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Thread: cutting trails, getting somewhere

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default cutting trails, getting somewhere

    so as I understand it, it is okay to make a trail on state land, using handtools up to and including chainsaws. heres the link to that. http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/factsht/gen_allow_use.pdf

    Also you can ride ATV's anywhere that its not restricted right? State/public land of course.


    Seems that if you can cut a trail and get across all these stupid rivers in the way, it ought to make for some good access.

    Anyone do any trailblazing?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    so as I understand it, it is okay to make a trail on state land, using handtools up to and including chainsaws. heres the link to that. http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/factsht/gen_allow_use.pdf

    Also you can ride ATV's anywhere that its not restricted right? State/public land of course.


    Seems that if you can cut a trail and get across all these stupid rivers in the way, it ought to make for some good access.

    Anyone do any trailblazing?
    carful on the river part. recently the Department F&G and DNR.. backed off making damage to andromdoios (sp?) rivers a bailable offense with set fines ... one thing they did not do was describe " damage" currently there is no distinction between and ATV crossing a creek or a bull dozer plowing down one..

    as for the trail building. i am JUST getting into that learning curve with DNR and Habitat. AND Forestry.. there is more to just cutting one. you kind of ( if understood correctly) are also responsible for it in some fashions..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    well for the river part Im thinking of building a ferry. SO far all I have for an idea is a frame with two big cataraft tubes. And a mount at the rear for a outboard. There is a lot of state land on the otherside of all the major rivers.

    Vince do you use the alaskamapper? Im trying to figure that thing out. I got my eye on an area to explore. Looking at it from google earth, I dont see any trails, but the terrain looks doable. Im trying to figure out who owns the land. For the most part it looks like the state does, but then you zoom the map then crap, lots of blocks and colors pop out. Furthermore, lets say you figure it out on paper, how the heck do you know where your at when your boots are on the ground?

    Man I miss the easy days!

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    Default interesting idea

    cut the trail in the late fall, early winter. (I like the idea of no bugs) Run it during the winter on snow machine, and keep extending the trail. When you get to the river, string a cable across. Assuming of course that the river is not navigable and nobody will lose their head if they are running the river. Then build your raft. It'll be there in the summer waiting for you.
    If you end up being the only guy on the other side, how could that be a bad thing? I think you might need a way to secure the raft so others can't use it. Having a way to disassemble it and hide it a bit might not be a bad idea.
    Another way to do this is to find a cheap flat bottom boat and drag it in in the winter. You'd just have to hope nobody would shoot holes in it. It would be easy to hang a small motor on to push on across the river.
    You have my gears turning now. There are a lot of possibilities.
    One more, would an argo make it across the river in question? That would eliminate the need for a raft, and very few guys seem to have them.

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    The river Im thinking about is the big su. SO that cable Idea is out. But good idea, I might apply that elsewhere.
    Im no argo expert, but to me it looks like crossing a major river with an argo would not work. Maybe if you put an out board on. But the way they float would have me worried. It wouldnt take much to get water over the edge and then youd be hosed in a heartbeat.

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    I've cut a few short trails in over the years (2 miles or less). Most of the time there isn't a lot of cutting involved. I pick and choose my way through the woods and only cut trees if I have to. Willow thickets are where the most cutting occurs. I try to keep the trailheads as untouched as possible so the trail doesn't become a major thoroughfare quickly. So far only a handful of folks know where I've been.

    I watched a couple of guys ferry their wheelers across a pretty significant river (slow flowing though) on an inflatable raft near Glenallen. They had 2x8 boards across the pontoons and drove the wheeler up on them and strapped it down. They used a small motor to get across the river and unload. They deflated the boat and stashed it and off they went. You couldn't see their trail across the river since the trailhead was tucked in a cove that wasn't visible from the other side. Pretty ingenious and I'm sure they got to some pristine area since we were a long way off the highway to begin with.
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    You might have a hard time fitting and Argo on the 5' max wide trail allowed in the regs. The smaller ones are 58" wide, the larger ones are 60" (there might be a couple other dimensions I didn't see).

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    rimfirematt, Where are you when your boots are on the ground? That is what a GPS is for and some Topo Mapping Software. (Garmin preferred.) Then you can transfer that information to Google Earth and there you are.

    Bruce.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AB RANGER 007 View Post
    rimfirematt, Where are you when your boots are on the ground? That is what a GPS is for and some Topo Mapping Software. (Garmin preferred.) Then you can transfer that information to Google Earth and there you are.

    Bruce.
    I know how to be in the ball park, but when you look at the maps, there is all kinds of little plots of land that you need to avoid. Also finding the easements will be challenging. Luckily my Dad is a surveyor. I just need him to come along and show me how.

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