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Thread: What sleepin bag rating for September bou hunt?

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    Default What sleepin bag rating for September bou hunt?

    What rating for a sleeping bag would you recommend for a early to mid September Mulchatna caribou hunt? I know there is no industry standard, but this will give me a good starting point. I do know that synthetic is preferrable. Thanks.

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    BTW...I am considering The North Face's Cats Meow. It is rated to 20 degrees.

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    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default Temperature

    A 20-degree bag should be fine, but ideally at that time of year you'd see temperatures in the teens.

    I personally would take a zero-degree bag. Not because I was expecting to see zero degrees, but the fact that I'm flying in and not packing the bag pushes me toward a warmer bag each and every time.

    If you buy a 20-degree bag, then you'll need another bag for later hunts. Purchase a 0-degree bag and you'll have both covered. Then get yourself a niche bag for backpacking purposes.

    Hope that helps.

    Taylor

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    Thanks Mark. That's what I've been thinking.

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    okbowman;

    if you like t.n.f. bags then take a look at the snowshoe 3d it is a 0 degree bag. it is a lot of bag for the money. never read a bad word about them. i had one for many years.

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    I actually don't know a lot about North Face bags, or any other for that matter. I just read a decent review on the Cats Meow and was considing it. Thanks for the advise. I will definately look into the snowshoe.

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    I'm also considering the Mountain Hardware Lamina 0 degree.

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    Default Bag

    We bought one of those Wiggy's bags and really like it. It belongs to my 12 year old son but he has had to lend it to his two sisters. I guess I'm going to have to spring for another one.

    It's the two part bag rated to -40 when they are both together and rated I think to 0 by itself without the overbag. They usually like to use them together if not in a back pack. It's a lot easier to unzip a bag if its too warm than to try to pack on warmer clothers etc.

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    Default

    Back to the original question. I have to agree with a 0 degree bag. The nights can get cold with frost and ice in the water bucket even the first week in Sept. If its warm, you can always vent a 0 degree bag. I've been snowed on in Sept out there too, it all depends on where you are. So the best, in my opinion, is a zero bag.

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    Default snowshoe 3D

    Quote Originally Posted by cold zero View Post
    okbowman;

    if you like t.n.f. bags then take a look at the snowshoe 3d it is a 0 degree bag. it is a lot of bag for the money. never read a bad word about them. i had one for many years.
    cold zero - you [I]had one[I] for many years...do you still have/use? If not, what are you using now?

    buck

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    For the group,
    Buying or having a fleece liner for your bag is a good idea. Fleece liners add about another 15 degrees to your bag's rating.

    In my experience, for Alaska
    a +20 bag for summer, a 0 bag for spring/fall, and a -40 bag for winter

    Also
    Never sleep in the clothes you wore that day (unless you like being cold)
    and air your bag out every day the weather permits

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    Thumbs up Cat's Meow

    I didn't think the North Face Cat's Meow was available.

    Anyway, I have that bag and love it. I haven't been cold in that bag yet. I have a bivy sack-nothing special- that I use and I sleep with my head covered. Personally, zero degree bags are too warm and tend to be bulky, but less weight. I don't winter camp either. Cat's Meow is a great all-around bag for fall hunting and camping.

    Tim

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    Since I am from a much warmer climate (Oklahoma) I figure it is best to get a 0 degree bag because I will not be as acclimated to the weather as you Alaskans are.

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    Default Careful...

    ...with that Mountain Hardwear Lamina series of bags. The insulation is continuous filament, however it runs the length of the bag and not the radial of the bag.

    This will be a tremenodous problem if the bag is laundered, and continued tossing and turning within the bag will cause seperation of the insulation.

    How do I know? We bought two, laundered one then cut it open to see what effect it has on the insulation. Drastic. Additionally, the overall length shrank 4 inches after one laundering. There was considerable bunching of the insulation, forming clumps in some places.

    Not a nice try at a stich/quilt-free insulated bag. We rated it "disposable" after one laundering.

    I'm a fan of Mountain Hardwear tents, but not of this bag at all.

    Just a thought.

    Taylor

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default 0 degree bag...

    I have used a 20 Kelty on the last two trip I have taken on lower Noatak tribs north of Kotz. Both trip were end of August. On about 2-4 nights, I really wish I had taken 0 degree bags. I will be using them on next trip. You can boil water on stove and fill 32 ounce nalgene bottle and throw it in the bottom of your bag. This works better than you would think. And wearing a hat (fleece or similar) will keep in alot of heat also. But in the end, I think a bag should be rated to 10-20 degrees cooler than the temp you plan to use it in. There is no industry standard and different companies 20 degree bags are not the same. Go with a 0 degree bag and be warm at night. Also, if your bag gets wet (it happens) you will lose alot of the insulating qualities of said bag. At that point, having a bag that is rated warmer than you think you will need will seem like the smartest thing you have done in a good while. Dont underestimate the imortance of a good sleeping pad for its insulating qualities. Thermarest (popular brand) used that name for a reason. It is not intended just to make the sleeping area softer. It insulates you from a cold ground. Get the best bag and pad you can afford. Save money somewhere else. Mummy styles are warmer but offer less room in bag. Rectangular styles are more comfortable if you like to toss/turn/stretch out. Down is warmer but needs to be kept dry. Use good quality waterproof bags for it. The more you are willing to pay, the more compact the bag will pack. The Big Agnes bags that I am buying for next trip compress to 7" X 8" and weigh less than 3 lbs each. That frees up alot of room in your bags for essential items (bourbon).

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    Dan,

    Which Big Agnes bag are you buying? I haven't looked at them so they might be a consideration.

  17. #17
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    Default Big Agnes

    I have looked at a few. Still havent decided. The Zirkel looks great (packs small) and is rated to 15 degrees. The Pomer Hoit (link below) is rated to 0 but is a mummy style. I favor the rectangular style for its added room. Decisions, decisions. Super high quality bags from what I have heard/read. They sell pads that will fit the bags too. One of the newer ones is better for cold temps. They pack small as well. Super nice combo here. I will attach a link to their website.
    http://www.bigagnes.com/str_bags.php?id=sk Dan

  18. #18
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    Thumbs up Great Bag

    If you want down I would highly recommend Montbell. I got a U.L. Super Stretch #1 rated @16. Took it goat hunting and used a bivy bag, stayed super toasty and dry in driving rain and sleet for 6 nights. Most comfortable bag I've ever used. Got it from Back Country Gear on sale for about $260.

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Montbell

    I have heard those are great bags. But at 6'6" 320lbs, my options are limited. I just cant fit in most bags. That why I am so fond of the Big Agnes bags. They are "big boy" friendly. Ha Ha Ha.

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    Thumbs up

    The Cats Meow is avaliable with a 9 inch extender, adding lots of room for only 9 oz. If it gets cold you can zip it off and go back to the bags 20 deg. rating. Mine is very comfortable.

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