Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Blood tracking lights?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default Blood tracking lights?

    For sometime I have been interested in learning how to blood track. The best way to learn is to practice tracking. I decided to start by taking some moose blood and seeing if my headlight would make it stand out. It did not work. Has any one used one of the so called blood tracking lights?

  2. #2

    Default

    Never tried one, but I've talked to a number of people who say they are pretty worthless. Hard to beat a bright white headlamp for tracking.

  3. #3

    Default

    Had two of them while guiding Midwest whitetails, and 'used' them to trail around 65 deer. They pick up clots, small pools, and larger blood pools fine, but for drops and flecks they are worthless. I also caried regular flashlights and used them along with the Primos lights. All of us can find pools, it is the drops and flecks we need help finding. In my opinion, they are not junk, but they don't help enough to warrant a purchase.

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    First of all please be aware that we really don't do a lot of blood tracking at night in Alaska. I have field dressed moose until the batteries died at 1:00AM. I have hiked back to camp too many times at 1:00AM. But I have never tracked in the dark.
    And don't be concerned with special lights or any gadgets other than a range finder. Just use your eyes, progress slowly, screw all the television gadgets, and you will find the game that is findable.

    And one more thing about them television dudes or magazine writers selling gadgets to be used on farm and ranch hunts....most all of 'em can't fill the jockstrap of most any Alaskan wilderness hunter or guide. So, yes, I do advise that you learn to track and blood trail animals. Just learn it and DO IT like everybody else does with sharp eyes, slow feet and a relentless but discriminating mind.

    Learn one critter at a time. After a hundred blood trails you should be quite efficient.

    Dennis

  5. #5

    Default

    After a lifetime of bowhunting a variety of animals, I can confidently say this: The brighter and whiter the light source, the "redder and better" the blood shows. Colored lights are very simply a gimmick and do not enhance our ability to discern red blood. Someone saw a potential market and the industry pounced. I've used gas lanterns, propane lanterns, halogen lights and LED lights to blood trail at night. The far-and-away winner is a very strong, very bright LED lightsource which uses a color-corrected LED. Such a light will have less bluishness and appears a bit "warmer" in its color. The average LED headlamp is good for a nice easy bloodtrail. The very strong (and increasingly pricey) handheld LED lights are superior when the trail gets tough. I invested in a Fenix TK40 over a year ago. It features a Cree Quad LED, and uses 8 AA batteries at once to emit over 750 lumens of light. I can clearly see a deer at 100 yards and a deer's eyes at 1/4 mile with this light. I gave over $150 for it, but I also rely on it for home defense. One blast to the eyes and you're blind for over a minute. Best light I've ever held in my hands.

  6. #6
    Member Trappnguns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Back on da Rock!
    Posts
    329

    Default

    First of all please be aware that we really don't do a lot of blood tracking at night in Alaska.
    Really?!? Why?

    I have used a Coleman lantern for the best visibility. For me it makes it stand out more than anything. Remember though, people see colors differently. Try a few things mentioned and see what works for you.

  7. #7
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Trapp..........
    I wrote "First of all please be aware that we really don't do a lot of blood tracking at night in Alaska."
    you asked "Really?!? Why?"

    Answers...1)Because critters shot through both lungs gets dead fast and do not require long tracking....
    2) Sheep and caribou die easy and generally die within sight up in the alpine or on the tundra. Mountain goats, die in tough country and generally also die within sight...no tracking required...
    3) moose do not seem to go far, ever (somebody can not disagree) when shot in the correct body parts...
    4) black bear can be a pain at sundown, and while I have only been in on eight (?) kills, none ever required "dark time" recoveries...black bears die easy.
    5)brown bears do "die hard", even mortally hit, and often do make it into the bushes, but of the 35+ (??) kills I have witnessed none required "dark time" tracking. Although two were tracked and recovered right at that moment when I wanted to back out. I'll leave the night time blood tracking of brown bears to you or anyone else. Come to think of it, of all the brown bear camps i have been in during the last 14 years, i can not recall any of the guides or hunters talking about blood tracking brown bears after dark.

    While some, possible many, will disagree I simply have not had to do any night time blood tracking in the 200+ kills I have been in on in Alaska. I prefer it that way. Personally, tracking when required works best prior to the suns evening departure. Yes, if I were hunting farm country whitetails i could understand that some blood tracking after dark could be required.
    ...just a few tracking thoughts based on only the experiences of this hunter/guide.....of course the experiences of others may differ or be more extensive or just plain different...
    And good luck to everyone who totes a Coleman lantern around with them while hunting in wilderness Alaska.
    My lantern, if I even have one (on a moose hunt), will remain in my camp.
    Dennis

  8. #8
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    And another reason why blood tracking after dark is seldom required in Alaska....

    Reason # 6) When hunting spring bears, brown or black, in May the sun does not go below the horizon until after 11:00PM-ish, and then rises around 4:00AM-ish. After starting the "hunting day" as early as possible (6:00AM+-?), It is hard to still be hunting 15 or 16 hours later at 10:00 or 11:00 PM when it gets darkish.
    Spring hunts...lanterns not required for light or for blood tracking. But YES, nice to have for a source of heat.
    dennis

  9. #9
    Member Trappnguns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Back on da Rock!
    Posts
    329

    Default

    Having back-up shooters, and not shooting near sunset must be nice. Good on ya for not having to track anything at night, I prefer it that way too.

    Unfortunately, for many bow hunters (I am guessing there are quite a few in AK) late shots and tracking deer might be more common than you think. Sheep, Goat, Bear and Bou aren't the only animals in Alaska. Not everyone makes a perfect shot either. Deer can disappear quick and don't normally run in a straight line. They can go quite a ways even with a good shot.

    Not all of Alaska is backwoods wilderness either. I can hunt goat, bear, deer and small game in about 5 minutes from my house. No camp required.

  10. #10
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Trapp....Diversity is a great thing.....and all of the contributors to this lil discussion have all been correct...
    Good luck with your lantern blood trails, to those who have purchased blood tracking light gadgets, and to all of us who just use our eyes.

    You are correct that not all Alaskan hunts are wilderness hunts. Mine are.

    Hopefully Rutting Moose may get some of the info and insight he was asking for from the diverse info we, as well as other contributors, have provided.

    Hey, hopefully all of us illuminated this topic (LOL).............................D out

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    You have no idea; I took blood from a moose roast and tested several flashlights today. The difference between fresh and dry blood using a flashlight is major, you donít want to wait for blood to dry.

    I also measure the distance between the prints of a walking moose. I now need to chase a moose and measure the distance of a running moose and note the pattern. Just kidding on the chasing. J I also found other information on the web. Man, I need a life.

  12. #12
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Rut...........
    To prove that many of us "need a life", just read the "Sword for hunting thread".............
    It actually make me want to start my regular work tasks....where is Darwin?.......

  13. #13
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Blood from a roast will not be as bright as fresh blood either... It's mostly watered down blood.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    It did seem darker than human blood, unless I can find a living blood source what do you suggest, other than using my own blood? I wonder if I could use oxygen to oxygenate the air.

  15. #15
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    ....or you could go out and harvest a critter...

    Rabbits might be a good test subject...although having snow will make it a little easier!!

  16. #16
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    RUt...............i do admire your "training enthusiam" Many/most(?) of us train for so many different situation and conditions. so good luck for your blood tracking project.

    Sounds like a jeff Foxworthy joke...you knoW your an Alaskan huntin redneck if.................
    ..............If you intentionally spread out a fresh boodtrail for tracker training, to see if ya can/can't follow it......... .

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    "...After a hundred blood trails you should be quite efficient.

    Dennis
    Long before "a hundred blood trails..." probably should should be re-assessing hunting methods!
    Joe (Ak)

  18. #18
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    It did seem darker than human blood, unless I can find a living blood source what do you suggest, other than using my own blood? I wonder if I could use oxygen to oxygenate the air.
    well reading this in stages as i have....


    that WAS my first thought... punch your self in the nose and run around... come back clean up then go track it...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,031

    Default the color of blood

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Blood from a roast will not be as bright as fresh blood either... It's mostly watered down blood.
    Good point. Also, a blood trail from a double lung shot will be a far different color and pattern than any other type of wound.

    In other words, the second you begin blood tracking, you very likely know if its a lung shot. In these instances I believe it to be smarter to just sit down and rest for half an hour before tracking to let him lay down and "rest", so you'll track a lot shorter distance rather than makin' him run.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Very little night tracking here in Alaska unless it is dark out, and that is half of the year. I have found that the best light system for tracking blood,( i have done a lot of it in Maine) is the good old coleman lantern. It makes the blood droplets stand out great, even on wet leaves. That is just my opinion.

    I posted on the hunting with a sword. Just to add a little humor to the post. About elf hunting.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •