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Thread: Special Clothing Option needed

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Default Special Clothing Option needed

    I love to climb/hike all the hills/trails/mountains here in south-central Alaska. My most enjoyable time is in the winter and 20F or lower. I am a big believer in layering, with fleece and wool being my buddies. Windpro or GorTex are good friends too Somewhere along the line I must have frostbit my belly because that has become a problem, even at temps around +45F. Every time I come in, my belly is beefy red in color and needs to be "warmed", usually by a hot shower or bath. No other part of my body gets cold or shows any signs of cold injury.

    What I am looking for is any idea of a product that only keeps the belly warm. If I put too many layers, the rest of me sweats really bad. I have used a neoprene back wrap, and that helps the cold issue but is not comfortable. I have tried a couple of different vests, but they really have not helped. I could make something I guess, but I was wondering if anyone else has had this problem and if any solutions have been found. Thanks in advance!
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Not really clothing but might help. I have had 2 back operations, so I suffer from severe lower back pain. I use thermacare heat wraps to keep my back warm and to ease the pain. They last 8 hours or longer, they work so well in fact that I now use them to sleep warm on cold nights and to keep me warm while snow machining or sitting on stand. Just wear them backwards to protect your belly.

    Like these.
    http://www.cvs.com/CVSApp/catalog/sh...e_Free_Listing

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3

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    I have the same problem but not as severe. I enoy recreating during the winter months as well and I always come home with the red cold belly. I have a Sporthill shirt hat is wind resistant in the front and very breathable in the back that is a good part of my layering sytem. I think that nordic skiing gear in general has a fair selection of gear that provides windproof fronts and breathable backs. I think if I lost the fat off of my belly that I would improve my ailment as well. I know alot of women that get cold butts and I think it is due to the naturally highter body fat in that location.

    Good luck
    Brian

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Not really clothing but might help. I have had 2 back operations, so I suffer from severe lower back pain. I use thermacare heat wraps to keep my back warm and to ease the pain. They last 8 hours or longer, they work so well in fact that I now use them to sleep warm on cold nights and to keep me warm while snow machining or sitting on stand. Just wear them backwards to protect your belly.

    Like these.
    http://www.cvs.com/CVSApp/catalog/sh...e_Free_Listing

    Steve
    thank you for the info about the heat wraps for the back ..my back is shot and i been going to the doctor to see if he can do anything for me now ..

  5. #5
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I use thermacare heat wraps to keep my back warm and to ease the pain.
    I was thinking about this option as well. Been talking to the wife about making a pouch to put the hand warmers in.

    I also have notice "since" I lost a bunch of fat off my stomach (still more to go) it has become worse. I will check out some of the CC ski cloths...makes sense that they would have the right type of clothing option...
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Wear a down or primaleft vest. Keeps the core temp higher but allows the pits to breath.

  7. #7
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by needcoffee View Post
    Wear a down or primaleft vest. Keeps the core temp higher but allows the pits to breath.
    So far I have never found a down product I can use when climbing because of how hard I sweat. I love down for most things, but when I exercise I really sweat baddddd! Not complaining, just a fact. I frequently will carry extra (dry) stuff and will change out when I get ot the summit (into dry gear). My chest and back are always toasty and never get cold...just the gut area. I like a polypro type fabric as a base, wool shirt over that (buttoned at the belly at all times), and a windpro vest over that with the belly closed. Then I can use different coats over that, depending on how war/cold it is. To give you an idea of my seweating...I frequently climb the Butte which is about 900 feet vertical over about 3-4 miles RT. It takes me 45-60 minutes from leaving the truck to getting back, depending on conditions. My Polypro and wool shirts will be completely soaked,even when it is below zero. I try to always have dry cloths in the truck for the return. With as hot as the rest of my trunk is, I am surprised how cold the belly gets. This next week when I am off work I am going to try hand warmers :-)
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I tried the hand warmer trick. Ended up duct taping two of them on the outside of my base layer. Worked okay, certainly better than nothing. I think I need to make some sort of a pocket. With my belly size, I may need to use more than two ;-) I was surprised that these hand warmers stay warm for 6-8 hours!
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    I tried the hand warmer trick. Ended up duct taping two of them on the outside of my base layer. Worked okay, certainly better than nothing. I think I need to make some sort of a pocket. With my belly size, I may need to use more than two ;-) I was surprised that these hand warmers stay warm for 6-8 hours!
    Rodger, try the thermacare back heat pads. They are just like oversized hand warmers and they come with a belt to slide them into and secure around your waist. They also will stay hot longer, 10 to 12 hours.

    Steve
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    Founding Member
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