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Thread: Ferry had to hide out due to weather in PWS

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Default Ferry had to hide out due to weather in PWS

    It was on the news last night that the fast ferry Chenega had to hide out for the night in Cabin bay, I think on Naked Island. Pretty bad when the ferry can't make it though... or did the captian just use some wind as an excuse to drop the hook for the night and hang out in the sound?

    http://www.adn.com/2010/12/04/158769...-storm-in.html
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    Default 60 knots at Pilot Rock

    A few days ago the Resurrection Bay (not gulf coast) forecast was 10 ft seas.
    I thought, really ?
    Looked at Pilot Rock.................
    It held steady above 45kts from the north and gusting to 60kts for almost an entire day
    glad my boat is buried in my driveway.............

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    It was on the news last night that the fast ferry Chenega had to hide out for the night in Cabin bay, I think on Naked Island. Pretty bad when the ferry can't make it though... or did the captian just use some wind as an excuse to drop the hook for the night and hang out in the sound?

    http://www.adn.com/2010/12/04/158769...-storm-in.html
    I can guarantee you spending a night in the sound is the last thing the capt want to do

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    I can guarantee you spending a night in the sound is the last thing the capt want to do
    Good point but

    i think thats the 2nd to the last. The last thing he wanted was to sink his boat in a storm. he kept everyone safe. good call in my mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    I can guarantee you spending a night in the sound is the last thing the capt want to do
    I meant that to be in jest. I think it is impressive when someone makes a decision like this and does not push through anyway and get in trouble. I am sure there was natural pressue to get trough from both the people on board and just the idea of completing the trip.

    By the way, I should be the first one to point out that this is in the wrong forumn. I meant to start it in the Power boarding forum.
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    It must been pretty bad the closest I've been to being sea sick was on a ferry to kodiak with waves breaking over the bow. It takes a lot to get them to shut it down.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    The Tustemena (which usually does the Kodiak runs) and the Kennicott are the only 2 ferries that are "ocean worthy". They have bulbous bows, and are designed for the big water. The others, even though many bigger are rated for inside passage type trips only. So, what is rough water for the Tusty would be REALLY rough water for the Chenega

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    Ah that make sense
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    It must been pretty bad the closest I've been to being sea sick was on a ferry to kodiak with waves breaking over the bow. It takes a lot to get them to shut it down.
    We must have been on the same trip......I didn't get sick on the Ferry but the next day when I leaned back in the shower to wash my hair, I lost it. Was sickier then a dog all day. It was the same day the Ferry broke the door open over towards Cordova. Trying to sleep you had to be strapped in, heard a hold down chain below deck snap, sounded like a 30-06 going off, almost 18 hours to go from Kodiak to Seward. What a RIDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    That ship that was adrift in the Bering sea (738' hauling Canola oil) was in 29' seas.... 10' doesn't seem that bad for a ship the size of a ferry.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akheloce View Post
    The Tustemena (which usually does the Kodiak runs) and the Kennicott are the only 2 ferries that are "ocean worthy". They have bulbous bows, and are designed for the big water. The others, even though many bigger are rated for inside passage type trips only. So, what is rough water for the Tusty would be REALLY rough water for the Chenega

    kenni has a bulb, tusty no bulb

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    The Tusty has been cut in half twice and extended. First trip I took on the Tustumena before it was extended was from Seward to Kodiak in 1967, it was call the blue canoe back then and for good reason.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    That ship that was adrift in the Bering sea (738' hauling Canola oil) was in 29' seas.... 10' doesn't seem that bad for a ship the size of a ferry.
    More often than Not, actually, Almost Always,
    The boat is considerably tougher than the people riding on it or driving it,

    Chances are good, the Capt. held up for the sake of those riding more than he did for fear of losing the boat to the weather.
    It can get "Mighty Miserable," for even the experienced crew, a long while before the vessel itself is actually in trouble.

    Probably Not Worth It, to endure that, just packin' passengers.

    How long is the Chenega anyway, one of the Fast Ferry, Catamarans maybe, or what?
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    It was the fast ferry. I was told that since it was a catamaran, it was not designed for rough seas. It is still a pretty big boat (235' x 60') to be stopped by ten footers. I suspect that there is more to the story than was published. Bottom line here is that the captain made the call and the passengers were delivered safely, albeit late, but safe.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Wow, 235 ft, is Really Big Boat, to be stopped by ten footers, maybe there is some kind of major tide rip he has to pass through in there somewhere that stacks up a lot bigger than the ten ft report??

    I wonder about the cat style holding up in big seas, just seems like there would be a lot less ability to plunge down and through stuff when they are designed like that, to stay evenly up on top?
    Not sure I would want to drive one but that is a huge boat to be pulling over in ten foot seas, must be more to the story

    Hope he doesn't get too much grief for being late tho, I know I'd much rather have a humble guy in the wheelhouse than the opposite

    That's OUR Boat too, right? A State Ferry paid for by all of us somehow? Good Call Skipper
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Who knows why? I have always been told that catmarans are more stable than a reugular hull. But yet the Chenege (a catamaran) can't run in the same weather that the Aurora (regular hull) can. Is it because the Chenega has jet propulsion and the Aurora has a prop?

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    Quote Originally Posted by giten-a-life View Post
    Who knows why? I have always been told that catmarans are more stable than a reugular hull. But yet the Chenege (a catamaran) can't run in the same weather that the Aurora (regular hull) can. Is it because the Chenega has jet propulsion and the Aurora has a prop?
    Cats are typically most stable in light seas since they tend to spread out their load over more areas, bridging across the peaks and troughs. In larger seas, they don't respond as quickly and can be much harder to handle. They just don't react the same.

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    Cats are a more stable fishing platform and do better in moderate seas. A mono hull will do better in the big stuff from the information that I have gathered. It is really impressive how fast that ferry cruises. I think the Klondike Express out of Whittier can hit 50 knots!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Those fast ferry catamarans can be pretty snappy. One issue they have in 10+ foot seas is cavitation. And they can't make headway or have any control. If the waves aren't coming straight on the bow those boats really roll around. Even in 5-6 ft seas. The Fairweather cancels in Lynn Canal a few times each year because of high winds and 10-12 ft seas. They just can't control the boat.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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