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Thread: 22-250 feeding problems

  1. #1

    Default 22-250 feeding problems

    Gun is a Rem 700 22-250, the problem is that about one out of every 3 rounds wont chamber. I cant lock the bolt down without extreme force.

    Rounds are once fired brass, trimmed to length, full length resized, OAL is 2.350 inches.

    All my factory rounds load fine they have a OAL of 2.320 I thought maybe my handloads were to long but that dosent explain why some load and some dont. Bullets are 50 gr speer spitzer sp.

    Any help would be great.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    IMHO that sounds like the shoulder on the ones that won't chamber aren't being pushed back enough. I have had this happen to me, can't explain why other than I don't use as much force sometimes. I have started measuring every round and this solved my problem.

    In other words screw your die down and size them shorter and try that.

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  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Check your hard to load rounds for high primers. This will be evident by rub marks on the primers. Also, if the seating die is screwed down too far you could be pushing the neck back and bulging the bottom of the shoulder slightly. Or, like has been mentioned, your sizing die isn't down far enough.
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  4. #4

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    My thinking is running along the same lines as stid2677, but trimmed cases would solve the problem of shoulder-set back if the seating die was set so low that it was trying to crimp the bullet.

    Another possibility is that you didn't chamfer the cases enough inside and out following case trimming. If there is a little lip of brass remaining and that rifle has a particularly tight chamber, you could get enough swelling to interfere. I've got a 257 Roberts that RCBS built for me back in the 1970's, along with a custom sizing die. There's a close fit between sized cases and the chamber, but if I leave even a frog hair of a lip following case trimming, I get the same symptoms you describe. In my rifle, if I extract the round rather than fire it, I can see a little polishing on the case neck after that happens.

  5. #5
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    Another thought, don't overlook the fact you may be crimping the bullets. It can deform the case if to much crimp is applied.
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  6. #6
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    Not every brass case is the same. You need the sizing die adjusted to where all of them get sized enough. Turn the sizing die down towards the shell holder a bit more and try it.

    DO NOT NEGLECT, what gunbugs said, either. IT referrs to a VERY COMMON mistake made by beginning handloaders.

    If you have your seating die adjusted down to where it crimps when you don't wanna, or to crimp too much when you wanna, and either, is coupled with different lengths of brass, the crimping shoulder can push the neck down and expand the shoulder. A LOT will be noticable, and/or collapse the shoulder, BUT, a little bit could cause hard chambering. If that's it, back off the body of the seating die and readjust the seating stem for your OAL.

    And, make sure all your brass is trimmed to the same length.
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  7. #7
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    After you cartridges have been made up, remove the primer punch from the full-length sizing die and run the shell into the die all the way. This will iron out and possible kinks in the brass. Perform the other things suggested also, as you need to find what is the cause of this, but for now, do a few cartridges and look at where they are being squeezed by the die. Report back with pix.
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