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Thread: Freighting windows to my remote cabin site

  1. #1
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    Default Freighting windows to my remote cabin site

    I would like to hear thoughts on "safely" getting my windows to my place without breaking them. Trail conditions will range from "good" to "challenging". Should I lay them flat, build a rack and stand them up, etc...? I will haul about 10 windows total with little time or extra budget to replace any that break. I will not be hauling all 10 at one time. Any pictures of successful methods would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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    What about a one time price for an airplane to freight them out. Get a quote, do the math and fill the plane up with other stuff i.e. fuel to the cabin. If you have a friend with a plane pay the gas. May work out to get them in one shot and install them quicker. You may get away with out framing them just heavy blanket. Just a thought.

    George

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    Windows with frames or insulated glass units? Assembled windows are much easier for obvious reasons but one rule is true for both. Glass is flexible. Depending on the airspace the two panes of an insulating unit can flex toward each other and when the glass touches in the middle? Broken glass. That's why window cartons say not to lay flat. It isn't a problem with small units but it is a problem once you get past 12 or 15 square feet. Less if you'll hit sharp bumps. The easiest and most reliable way to transport windows or glass units is on an A frame. It doesn't have to be fancy. What it does is allow you to secure the A frame down to the trailer so all you need to do to the windows is tie them laterally to the frame. Two or three windows on each side and you're finished in two trips. With vinyl windows make sure to keep the boxes loaded like the carton arrows indicate. Bottom down/top up. If you ignore the arrows your glass will probably slip and shift. No need to make extra work.

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    Member AkKevin's Avatar
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    You should never transport windows flat. Always transport glass upright.
    Are we talking about goals or are we talking about dreams? AkKevin The one and only

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    It sounds like the preferred method is to transport them vertical rather than laying them flat. I have heard stories of well meaning cabin builders who have hauled their windows flat and had to deal with breakage, poor guys! An A-frame is simple to build and it makes sense. Thanks for the help.

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Windows stood up vertically will be very tippy, but it's really the only way to haul them. I don't know what size you plan to haul, but 3 at a time on a challenging trail is more than enough in most cases. When I haul vinyl clad windows I build a crate for each one out of them out of OSB.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I hauled over ten into my place using a frame built from 2x4's in the shape of a triangle. I used a sled with 4 skis and it really helped to minimize/eliminate the sled pounding on the trail. Of course the load has to be properly strapped too. PM me if you have questions.

  8. #8

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    I built the square frames out of 2 x 4's and then lined the insides with packing foam from office furniture. These windows are 4'' x 4' vinyl sliders. I hauled them out in the spring after we had a lot of snow and the trails were groomed well. Still needed to go slow......

    Attachment 42457

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    We looked liked the Joads heading west, but style issues aside, a 4x6 went in flat about 3-4 miles and is now installed. Plywood on an Otter sled, then a 3' door, a queen mattress, plywood & 2x6s, the window, plywood on top. Bunch of other stuff under the package in the sled. Surprisingly, very few adult beverages were used. Just gotta watch the corners to make sure you don't whack a tree. Not sure if I'd want to do it 10 times, though...

  10. #10
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Twofewweekends,
    I hauled all of mine on a home made flat sled (2"x10" 12' long runners with a deck on it). I stacked up to four windows at a time laying them flat on the sled. Between the windows and sled deck I layered with sofa cushions and strapped it all down with bungees to allow everything to move and wiggle while hauling it 12 miles thru woods and river trails. The windows are 48" x 60" and not a one broke.
    I wouldn't recommend it for all applications, but it can be done laying them flat on the sled.
    Did the same thing to haul out cabinets for the kitchen, no issues.
    BK

  11. #11
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Vertical, in the frames, with 2" blueboard worked great for me. I hauled 5 at a time (largest was 4' x 6'). I just used lots of blueboard (which I used later in construction anyway) and ratchet straps on a flatbed trailer. Just be very careful with the nail-plates on vinyl windows as they break off easy... take it slow, and readjust the load frequently.

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