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Thread: Night flight - Help!

  1. #1

    Default Night flight - Help!

    Can anyone recommend somewhere to do 25 hours of cross-country night flight training, as this is not a requirement in NZ under Civil Aviation law, but I will need this if I'm ever going fly in Alaska.

    How often would you guys actually use this in reality?

  2. #2
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    Where are you located? We must have night flight training in Alaska if you want to fly after October, especially the farther north you are. Right now, in Anchorage, Sunrise is around 0900 and sunset around 1600. During the winter solstice in December, Sunrise will be around 1030 and Sunset around 1530. Like I said, the farther north, the more darkness until its nothing but darkness! That's a lot of night flying. It's the opposite during the summer...lots of day flying. In fact, towards the end of September, pilots are scrambling to get re-certified for night flight because certification is lost during the summer...with no night to fly in.

  3. #3
    Member RocketRick's Avatar
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    DUP,

    I got my night endorsement in '83 but haven't flown much since then till now. I've never used it. If your VFR like me, your really are not flying that much at night.

    I think it's good to have it tho just in case..

    I didn't realize you need 25-hrs of cross-country time to get the endorsement. When I got mine I just went up one or two times at night and it was a done deal.

    Good Luck with it,

    Rick

  4. #4

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    Heres a link to FAA rules which reads like it is a requirement - or am I mis-interpreting it? I'm located in the south of New Zealand - lattitude 45 south. Shortest day ( in June ) is about 0800 to 1730, and longest 0430 to 2130. I'm VFR only and thats all I'm interested in and was surprised to find out about this rule, I dont really want the endorsement, just to be leagal to fly part 135 ops so that I'm employable there. - It's definately not a requirement under CAA, in fact I dont think its even legal to go more than 25nm from a lighted aerodrome at night unless under IFR!

    http://www.flightsimaviation.com/data/FARS/part_135-243.html

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    Ok the reg is a little how shall I say open to discussion. To fly under part 135 VFR you need to have at least 500 hours logged and if you are going to fly at night you have to have 25 hours of night time logged and have an instrument rating. If you are ok to fly at night in NZ than you have your night time req. In the US there is no night rating, you do your ten take offs and ten landing to a full stop and your instructor makes a note of it in you log book. Most do this while working on a private pilot certificate. If they don't then there is a restriction to day light hours on the certificate till you do the 10 take offs and 10 landings. I don't have my FAR's handy at the moment, and its been 36 years since I had to wonder about such things. I will look into it for you and either post or pm you. NZ some great fly fishing on the South Island, I could get use to it in about 10 sec.

  6. #6

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    OK, I see, thanks.

    Its basically the same as here then, as I thaught it would be, as our CAA law is set to ICAO standards as FAA is, even the relevant part numbers correspond. The only real difference I've discovered so far is that a cross-country here is 25 nm not 50, I guess this is because the country is smaller. This means that I have all the requirements plus some which is good news. Thanks.

    Yes there is excellent fly fishing here. Hunting also if you're into chasing red or Fallow deer, Elk, Chamois or Tahr. I'm very happy with my flying job here but I reckon I could get used to Alaska in about 10 seconds also, as it is seasonal and opposite to yours of course.

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    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Not to beat this too much, for the Pvt. Lic. you need three hours of night that must include 10 T/O & LDG's to a full stop and a X/C flight of a total of 100 miles. The CFI endorse's the log book and thats it.

  8. #8

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    All good. Thanks everyone.

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    dont forget in ak you can also get your pvt without having your 3 hours of night. you DO have to do your 3 hours of night within a year of your pvt or your licence will be void until you finish your night requirments.

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    I hate to beat this up any more, roamak is right. There is also a reg that allows us AK drivers to log a "night landing" when it is still somewhat daylight out if the sun is below a certain amount of degrees on the horizon. I used to use the rule to keep our pilots legal when I was chief pilot at an regional airline in AK. I will look up the reg and post it verbatum here when I get a chance.

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    Rocket Rick:
    If your VFR like me, your really are not flying that much at night.
    Last night was a perfect example of Alaskan winter night flying. My bride and I came back from up north around 2000 hrs. The moon was bright and full over the snow. The visibility was around 20 miles and the air was a super calm 10 degrees F.
    Flying over sparkling snow with the bright moon glow giving everything a light-blue shade, is one of the best times to fly...
    My wife was pointing out some of the brighter stars and planets as we purred along heading southbound.

    Just fly away from Anchorage and all those annoying electric lights and you will change your mind about night flights.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Rocket Rick:

    Last night was a perfect example of Alaskan winter night flying. My bride and I came back from up north around 2000 hrs. The moon was bright and full over the snow. The visibility was around 20 miles and the air was a super calm 10 degrees F.
    Flying over sparkling snow with the bright moon glow giving everything a light-blue shade, is one of the best times to fly...
    My wife was pointing out some of the brighter stars and planets as we purred along heading southbound.

    Just fly away from Anchorage and all those annoying electric lights and you will change your mind about night flights.
    Very well said . . .

  13. #13
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    spent 21 years flying nights , really miss it sometimes. night has its own beauty.

  14. #14
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    For some reason or another, the blue taxi-way lights always bring back a flood of memories involving childhood Christmas.
    Particularly when arriving home from a long winter night flight.
    I get that exicted feeling in the pit of my guts and could swear that I smell fresh ginger snaps and hot chocolate with a hint of spiced brandy.
    Maybe it is just the cockpit heating system cooling down...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Rocket Rick:

    Last night was a perfect example of Alaskan winter night flying. My bride and I came back from up north around 2000 hrs. The moon was bright and full over the snow. The visibility was around 20 miles and the air was a super calm 10 degrees F.
    Flying over sparkling snow with the bright moon glow giving everything a light-blue shade, is one of the best times to fly...
    My wife was pointing out some of the brighter stars and planets as we purred along heading southbound.

    Just fly away from Anchorage and all those annoying electric lights and you will change your mind about night flights.
    Nice! Bet you'll remember that one forever.

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    Oh yea, I am very much into hunting, in fact I been hunting White Tail deer since Nov 1, that is when rifle deer season started for me. As for flying, the FAA makes the rules and well the wording of the rules have gotten a little more lawyer in the past few years. When I started, it was a little less muddled than it is now, with the rewrite of some of the regs. Over all flying in the states is not all that restrictive. Its a little bit of a pain since 9/11 but over all, we don't have to do night ratings like most do else were, and I laugh my back side off when some one tells me they are type rated in a 172, here when you say type rating, we think one ok turbo jet, or an airplane or helicopter over 12500 lbs Gross Weight. Our written tests have become something of a joke, freedom of information act made the test questions public. Before you had to study and a good grade was an 85 anything above 90 was almost unheard of. Now its a matter of course to do better than that. But were pilots get hammered is in the Oral and the fight checks. Over all what you pilot certificate says you can do, you can do here. For the asking the FAA will issue you a Private Pilot Certificate based on your NZ License. The conversion is not hard or a drawn out thing. Mostly a test on our rules and a flight check. Then again there is more Aviation here, and a good chunk of GA is located in Alaska. Great place to fly, great place to live.

  17. #17

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    Well, most species can be hunted here all year round, except the Wapiti ( Elk ) which is ballotted, and that area closed through some weeks pre-rut. I really only trophy hunt now in the rut, or roar, being around April ( except to fill the freezer occasionally ).

    Our law is very much the same - wording can be open to interpretation sometimes, and legal phrasing makes it hard to understand the actual meaning of the sentence.

    I take it that any good flight school would be able to help with the exams and flight test required? I'd need commercial licence too.

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