decide to go with a battery power scope! I also find for me those first and last few minuetes when there is so little lightbI am able to center the silouette of the animal and center it out to about 50 yards and can make a lethal shot, but a lighted reticle even on its lowest setting interfears with the target and I cant make out the object, I also am allowed to hunt 1/2 hour before and after sun up, & down. I assure you even in a full moon open sky night with snow on the ground, you will see the front sight on the snow, but put it on a deer a tree or anything not illuminated at any range, it will disappear. In an open field they may be usable to 25 yards or so in those same conditions, but that is only in perfect situations available about 2 or 3 days in a a few years time! But if you get it in the forest down in the bottom of a hollow, in the thick brush I prefer to hunt in, you will not be able to make a responsible shot. PERIOD. And in every other lighting situation with no snow te help reflect moon light, you will be lucky to even see the rear sight, let alone the front, no matter how good your eye's are. That is the only time of day I like to use a scope though, it gives you the ability to make the shot out to about as far as you can sillouette the animal, in low to no light. Now it has some requirements as others have stated, they don't let in much light, and the more power the less they let in! I have owned and used most ever EER made, from 1x TC's to 3x12x32 Burris, Leo's, Weaver's, B&L's even some cheap not so reliable's. My findings for low light use, a straight 2x is brighter than a variable with the same setting. I also think as long as you are using a big bore you are big game hunting (just assuming) and anything over a 2x on any revolver will work excelent out past 150 yards! You will also find it much quicker and easier to shoot off hand. The years I've hunted this whitetail season I have had more than a couple times at last light or first light, not been able to take the shot, and usually they are under 50 yards, because I had open sight's, a shot I would not hesitate to take at sunup. I use a 1 1/2x4x28 Burris on my 7 1/2" FA 454, I use a 2X Weaver on my Ruger .45 SB Bisley Hunter. I use the 454 for Hogs and it will work @ 4x with my walking stick as a rest aid, and out to 150 yards I have not missed a pig or cyote with it, standing still ovcourse. My .45 colt got the Weaver because I dont use it past 150 yards, it is as bright as the Burris or Leopold, and lighter than both & shorter, and seems to hold up. On a Raging Bull I would use a Burris or Leupold as both are very strong scopes and have a lifetime warranty, weather you bought it new or not! and finally the picture will show you why I develop my own ammo and make my own bullets, besides I can do it for less than .25 cents a piece. I've not seen anyone do this with factory ammo? There are 6 shots in each target, the picture is of two different loads, a 250 grain right, and 340 grain left, not bad for a Ruger, My FA's will do a little better! So Your choice, check your laws on legal equipment, and have at it. I use the revolver without optics most of the time, it has cost me a few deer and cyotes over the years but those were longer shots with low light, and shots I would have taken irresponsibly 25 years ago. It is a revolver but I pride myself and my hunting buddies know me buy One Shot Bob! ONE SHOT ON KILL! To me thats handgun hunting, and most know if I shot more than once, I had multiple tags. and any responsible hunter will use whatever aids he can legally use to aquier those results! Almost forgot, a scope is not a fix for shortcomings on handgun accuracy, you will still require the same efforts to be proficiant, PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE!!! AND MORE THAN 100 CASES!

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    I too am getting old eye. I LOVE my 30mm Ultradot 4 on my 7.5" 480 Ruger SRH. Quick sight aquisition in most any conditions, rugged, & makes me considerably more accurate.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vance in AK View Post
    I too am getting old eye. I LOVE my 30mm Ultradot 4 on my 7.5" 480 Ruger SRH. Quick sight aquisition in most any conditions, rugged, & makes me considerably more accurate.
    Exactly! I am still running on the original battery after four years of frequent use!

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    good point on checking the regs where I plan on hunting as far as possibly going with a dot sight
    right now probably WA, ID, maybe GA or WI at some point
    I'm going to look into the hand press and dies thing, I used to reload but I got rid of everything
    I'm sure I'll accumulate more than the current 140 cases I have
    How many times can you reload them before they need to be trimmed??

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    Quote Originally Posted by gottago View Post
    How many times can you reload them before they need to be trimmed??
    I haven't loaded for 480, but 44 mag and 454 are fair comparisons, I bet. The answer is never. I only load full-snort mag loads in cases 4 times, then relegate them to midrange loads for firing maybe another 12-15 times. Your bigger enemy will be mouth splits if you get carried away with the mouth expansion or crimps.

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    Thanks Brown Bear
    I don't plan on shooting this gun a lot
    4 or 5 loads each in my 150 - 200 brass should last me a lifetime
    I hear what people are saying about practice practice practice and I agree
    But that's why I have a double action S&W 22 pistol 95% of the practice benefit for a small fraction of the price ammo wise
    Once I get used to the scope setup that's probably mostly what I'll do

    One of the best hunter/marksmen I ever knew used to shoot a ton of 22 ( he really PRACTICED with it, didn't just burn powder) but come hunting season he'd take his hunting rifle out, go the the "range", shoot ONE bullet and repeat a dozen times over the course of a month pre season

    As he said, that's what you'll realistically do in the field

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    I've been looking around and I see mounts for a 6.5" Taurus Raging Bull but I have a 5" barrel

    Is there a local place that would carry these if available?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gottago View Post
    Thanks Brown Bear
    I don't plan on shooting this gun a lot
    4 or 5 loads each in my 150 - 200 brass should last me a lifetime
    I hear what people are saying about practice practice practice and I agree
    But that's why I have a double action S&W 22 pistol 95% of the practice benefit for a small fraction of the price ammo wise
    Once I get used to the scope setup that's probably mostly what I'll do

    One of the best hunter/marksmen I ever knew used to shoot a ton of 22 ( he really PRACTICED with it, didn't just burn powder) but come hunting season he'd take his hunting rifle out, go the the "range", shoot ONE bullet and repeat a dozen times over the course of a month pre season

    As he said, that's what you'll realistically do in the field
    That'll work if you start shooting your 22 at 50-100 yards. That's the only way it might help you learn about grip, wrist tension, trigger squeeze and follow through. Shorter range shooting covers up a lot of evils that will haunt you if you try to take advantage of the long-range potential of the scope. I'm betting after you shoot the 480 a few times at 100 or 150 yards you'll either be so discouraged you dismount the scope, or you go ahead and shoot it lots to overcome the problems.

    You just can't believe how much little changes in your grip, wrist tension, trigger squeeze and follow through will move a bullet at longer ranges, especially with recoil added to the mix.

    Let us know how it works out. In the meantime, I'm betting you end up reloading a whooooooole lot more than what you think.

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    Check laws carefully. Some refer to a laser that puts a spot on the animal and not a lighted reticle or dot. It is to stop poaching where a laser allows night hunting but a dot scope will not because you can't see past it at night, too bright and you will not see an animal.
    Once it gets too dim, the dot sight is useless. It will only take you to legal hunting time and a rifle scope will take you farther and darker.

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    this is my contender in .35 remington with a 1X4 weaver scope, as it is both heavy and unwieldy it is carried in this chest rig by uncle mike's. my .375 win barrel is scoped with a 2X leupold. both shoot very well if used from a rest. offhand, not so much. with my shooting 2X is about right, over 3X is wasted on me as it seems hard to hold.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Shop around for some used equipment at gun shows. I picked up an RCBS press, scale, and powder measure for around $50 total at the last show. The Lee dies do work and are a heck of a lot cheaper than the others.

    You can get into bullet casting cheaply with a Lee mold and sizer for your regular press - less than $50. I went that way with my .500 S&W at first and I'll have to admit that you can make some pretty good bullets that way. Not as fast or the quality of my SAECO, Lyman or RCBS equipment but it does work and you can pay for it in only a few hundred rounds.


    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I have scoped a few handguns and find it to easily double the range I feel comfortable hitting things. My eyes aren't so good at 62years and the scope makes the sight picture much easier to aquire. I have never tried the 1x ( no magnification ) scopes but I would suggest a 2 or 2.5 power to be much easier to make hits at longer ranges. Unless you plan on having a rest for the gun while shooting, 2.5x is about as much as can be held steady in a field position.
    As for ammo cost, you really need to start reloading. If your tight for money, and who isn't, Lee makes some very inexpensive beginners loading tools. You could get started with their hand held press a set of dies, powder scale, and a hand primer for about $125. They also make starter kits that are fairly inexpensive. Reloads should cost between $.60 and $.80 per round depending on bullet. If you are going to shoot this a lot then casting your own bullets can save a bunch but thats another $100+ Ammo cost would be down to about $.25 per round. I shoot a 454Casull among others and the $35 for twenty rounds is beyond what I'm willing to pay. If you want to get dies, powder, primers and bullets I will let you load on my equiptment and show you what you need to know. I live in the Chugiak area.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Some where around this house, I have two Leupold pistol scopes [2X & 4X, I think].....I'd part with em if I can find em.

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    I use a custom cross draw holster with suspender tabs , Have a rear sling swivel and sling on a .454 Casull 7.5" with a fixed 2 power Leupold pistol scope . With the cross draw and the sling adjusted properly as you reach for the grip you are on the right side of the sling . When you pull and draw you lock into your eye relief then it's just get on target .

    My rig was set up by Larry Albach of SoCal. silhouette champion and custom Knife maker.

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    Here is a link to one of Larrys [Bladerunner] posts that might help a new shooter...

    http://www.walker47.com/w47/articles...rksmanship.htm

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