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Thread: Pressure cooker recomendation

  1. #1
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default Pressure cooker recomendation

    I am looking to purchase a presure cooker, mainly for meats, stews, etc... I have neverused one before, any reccomendations? I've read where 6qt is about right size for most recepies, but might opt for the 8 as well.
    Right now leaing toward the Fagor Duo.
    Any tips or suggestions would be appreciated.

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    I've had a Fagor Multirapide for several years. The silicone sealing ring is completely worn out but otherwise it's been a winner. They are explosion proof, so all the horror stories you hear about pressure cookers are not applicable. Same for Kuhn Rikon cookers. If I can't get a replacement ring for the Fagor I'll switch to Kuhn Rikon.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I have an ALL AMERICAN cooker the lid locks down and no ring is needed
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

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    Depending on the primary intended use, there's a major sellection in size, type, and manufacturer.

    Is there a chance that down the road you're going to want to do some canning or preserving? Cook much larger recipes for special occasions, etc.?

    I have three pressure cookers, none of which gets used as much as they did back when I did more canning.

    The smallest came to me from friends who used it on the Yukon River and Beaver Creek 30 years ago. It's a 'Skyline' brand, made in England, holds somewhere near a gallon of liquid if filled right to the top (which you'd never do if pressure cooking), and automatically cooks at 15 lbs. pressure. The ring is a fixed-in-place part of the lid, and the lid is somewhat ovalled, fitting -inside- the off-round opening in the 'pot,' and locking via a spring mechanism and cross-bar that stay outside the pot when locked in place.. My friend used this one in camp on their trips, as it could be placed directly on coals from the fire or on a camp stove, and could be used to cook dried beans, roasts, etc. in a very short period of time, permitting for the use of dried staples that otherwise had to be soaked and boiled for much longer periods.. It's small, but for specific uses it's awesome.

    We also have a pressure cooker that's only slightly larger, made by 'Wear Ever', and was originally specifically marketed for deep-frying chicken under pressure. It's called a 'Chicken bucket,' and I have -no- idea where my mother got it years ago when she gifted it to us. It's never really been used much, though it's stout. It also has a unique locking system for the lid.

    The one that's gotten the most mileage has been the 22-quart pressure canner, made by Presto. Decently built, random brand, and nothing fancy, but it's canned a fair bit of black bear meat, salmon, and fruits and veggies, too. Having the ability to do large projects has been the primary reason it's gotten more use than the others, though the Skyline is a seldom used favorite, just for the fact that it does things the other two can't.... such as easily fitting into a vehicle, boat, etc. among camp gear.

    Each one fits its own niche, so I've kept them all, though the Wear Ever chicken bucket is primarily a nostalgia piece at this point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    I have an ALL AMERICAN cooker the lid locks down and no ring is needed
    The question is about a pressure cooker designed for cuisine, not canning. There's a big difference. I also have an All American for canning. I wouldn't cook tonight's dinner in it. Fagor and Kuhn Rikon are light years ahead of pressure canners for stovetop cooking.

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    I have the All American, Fagor and a counter top model made by Cuisinart. For canning meats and fish the All American is the best I've used. For stews, meat, beans and soups the Fagor or Cuisinart are excellent. My Fagor has been collecting dust the last year since I've bought the cuisinart, not because it does anything better but it's an electric counter top model which is convinient and easy to clean and use. Also the rice (3 min to cook) and soups come out perfect every time, in fact I ditched my rice cooker.

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    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Thanks,
    I appreciate the help.

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    A word about Fagor. My silicone ring was bad but I couldn't tell which one I needed for a replacement. Fagor customer service told me how to identify it and I ordered one on Amazon.com yesterday afternoon. I received a shipping notice last night. For under $20 delivered I'll be up and running again. I can't complain about the service on a model that's no longer made. Fagor impressed me with that.

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