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Thread: Black Powder in Anchroage

  1. #1

    Default Black Powder in Anchroage

    Where is the best place in Anchorage to purchase black powder and 209 primers?

    I'm new to muzzle loader hunting and Santa will be brining me a smoke pole for X-mas.

    Thanks

    Flyster

  2. #2
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    the only place I know of that sells genuine black powder is Great northern guns. I sometimes see it at the birchwood shooting range for sale too. There is a guy at the gun shows that sells black as well. You can find him through Mckinley mountain men muzzleloader club. His name is Keith Bayha.

  3. #3

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    If your going to do a lot of shooting you might consider having it shipped in by the case lot. http://www.jackspowderkeg.com/

  4. #4
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    If you are uisng 209 primers might as well use pyrodex RS. Easier to find, easier to clean.Available at sportsmans etc

  5. #5

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    I should have clarified I am not looking to shoot "black powder" but want to shoot the more reliable black powder subsitutes.

    How much easier to clean is Pyrodex RS, and what is the difference between Pyrodex RS and regular Pyrodex?

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Forget pyrodex. Go with Triple Seven.

    The letter designations on pyrodex are just the grain sizes. P for pistol which replaces 3F black powder and RS for rifle/shotgun which replaces 2F black powder.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  7. #7

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    I agree that Triple Seven is about the easiest thing going to clean up, short of American Pioneer. AP however, deteriorates really quickly once you open a jug in a damp climate, so I steer completely clear of it. One thing to note on Trip7 is that it takes less of it to generate the same pressures and velocitities. IIRC the can sezz reduce loads by 15% to achieve the same as you do with Pyrodex or black.

    My experience with Pyrodex is mixed. If you don't get barrels cleaner than clean, they're gonna rust and pit in storage even when oiled. I'm talking a whole bunch cleaner than most guys manage. I use Pyro when that's all I can get, but a week after cleaning, I clean it again and check it with a dry patch a month later. The pitting doesn't seem to hurt accuracy right away, but once it starts it accelerates each time you shoot later. More places for faint bits of residue to hide out, I guess.

    I also steer way clear of pellets in our wet climate. The boxes aren't designed well to keep out humidity after you open them, and even when you put the box in a ziploc after opening, ignition gets really hard, the longer you keep them around. If I was going to shoot up the whole box within a couple of months, that's another thing. But if most of it is going to be sitting till next year, ignition problems are the norm in my experience. Loose powder of the same make shows none of that tendency, except American Pioneer. Year-old cans of AP clump up and are hard to light, and on my chronograph velocity drop runs as high as 40%. You can actually hear the difference between a new jug and one that has been opened a year before.

    In spite of all the advertising and sales pitches, I actually find real black powder easier to clean than Pyro. I check a week and a month after cleaning, but have found no sign that buildup has remained, or that pitting has occurred. I've tried it in modern inlines, and I actually like it. I hate to use it in them because black is hard to get where I live and I reserve it for my traditionals. But it still works really well.

  8. #8
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    I don't know that I do anything different cleaning Jake, but his has not been a problem for me. I have been shooting the stuff in one T/C Renagade for over 30 years. I tried triple seven in my inline but seemed to get a ring just above the breech plug after the first shot. ( problem was noted by others) I find BP fun to shoot, but messy for a range session and hard to clean. Not to mention being hard to find and transport as it is a no kidding explosive. Each to his own though. I guess the best advice is to get a can of what you can get ahold of and start shooting.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    I guess the best advice is to get a can of what you can get ahold of and start shooting.
    Words of wisdom! Whatever works for you and is easiest to get, but the bottom line is to keep shooting!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK flyster View Post
    I should have clarified I am not looking to shoot "black powder" but want to shoot the more reliable black powder subsitutes.

    How much easier to clean is Pyrodex RS, and what is the difference between Pyrodex RS and regular Pyrodex?

    Thanks.
    Where did you get the idea that the "black powder subsitutes" are more "reliable"?

    They're all harder to ignite, and at least some of them, probably all, collect moisture more so, than BP does.

    I shoot a LOT of BP, and I get multiple shots before I hafta clean the barrel. Clean up is EASY, with just soap and water.

    The substitutes may be more available in some areas, but that's the only advantage I can see. No substitutes for me though. I recommend the REEL stuff.

    Smitty of the North
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    You can't out-give God.

  11. #11

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    Any of you have any experience with the 209 buckhorn powder?

  12. #12

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    Secondhand reports only. A friend in the down below reports happiness with it in the midwest, but I know for a fact he shoots less than 5 times a year.

  13. #13

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    My experience with Pyrodex is similar to what BrownBear alludes to, you have to get that barrel cleaner than clean or you'll have problems. I use to think of myself as being fairly thorough when it comes to cleaning my barrels, but now have a pitted T/C Omega barrel after a few trips to the range with Pyrodex. Bummer. I've used 777 for a long time and have always had good luck with it. My experience has also been that Pyrodex is much more "gummy" in the barrel after firing than 777. No experience with Buckhorn or the Jim Shockey brand.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by shearej View Post
    My experience has also been that Pyrodex is much more "gummy" in the barrel after firing than 777.
    That's a very good point Shearej. Pyrodex is "picky" about which lube you use. Some leave the fouling nice and soft and not a problem while shooting. Others leave it hard, and in very short order you're swabbing between shots, even to be able to load and shoot again. My pick for keeping it soft are grease based like Mink Oil Grease from Track of the Wolf, or homemade tallow concoctions. Even plain old Crisco! Lube use is normal with patched balls or bare lead conicals, but not with sabots. I haven't tried many different brands of sabots to see if some are better, but those I've tried require frequent swabbing due to dry, hard fouling. I've even considered lubing my sabots!

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