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Thread: Warm pants for minus 50 degrees

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    Default Warm pants for minus 50 degrees

    I'm going to be living in a tent in the middle of nowhere in Arctic Siberia for a few days in january. Temperatures can drop to minus 50 centigrade or less and it caqn be extremely windy. I have enough gear to keep every part of my body warm, apart, possibly, from my legs. My question is the following: should i invest serious money in super warm pants such as Marmot 8000m or the Arctic bib pants from Northern Outfitters? Or will what I currently have be just as good: 2 layers of full length thermal underwear, a pair of cargo pants, a pair of padded pants and a pair of goretex waterproof pants on top?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddyv View Post
    I'm going to be living in a tent in the middle of nowhere in Arctic Siberia for a few days in January. Temperatures can drop to minus 50 centigrade or less and it caqn be extremely windy. I have enough gear to keep every part of my body warm, apart, possibly, from my legs. My question is the following: should i invest serious money in super warm pants such as Marmot 8000m or the Arctic bib pants from Northern Outfitters? Or will what I currently have be just as good: 2 layers of full length thermal underwear, a pair of cargo pants, a pair of padded pants and a pair of goretex waterproof pants on top?
    well it all depends on what you will be doing in the -50.. sitting in the tent? or out working a line?

    -50 is not that hard to work in if geared for it...

    i like a thin base layer. with a Polly pro heavier layer... maybe a fleece pant and a wool over shell... and suspenders to hold it all on and up... as i like my winter clothes a little large for movement inside. nothing tight or restrictive. same as my boots.

    a quality wool hat, and upper garments and an over coat.. you should do fine. keep your trunk warm and hands and feet will stay warm.
    stay moderately active while out. and your body will heat it self... provided you fed it good the eve prior and morning of venturing out into the cold...

    remember to shed layers as soon as entering or warming the tent.. so as no to sweat in your gear. if it is wet... get it dry well before doning it again.
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    Member AlpineEarl's Avatar
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    Leave anything made of cotton at home. Vince's advice was spot on. Layering is want you want to go for. If you're going to be active it's perfect because you want to avoid sweating. If you start to sweat you can always take off a layer to avoid overheating then put it back on when you are static. A pair of silk long johns with layers of poly pro or something similar over the top and then a shell and you should be fine. I have an old army wool bear suit that's extremely warm, and cheap. I've seen the pants on ebay and in surplus stores for 10 bucks. They are perfect for when you are static. My gore tex pants have full length side zippers, so when I want to put on the heavy pants I don't have to take anything but the shell off to do so. The bear suit pants fit under the gore tex shell. Just do a search for "Army bear suit" and you'll see a number of places to get them. If you don't end up needing them, the ten bucks won't hurt too bad.

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    I've all ways been comfortable in the black duck carharts bibs and a coat over the top. If it gets to warm take off the coat. The one thing to remember is a good hat keeps in the warmth, and I find a good all-a-round hat is martin- or lynx. A beaver hat can sometimes get to warm in lesser temps.

    A good pair of white bunny boots is a must in that temp.

    my 2 cents.

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    well it all depends on what you will be doing in the -50.. sitting in the tent? or out working a line?

    -50 is not that hard to work in if geared for it...

    i like a thin base layer. with a Polly pro heavier layer... maybe a fleece pant and a wool over shell... and suspenders to hold it all on and up... as i like my winter clothes a little large for movement inside. nothing tight or restrictive. same as my boots.

    a quality wool hat, and upper garments and an over coat.. you should do fine. keep your trunk warm and hands and feet will stay warm.
    stay moderately active while out. and your body will heat it self... provided you fed it good the eve prior and morning of venturing out into the cold...

    remember to shed layers as soon as entering or warming the tent.. so as no to sweat in your gear. if it is wet... get it dry well before doning it again.
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    Not much to add to Vince's input except that the Northern Outfitters bibs are phenominal, IMO. They are super warm and the insulation wicks moisture (and sweat) away from you super fast. I've been up to my thighs in water in mine and although your inner layers are wet, the insulation seemed to wick most of the water away (or drained into my bunny boots) and after dumping the boots out, I stayed reasonalby warm in below zero temps the rest of the trip.

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    this is all verry interesting.
    i have spent some time in 0 degree weather before I found wool golves handy even getting them completely soaked shoveling wet show out of boats really seem to loose the water out of them emediately. I usually wear mittens over the gloves so my hands stayed comfortable.
    I like my chillis (silk) they are thin and wic the moisture away. I wished I had wool pants but you use what you got, levis.
    I layer my shirts and jacket, For boots I wear sorels ( don't laugh) I can change one pair of the liners every nite and let the wet ones dry during the day. I sweat heavy , especially my feet, so they work for me.
    You need to considdr a muffler or equivelant because breathing sub 0 weather can burn your lungs .

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    There are a lot of different options out there but some of the key factors I have found are the following. Stay away from gortex as an outer layer. At the temperatures you are planning on operating in it will not allow moisture to escape and you will get condensation building up on the inside. Make sure to using a wicking layer and I have found that I prefer merino wool during extremely cold temperatures. Utilize a middle layer such as fleece or polypro. I you don't plan on moving a lot, you might get away with using some puffy pants. Then either a breathable soft shell or wool outer layer. Like Vince stated already make sure nothing is restrictive since this will effect your blood circulation. I personally don't care for the heavily insulated bibs because as soon as I start moving at all I end up over heating. I like the option to layer up and down. Hope this helps.

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