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Thread: Predators on the Peninsula

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default Predators on the Peninsula

    Never been predator hunting, I live in Soldotna and I am looking for something new to do. Is the hunting on the peninsula any good or is it more worth it to go north. I really have no experience here, do I need some kind of call? and if so, what is recommended? Thanks.

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    There are a decent number of preds in your area, but the easily accessed ones have PHDs in predator calling tactics. The Penninsula gets hammered by callers so there are a lot of educated critters. I was down that way this past weekend and saw several groups out hunting as well as evidence of lots of previous calling activity. My opinion is you are more likely to have success up north. Good luck.

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    UP NORTH ?????
    and just where "up north" do you think he'll run into fewer callers? Up north for someone from the Kenai, means getting closer to Anchorage & the Valley. I'd guess most Anchorage hunters go south as often as they go north (I know I did when I lived in town). Bet you there are more pred hunters in either location than on the Kenai. I'd look for places close to home, that require leg power to get to - wheeler or snow machine access will get you plenty of company.
    Gary

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Never been predator hunting, I live in Soldotna and I am looking for something new to do. Is the hunting on the peninsula any good or is it more worth it to go north. I really have no experience here, do I need some kind of call? and if so, what is recommended? Thanks.
    You and me both hoose. I need to get out this winter and do some hunting for something other than bunnies. I believe I know some good areas on the refuge for coyote.

    Questions for experienced hunters:
    I am now looking around for a smaller rifle, as I have nothing between a .22 and several .30 calibers. I'm thinking a .243 (which I could also use for caribou) would be about right with smaller grain bullets. Does that sound reasonable?
    What is the best intro calling device?
    Do oversize Tyvek suits (like they use for insulating) work well as camo?
    What is recommended as the best combo scope, or is a fixed power better?
    What types of bullets are preferable; FMJs or hollow points?
    When you get a critter, where do you generally send the hide, and is the tanning costly (my wife is a skin sewer/beader)?

    All these questions are coming from a person who has only hunted for meat his whole adult life, so I am approaching this with naivety. Please pardon the beginner questions.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    UP NORTH ?????
    and just where "up north" do you think he'll run into fewer callers? Up north for someone from the Kenai, means getting closer to Anchorage & the Valley. I'd guess most Anchorage hunters go south as often as they go north (I know I did when I lived in town). Bet you there are more pred hunters in either location than on the Kenai. I'd look for places close to home, that require leg power to get to - wheeler or snow machine access will get you plenty of company.
    Gary
    Gary,
    When I mentioned going north, I actually meant going much farther than Anchorage and the valley, I was thinking more a long the lines of the Denali Hwy, Delta, Glenallen area, I really cannot stand the crowds of the Anchorage/Matsu area. I really know nothing about predator hunting, but one thing I do know about it is, for me, it wont be fun when I am constantly running into people while out hunting. Sorry, this is not meant to be a rude response, just clarifying what I meant by going north

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    I can't help you out down that way. I agree with Gary, walk a bit more and you get away from the lazy guys like me.
    As for Sayak, I have spent a lot of time sitting on frozen ground freezing my butt, as I blew on a call until my lips were numb. I don't have much to show for all those years, but by golly, I'm sure the animals had some good laughs.
    For the animals I've bagged, all but a few I could have (or did) shoot with a 12 gauge, full choke shotgun w/ a load of 4buck. There is not much that can withstand that load. Years back I killed a fox w/ #4 lead, but I would advise heavier than that normally.
    Don't get me wrong, it is exciting to go find a new gun, but you likely have what you need already. I've never used a .22, but it sounds like lots of guys do. I guess in part it depends on where you hunt and how close you expect to see the animals. I've had several pop out of the brush within 15 yards that I never saw coming, but got to see leave in haste. That is more fun than killing them.
    As for a call, go buy a single reed hand held model. Most will make plenty of noise to carry, and you can muffle them with your hand if too loud. Among others I have the Burnham Bros WF-4 wooden model and I think the C-3 plastic long range call. I've also tried the S-2 close range squeaker, but I've never done any good with it. Any of those calls will not break the bank.
    For camo, the Tyvek would work. So would a white sheet turned into a poncho. Primarily I think a guy just needs to be still. Those meat eaters have good eyes and they seem to be able to see through walls. Sit as still as you can. If there are big trees, you might find that your summer camo will work too. Again, call me cheap, but why spend money needlessly?
    As for tanning, I gave my hides to a buddy that trapped, so can't help you as to who, where, or what.

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    Good tips by Ak River Rat. I'd save the gas money and try to stick closer to home. You don't need 200 yard openings to call in animals, or a long range rifle for that matter. Try to find small pockets that give you 30 to 50 yards of an opening and be careful to watch the wind. If you set up in areas like this, be really still and have your rifle aimed in the direction you think the animal will show itself (typically down from the sound). Be really quiet walking in and make sure you have yourself an insulated seat to plop down on in the snow.Get youself a $19 Sceery AP-6, which will make about any sound you'll need to call Fox, Lynx, Coyotes and you'll be all set. Call for a minute or two and then let it rest a bit. Keep this sequence up for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on how long you want to sit and if there is sign in the area. In the small pockets, you gotta be ready for quick action and shooting. Semi auto shotguns excel in tight cover, especially if you happen to get two animals coming in at once.

    Sayak,
    The 243 works good on coyotes, I shot 5 last week with my 243 with a friend's load of 70 grain Sierra Blitz King bullets and they had very minimal fur damage. I prefer to use a slower moving FMJ though in case a Fox or Lynx comes in. I think that Blitz King would have tore up a Fox or Lynx.

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    Default Good follow up SnowCamoman

    Yep, I need to learn that lesson. Keep the gun pointed in the direction you expect company to come from. Silly me to be surprised and not ready when those fox popped up right smack dab where I thought they'd be.
    The pad for the butt is a really good thing. Sure beats standing up and picking ice off of your britches after a 20 minute sit and not being able to feel your own hands due to numb cheeks.
    I've never done it, but I'd think a wing or something tied out front to move in the breeze might be a good thing and give you an extra second to respond. Seems like they see every little movement so whatever you could do to get their attention diverted even a tad bit would help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Gary,
    When I mentioned going north, I actually meant going much farther than Anchorage and the valley, I was thinking more a long the lines of the Denali Hwy, Delta, Glenallen area, I really cannot stand the crowds of the Anchorage/Matsu area. I really know nothing about predator hunting, but one thing I do know about it is, for me, it wont be fun when I am constantly running into people while out hunting. Sorry, this is not meant to be a rude response, just clarifying what I meant by going north
    Not taken as rude at all, but.......
    With the Glenallen & Denali Hwy being roughly between Anch & Fairbanks, I think you'd still be driving a long way to find more competition than you would find locally.
    What I'd do in your case, is hunt beaches & river valleys. If you do have access to a sno machine, so much the better to get away from the roads, but don't forget to leave the machine to exercise your legs.
    Gary

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    Hoose, you and I were on the same page as to the meaning of north. Guess to me north means interior, valley means wasilla-palmer-big lake-etc, and peninsula means Kenai Peninsula. From the Soldotna area the interior really is a long bit of travel. I would focus on the your local area and like everyone else said try to get far off the beaten path. Sayak, most of the Tyvek I have seen used is pretty noisy to move in especially when it gets cold. This is a problem when walking in and even more importantly when you are adjusting your position for a shot. It's true the most important thing is to minimize movement. Good luck.

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    Default second hand stuff

    We did find some old painters overalls one time at Salvation Army. Also got some snow camo cheap at the army navy outlet. Fanciest whites I have is a fleece vest and fleece billed hat with ear flaps the wife got for me. Everything else was scrounged.
    A white butcher's smock or labratory coat would work too. Don't know about the successful guys, but I figure if a predator can see your legs, he should die immediately as he is pretty darn close.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, for the tips. I have a friend who is a science teacher, he is a big guy, and he may have an extra lab coat.
    I was looking at a scoped Savage .22.250 that might be the "cat's meow", though I do have a long tom .12 gauge already. Yes, I have a few trail machines that will get me off the beaten track.

    Do any of you use an electric caller?

    Hoose- sorry if I hi-jacked your thread. I was thinking exactly the same thing this morning after the doctor told me to get my lazy butt off the couch and get some winter exercise. I'm thinking: snowmachine to an area, then take off on webs to a good spot for some calling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Thanks guys, for the tips. I have a friend who is a science teacher, he is a big guy, and he may have an extra lab coat.
    I was looking at a scoped Savage .22.250 that might be the "cat's meow", though I do have a long tom .12 gauge already. Yes, I have a few trail machines that will get me off the beaten track.

    Do any of you use an electric caller?

    Hoose- sorry if I hi-jacked your thread. I was thinking exactly the same thing this morning after the doctor told me to get my lazy butt off the couch and get some winter exercise. I'm thinking: snowmachine to an area, then take off on webs to a good spot for some calling.
    Sayak, sent you an email.

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    Default Get together

    Looks to me like you 2 ought to try a short partnership. What do you have to lose? You both want to try, you both are new, and you may even end up liking each other.
    My electronic call, and guys will laugh, is an old car cassette deck driven by a sealed lead acid battery, and wired to 50' of speaker wire to a big old PA speaker. The deck is in a 6 pack cooler to carry extra tapes and a water bottle. I fill the water bottle with hot water and the set up will run all day.
    You get the idea, I do things as cheap as I can when I can. I'm no wiring genius, but I figured this one out no problem.
    Yeah, the wire gets stiff, and the whole deal can be a pain to move around, but it all fits in a large backpack if I want to walk. Not as handy as one of the new systems, but I have called in animals. Now if I can only find a way to shoot some.
    I do have all the parts to build that unit that somebody posted on here that goes into a thermos. Just have to get motivated to start building.

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    Good stuff. I am taking notes and trying to figure all this out myself. I appreciate all the $$ saving ideas. You sure can blow a wad on e callers.

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    I've built home brew e-callers before, but was never happy with the sounds that I could get for them. You're stuck having to comb the internet for sounds, or record your own. Either that, or you pay for CD's with sounds, which starts to defeat the purpose of saving money on building a home model. Once I went with a manufactured caller and high quality sounds, I started having better luck. It can be a very expensive hobby if you let it become one. Or, it can be a $30 hobby (mouthcall and bedsheet) with whatever shotgun or small rifle you have on hand.

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    camoman, what manufactured caller are you most happy with? are you way into the top of the line ones?

    Also is the fact you can isolate the electronic machine from your position a big advantage? (vs. drawing attention to yourself with mouth caller)
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    I have FoxPros, Minaska's, and Wildlife Tech callers. The FoxPro's have been the easiest to use and most reliable for me up here.

    My home-brew callers were wireless, so I was still able to get them away from me. I'm sure I could go out with the old homebrew model and get animals nowadays, but I think my success with the manufactured models is higher. The clarity from the manufactured models far exceeds my homebrew model too, which may or may not have anything to do with their success. With mouthcalls, you're far more prone to get spotted by an animal than with an e-caller sitting away from you. If you're calling away on a mouthcall and moving the hands, they'll see it. When I'm mouth calling, I try to pick a spot that provides even more cover for me to help hide movement better. With the e-callers, I'll sometimes pick a spot that is more open, but allows me a good sight window to pick off an animal.

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