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Thread: Lakes with larger trout or char?

  1. #1
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    Default Lakes with larger trout or char?

    Hi,

    I live in the valley and have not graduated to catching trout/char/salmon, through the ice that is, larger than about 12-13 inches. I'd love to catch a few in the 16" or better range, assuming they are out there somewhere. I'm looking for lake suggestions... anyone want to give a guy a hint? We just moved down from Fairbush about a year ago and don't have the area dialed in yet. If you PM helpful hints to me, I promise to keep them under my hat in trade...

    Brian

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    You might try Seymour lake out in the meadow lakes area.... some huge Rainbows in there. You'll have to be patient, but if your willing to put in 3-4 hours you have a real good chance of hooking an 18" or better Rainbow. Trust me on that.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    How far do you wanna' drive/fly/snowmachine to get to larger lakers/char?? That's the real question.

    There's lakes out there where a 16" lake trout isn't legal, let alone respectable. Some of those lakes support grand-daddy/grandmother lakers that exceed 42" and 43".

    Do some on-line searches for productive large lake trout lakes in Alaska. There's suitable lakes in the Interior, down on the Kenai Penninsula, in the Yukon Territory, etc.

    (Canadian) Wellesley (spelling?) Lake, just south of Beaver Creek, Yukon Territory, Canada, accessible by trail beyond the village of Snag in the White River drainage, is a prime trophy lake trout lake, though the last time I researched regs there, you could only keep one fish, if any at all, and size, bait, and lure restrictions apply.

    Many of the Yukon Territory lakes (either inside of Kluane Nat'l park, or in what their conservation dept. has designated 'quality waters) have 'slot limits,' meaning that fish between sizes 'X' and 'Y' have to be thrown back.

    Kathleen Lake, 15 miles south of Haines Jct., Y.T., toward Haines, Alaska, is one road-accessible lake for decent lakers. Also, if you take the Aishiak cut-off north, located east of Haines Jct., Y.T., and drive to the dam, you used to be able to park there, and snowmachine or boat up to the north end of the lake. There's the old original village of Aishiak, with but a few of the older cabins standing, some ernovated newer ones, and a dirt road access that'll remind your kidneys of just how old they feel. Up at the north end of that lake are streams that go to other lakes. It's good fishing up that way, and you can contact the Native Band there about using their recreational cabins for a fee..

    Kluane Lake technically isn't inside of Kluane Nat'l Park (nor is the earlier mentioned Wellesley lake), but it also has sizable lakers in it, and is obviously road-accessible.

    Kathleen Lake -is- in the Nat'l Park, albeit south of Haines Jct., as mentioned earlier. There are sometimes unique restrictions for each lake. At Kathleen Lake, in the recent past, there have been long-standing restrictions on barbed hooks, lead of any kind (whether in the lure or sinkers), no fish products or by-products for bait, slot limits for the trout (over 26" and under 39" have to be thrown back as prime breeding stock), and daily catch and overall bag limits (no more than two fish per day, two fish in possession, and only one of which can be over 39").

    Some of that may have changed this year, but I doubt it, as it's been part of the regs there for YEARS.

    There's East and West Twin lakes in Alaska, the various Tangle Lakes and other lesser lakes on the Denali Hwy, Copper and Tanada Lakes in the Wrangell-St. Elias Nat'l park, and many more, including kettle lakes in the Brooks Range.

    So, again, how far do you want to snowmachine, drive, or fly?? those questions will dictate where you're apt to be going for giant lunker lakers.

    But there's no fish I know of that's more fun to catch through the ice, (drill LARGE holes, btw), and better to eat baked, southern fried, deep-fried and breaded, etc., than a giant laker!! Omega-3s run out of the orangish-colored fat on these old fish like a water spicket in the north of the Netherlands. And all or most of the lakes I've listed rely on primarily wild stocks of fish, as far as I know.

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    And yes, I know I ommitted mentioning Lake Louise, Paxson Lake, Fielding Lake, Summit lake, and other lakes that are, in my opinion, 'has-beens' due to their road-connectedness, lack of self-discipline on the parts of anglers and poachers alike, and general fishing pressure due to location.

    I rarely fish those lakes anymmore, as they need a breather, unless I troll one of them in the later summer for giggles and grins.

    There's also Klutina Lake, though you'd need to check with AHTNA re. access there, but it's reportedly got nice lake trout.

    Deep, cold, clear, fresh water, adequate food supplies in the way of feeder fish, etc., often define a good lake trout-type lake.

    Good luck.

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    I had plans to fish lake louise in Dec. I think there is a good chance at some nice lakers still to be had there.

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    Uh, Ruffle?.....so what you're trying to tell us is that you've pursued this species a wee little bit.....

    The way that list was stackin up, I was wondering if you were going to talk about spots for icefishing Russia.

    Great info, I've got buddies that will fly out or snogo out and camp on these lakes just to get big laker pics...and, it works, but they earn it.

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    If I drank 'watka' or spoke some dialect of Russian or Ukranian, there'd likely be some Siberian or (further western) lakers in my freezer, Catch It! ;^>)

    Fortunately for my wife's retirement following my inevitable demise, and for my kids' allowances as well, I'm more prone to drinking mostly the occasional beer, and took French I twice in highschool, before going on to loftier engagements. ;^>)

    As I posted earlier, there -are- (some) road-connected lakes that still support large arctic char/lake trout, but it's partly due to regulations, fewer persons knowing about the specific populations, general geographic locations, and, not the least of factors, weather.

    Kathleen Lake, for example, can be a bear to put a boat on in the summer, with the lake running mostly north and south, with a wishbone feature to the topography at the northern end, about 2/3 of the way up. When you get out there on a sno-go, the ice is polished in spots to the point that I've seen snomachines with little to no freight load spin out with no traction, and my freight sled (absent skegs) has passed me up while I was feathering my throttle trying to maintain one direction of travel or another.. Any direction with minimal control would've been good at that time...

    That same wind that polishes the ice so nicely in that and other locations there when the wind is either southerly or northerly, also provides modestly surfable waves in the summer, and in the winter it's sometimes 'cemented' our trailers and trucks to the tall snow berms against which we park. (A heart-felt "Thank you!!" to the the Parks Canada plow operators who work with what can only be described as surgical precision.. ;^>).... )

    We once had a Parks Canada Ranger approach our cabin in the mid-morning of a 'somewhat affected' Saturday, amidst the slower part of a snow storm. We'd been out on the lake in 70+ naut gusts the day before, situating our machines in bays, mostly out of the main wind current, and with the windshields facing the wind's source (a lesson my older son learned in the most memorable manner, after trying to lose my brand new windshield by parking the rear of his sled into the wind).

    The ranger was asking who owned the trucks in the parking lot that were clearly unmoved and fixed in place by the wind-deposited fine particulate snow of the white-out blizzard that had come and gone numerous times the day before...

    Any time any of the various authorities start asking questions without revealing the target or purpose of their inquiry, my defensive suspicions perk up, after which I tend to let out only the precise minimal information being requested, if even that much, and nothing more.... especially until I know his/her purpose.

    It seems that my Canay'jun friends and I were fishing in weather that no locals there would fish in, and so the scuttle butt was that they may need to send out a search and rescue party for the missing (hikers/campers/cross-country skiers/????) who otherwise belonged to the trucks...

    "Nope, we're not missing. We're right here.. We're fine.. We don't need rescued... We're just that darned dedicated to catching some killer lake trout.. But, in the words of Eyore, "thanks for noticing..."....."

    Really a rather pleasant interaction after suspecting the worst... ;^>)

    And having access to a grand-fathered private cabin there has been a sharing of generosity that can't ever be emphasized or thanked enough. Seriously.

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    Getting hooked on Lake Trout fishing will make you insane, if you are not already.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Getting hooked on Lake Trout fishing will make you insane, if you are not already.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    See, I told you! Proof positive!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacherman View Post
    I had plans to fish lake louise in Dec. I think there is a good chance at some nice lakers still to be had there.
    What size fish would you consider nice?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    What size fish would you consider nice?
    well at lake louise? i would have to consider the stuff that made it through the netting mesh NICE
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Still nice lakers in all those lakes, just put your time in and fish. Oh and Ruf what about Tonsina, stud lakers in there. No mention.

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    I probably left out a bunch of them. No slighting intended.

    There's other lakes in the Wrangell-St. Elias Nat'l Park and Preserve as well that are more distant, and a bit harder to get to, but which sport giant lakers.

    I've never fished Tonsina.

    Crosswind Lake is supposed to have some decent fish, too. I haven't fished there yet, either. I nearly put an end to that status last spring, but I went elsewhere instead..

    Like I said; there's lots of these lakes out there. Finding them, locating the active holes/decent fishing spots, gaining knowledge of at least some of the lake-bottom's topography... and yes, putting the time in. Jigging at the right depth, using the right bait, and catching the fish at a time when they don't just tread water, staring nonchalantly at the bait like a cat looking at yesterday's mouse... all pertinent factors.. They're aggressive, ravenous eaters at the right moment.

    Hooking a giant laker and having it strip line off your reel, listening to the drag sing, and feeling that amazing battle in a 2' or 3' rod with 50-lb.-test spider wire, heating moose pasties in a camp pot made up like an oven on a camp stove, sipping exceptional beer in a camp chair atop crusted snow in the blinding late-March or early-April sunshine, while staring down into a deep dark hole betwixt jigging, to eventually witness that ancient-looking, dinosaur-like head come through a 10" diameter opening after a 20 minute fight? That's an addiction that'll turn many adults I know, including myself, into a giggling 6-year old in all of 5 seconds..... with no recollection of anything that was an irritant 10 minutes earlier, let alone 10 days, weeks, months, or years. It's perhaps the finest source of recreation, meditation and 'church' I know of; bar none.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    ruffle - You got it bad. What was your gateway fishing addiction? Rainbows or Salmon?
    Mike
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    I started out innocent enough; catching minnows in jars with my bare hands as a kid, wading in the streams, and keeping them as short-term pets (they don't do too well in captivity, apparently..).

    From there it was my first fillet-o-fish sandwich with extra tartar sauce, followed by some deep-fried breaded smelt from the Great Lakes.

    Before long I was seeking out private spaces, my face to the corner so no one could see me eating my fish; sometimes sushi, other times fried in various ways. Yes... I eat fish alone, and sometimes miss important engagements to either eat or catch fish. I once found some lures on the bottom of the lake, stuck on debris, and failed to seek the owner(s) via a posting of 'lost and found'; my first act of taking another's things to feed my fishing habit.

    Since then, I can't work, focus long-term on important tasks, or anything constructive; it's all about fishing for lake trout now..... and eating them, of course..

    At age 5 or 6 my father told me that folks ice fish by clearing off the snow, chopping or cutting a hole in the ice, and sitting with their hook in the water, waiting for a bite. He never told me that the fisherperson had to be on a lake or other frozen body of water, so I sat in the front yard with a patch of grass exposed where I'd dug down through the deep snow, sitting with my father's ice rod, waiting on a fish to come out of the base of the snow around my hole and bite my hook (true story!! really!!) Of course the fish never came, but I knew I was onto something big..

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    Hooking a giant laker and having it strip line off your reel, listening to the drag sing, and feeling that amazing battle in a 2' or 3' rod with 50-lb.-test spider wire, heating moose pasties in a camp pot made up like an oven on a camp stove, sipping exceptional beer in a camp chair atop crusted snow in the blinding late-March or early-April sunshine, while staring down into a deep dark hole betwixt jigging, to eventually witness that ancient-looking, dinosaur-like head come through a 10" diameter opening after a 20 minute fight? That's an addiction that'll turn many adults I know, including myself, into a giggling 6-year old in all of 5 seconds..... with no recollection of anything that was an irritant 10 minutes earlier, let alone 10 days, weeks, months, or years. It's perhaps the finest source of recreation, meditation and 'church' I know of; bar none.
    You said it brother!!!!

    I was out at one of our small local laker lakes today for about 4 hours and had a blast slamming fish on white tubes tipped with a frozen minnow.

    Read about it here:

    http://www.iceshanty.com/ice_fishing...topic=156710.0

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Mine started in about 4th grade. We had a school field trip to the fish hatchery in Wray Colorado. The goldfish in the holding tank at the farm sure had a big surprise when their daily feeding of bread crumbs had a few hooks when grandma wasn't looking. Next thing you know, I was floating worms downstream on leaves and dropping them into holes on the wee little creeks in the area. Places where a full grown man would need a chainsaw or a bush hog just to walk through. High school and a drivers license led many a brown and rainbow trout to their untimely death at Red Feather Lakes. Hiking 4 miles with a 12 pack of beer and way to heavy pack into the hardly known small rivers in mid-winter at midnight on Fridays. This is where I discovered the "shore lunch". Using a water bobber and wolly worm on the lakes was deadly. This troubling situation continues to get worse as time passed.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    Catching fish through a dark, deep hole, especially giant lakers, is like a first-time experience finding the prize at the bottom of the Cracker Jack box, except it's a -really- neat prize!... And it fights back a whole bunch!

    BTW, one summer in the early 80s, having headed out of Fbks toward Arizona to contend with some distant family members' distractions. I planted trees briefly at Red Feather Lakes, in the Roosevelt Nat'l Forest. One of the hardest jobs I ever had, despite its brevity.. Nice country. Rode a motorcycle through that general area too, during other escapades.

    Well, I was mostly staying on topic, right up 'til that'un.

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