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Thread: Where is your survival kit...? under the seat..? in the rack..?

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    Default Where is your survival kit...? under the seat..? in the rack..?

    Where on the snow machine is your survival gear........? Under the seat.....? In a waterproof pack in the rack....???

    If it is not on your body, it is kind of useless when the machine goes through the ice, or buried in a snow slide. Or the machine catches fire. If you ain't wearing it, it ain't much help when you need it.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Where on the snow machine is your survival gear........? Under the seat.....? In a waterproof pack in the rack....???

    If it is not on your body, it is kind of useless when the machine goes through the ice, or buried in a snow slide. Or the machine catches fire. If you ain't wearing it, it ain't much help when you need it.
    Couldn't agree more! I used to pack survival kits for a living. Mine is on my person--on my back and in my pockets.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    This is a good point. I carry in a backpack a change of clothes, my shovel, my probe, and my survival kit which has a lot of things but of most importance are matches, lighter, mylar blanket and candle plus signaling devices (whistle, mirror, flashlight). In my jacket pockets I also carry a knife or multitool, another lighter and more matches, plus my McMurdo FastFind and if I'm riding hill country I'll also be wearing my avy beacon.

    What I keep in the bag on my sled are "comfort items" such as drinks, beef jerky, extra handwarmers, tools.

    I used to carry it all on my sled but someone else mentioned how I might get separated from my sled and now carry the important stuff on my person. I don't even notice it anymore- the pack's not heavy.

    I recently read a survival story where a guy didn't realize he was on a cornice until it gave way- he fell 200 feet and broke bones. He was separated from his sled and his party (who could not reach his location) and the only reason he survived was that he had his survival gear in his backpack on his body. It took 18 hours for rescuers to reach him.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Where on the snow machine is your survival gear........? Under the seat.....? In a waterproof pack in the rack....???

    If it is not on your body, it is kind of useless when the machine goes through the ice, or buried in a snow slide. Or the machine catches fire. If you ain't wearing it, it ain't much help when you need it.
    +1 to that

  5. #5

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    And make sure the lighter or matches or whatever are in a waterproof package. I know you all know that already, but Dave had matches, and they got wet. Seems he decided the waterproof container my mom made him carry them in was too bulky. I just keep my stuff in zip lock baggies. I even take the matches on the plane when I fly (I try to be an optimist) ;-) The commercial airlines don't like it much when I try and bring my leatherman on board though...That's why I love to fly with Kenny :-)

  6. #6

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    If you have a FireSteel around your neck you always have fire. http://www.survivaltopics.com/forums/

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    I have just added that to my list. I will be making up survival kits for Christmas presents this year. :-)

  8. #8

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    +1 on having it on your person. I carry all my essentials in my backpack that is always strapped to my back. In addition to the gear in my backpack, I always have a Victorinox one-handed Trekker in one pocket and an inexpensive Benchmade lockback in the other. Also in my pocket is chapstick and a hankie which are both convenience items, but are multi-use items also.
    NRA Life Member, Prior F-16 crew chief.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    While there is always backup and convenince stuff in the trunk and in the cowling pouch, the "survival" stuff is always in pockets and pack. That includes the backup GPS (a little Vista) that is separate from the one on the handlebar mount and the SPOT and cell phone stays on person as well.

    One should always think about the possibility that you'll lose your pack and make sure you've got the basics in your inside clothing pockets.
    Winter is Coming...

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    I just vacuum sealed all of my stuff. Anything that took up volume is now squished compact and waterproof. My spare mitts are down filled and hardly take up any space.

    Anything electrical, think about holding close to your body (like inside your jacket). The extreme cold creates more resistance and will wipe your small batteries in no time.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I argued this for years with my friends. My stuff goes in my pack..on my back. Fall through the ice and it's nice to have your stuff. Smacked by an avalanche and live through it, nice to have your stuff on your back or your pockets.

    The point was proved to me one day at Lost Lake when two of my buddies got caught in a small slide and buried the cowlings on their sleds. Both had shovels mounted under their hoods. I had a perfect "told you so" moment when I assembled mine out of my backpack.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Depends on conditions. I don't carry an avalanche shovel on the rivers. I don't carry snowshoes when it hasn't snowed for a month. I don't worry about thin ice at Arctic Man. I adapt to what it is I'm doing. Day, night, mountains, rivers, deep snow, ice. Different conditions dictate different equipment and different techniques. I don't make the final decision until the sleds are out of the trailer and my gear is on.

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    Member Lake creek fishermen's Avatar
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    Usualy when me and my dad ride out to the cabin on the river, Both carry backpacks with out overnight food, Water, Juice, Food stuff. Spare bulvaka, hat and gloves, Spare shirt. On my body i always keep a few matches and a lighter, The cell phone and some tinder in the breast pocket.

    Most stuff is just for snacks, And a spare change for the next day of riding. Some for entertainment. But it shure would come in handy in the event of getting lost. Our sleds dont really have much storage on them (polaris iq's)So every thing is semi on the person.

    For mountain riding (Turnagain, Arctic man) Have a small shovel and gps and mainly travel light. Stay within sight of the 3-4 person group that we ride in. So far everything works out fine for us!
    -Its better to die on your feet, than to live on your knees.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I still carry my shovel on my back when riding in flat country. Sure makes it a bunch easier to get to when you punch into one of those 3' wide, 10' deep swamp creeks
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    I carry a small container, (Film, or orange colored match container) with vasoline soaked cotton swabs, just fluff up and hit it with sparks from steel and striker, (firesteel) it burns bright and for a long time. I like coats with lots of pockets and I use them to spread out the needed gear. A small fanny pack or back pack carries additional necessary stuff.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I still carry my shovel on my back when riding in flat country. Sure makes it a bunch easier to get to when you punch into one of those 3' wide, 10' deep swamp creeks
    I, too, carry a shovel regardless of terrain. Just because I'm river riding doesn't mean I won't trench it somewhere and a shovel helps. Additionally, if for some reason I got stranded somewhere in flat country I still would want the shovel to dig a snow shelter, or at minimum a pit to get out of the wind.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I carry all my gear all the time ('cept snowshoes unless I'm hunting). Don't know about you guys, but when I put in a 100+ mile day I usually have covered all types of terrain. I don't know I've ever spent an entire day on "flatland" where I didn't run into hilly terrain. My Lifelink shovel has come in VERY handy many times on what would be called flatland. Plus, if things go south and I have to dig in for the night, I'd really like to have my shovel. Also, thin ice can be found year around with flowing waters and spring fed swamps. Gotta stay prepared.
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    The guys I know who race in the Iron Dog put on more miles, harder miles, and spend more time in the boonies than any other riders I can think of. The required equipment list is pretty complete yet I can't recall the competitive teams wearing backpacks or carrying shovels.

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    Pid- I don't disagree with you at all, we all have different methods of doing things. But most of us aren't IronDog quality riders, nor are we riding in terrain like they do. Lets face it, a huge portion of the IronDog is on trail and they do it with short tracks.

    When I ride with other guys my shovel rarely comes out as you almost always have someone to pull on a ski. However, I don't always ride in a group and the shovel sure beats wrestling a sled. Plus, I don't always like to ask for help when I do something stupid.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Guys who want to seriously address their survival gear on snowgos can learn a lot from the Iron Dog racers. Especially the racers who've been at it a while. They've come up with very clever solutions for storing more stuff than most of us would consider carrying. The big mountain boys get separated from their sleds when they get pitched so backpacks make good sense. Retrieving a buried sled at the bottom of a long chute is a chore. Most of the rest of us aren't in those conditions, either. Find your own compromise. My backpack will almost always be strapped on the tunnel. More stuff in the seat trunk, handlebar bags, shoved into every nook under the cowl, etc. There is no unused space on my sled. Finding ways to stow gear is fun. A few things that are always in my pockets? A sat phone, a lighter, and a leatherman. I carry a Pelican mini flashlight around my neck all winter.

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