Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: How do you find a good spot?

  1. #1
    Member 700sps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northpole
    Posts
    36

    Default How do you find a good spot?

    The title says it all.This is my first year ice fishing and just wanted to know how to find a good spot?Do you go to your usual fishing grounds during the summer?or do the fish like different kind's of environment during the winter?do you map out the lake and gues?or do you just keep changing spots till you find where the fish are biting?Any info appreciated.Thanks for looking

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    A good starting point is to look for old holes that have blood around them.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  3. #3

    Default

    It always seems a little better if you walk away from the access point. I try to find some contours like points into a cove and such. I drill a quick hole and fish it immediately. Then after a minute, I try to look down into the hole to assess the lay of the land. I typically like to sight fish during ice fishing so depending on the clarity of the lake, I try to set up in 5 to 15 ft of water for trout and dollies. It can be a whole lot shallower for pike it seems like. I then proceed to drill holes perpendicular to the shoreline (i.e same point, different depths) When I find a good depth, then I start spreading out along the shorelines at that depth.

    The key I think for us is the visually looking down the hole. We prefer gravel with some weeds. Even if there are no keeper fish, if you can see abundance of baitfish or freshwater shrimp like copepods ( I think that's what they are) then you might stay put. Ice fishing for stocked trout, it seems like they circle a certain area so you can also often tell that most of your fish are coming and often going back in the same direction. Ice fishing while peering down the hole is much more exciting than the world's best video game! If you don't do it, you will be amazed at the number of fish you will see pass your bait or lure up.

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default

    All the above, plus use the ADFG bathys. Try fishing various depths at each spot. Vary your Offerings. Go farther off te beaten track. Use a chum container.

  5. #5
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    what i do, especially for new locations ive never fished before, is check out the lake maps from adfg. course they dont have EVERY lake, and of course they are not 100% accurate sometimes, but they are a valuable resource . there is a sticky thread at the top of this ice fishing forum for the maps list page.

    you just have to try it for yourself and see if the lake is worth fishin. thats my advice. give a lake a good trying effort and if you get skunked you try someplace else next time



    Release Lake Trout

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 700sps View Post
    The title says it all.This is my first year ice fishing and just wanted to know how to find a good spot?Do you go to your usual fishing grounds during the summer?or do the fish like different kind's of environment during the winter?do you map out the lake and gues?or do you just keep changing spots till you find where the fish are biting?Any info appreciated.Thanks for looking
    Drill baby drill.!
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    A real good fish finder some times will help you find the fish faster
    # 1 will tell you if they are there
    # 2 will tell you the depth of fish are at
    # 3 how deep the water is
    # 4 if you don't see they won't bite so move an drill more holes till you find them
    fish off points is a good place to start

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I plan on getting into it next winter with the kids. I have been researching it now and have found a couple of interesting things. One is the ADF&G marine contour maps which certainly can't hurt! The next is that many lakes you can get a feel for their depths based on the google earth aerial images. I plan to use a both to find the holes that should hopefully hold fish. I figure that the aerial images will help me orient my location on the ice by helping to identify landmarks and help me hit the different bottom features and depths.

    In the long run probably an over technical analysis spawned from two much time in the sand box with web data to peruse and little to no actual fishing to do! In the end I have little doubt that I will use what I have to get started then subscribe to the "drill more holes" philosophy. <grin>

  9. #9
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    191

    Default

    All of the above is sound advice, and you will also want to try different depths. Drop your bait or jig all the way to the bottom and bounce it for a while, if nothing hits, crank up a few turns and jig again. Give at least fifteen minutes between depths. Trout are finiky, some days, eggs are the hot ticket, other days it will be shrimp, or powerbait. I have caught some monsters in some of the most heavily fished lakes around Anch. on some of the most suprising tackle. Not knowing what the day will bring is half the fun!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •