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Thread: Western Kodiak for "Steep Goats"in November, Brrrr

  1. #1
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Post Western Kodiak for "Steep Goats"in November, Brrrr

    So, this story starts out at the rifle range south of town in Kodiak, I’m out spotting target hits for a friend whom I’m recently getting hooked on the Reloading Craze.
    Waiting for the barrel to cool, Steve takes a look up into the mtns above the range and sees a Mt. Goat up there. As I take a look through his spotting scope, I can literally “Feel the Hook” getting set.

    Mt. Goat, “Right There” and I can now hardly care less about the accuracy of these rounds, I see an animal on the hill and the season for them is wide open……. “I’m gonna make a Goat Hunter outta you yet,” he says, and I can’t stop thinking about it all the way home. Now he’s done the baiting and, “I’m In.” So much to do at home though, so much responsibility………?

    Then, of all things, Our Wives get together and between the two of them, decide,” these guys NEED to go Mt. Goat hunting, in the boat, down on the other end of the Island.” Didn’t need to hear it twice, I always have plenty of work to do but when my wife actually “Suggests” I go hunting, well….. kinda makes procrastination easier.

    We load up his gear, shoot some Fuel in the tanks of my Fishing Boat, some Ice in the Fishhold and we toss the lines. We’re headed for Western Kodiak Island,
    We wait a bit for weather and get a small break,

    Wind Switching from SW25 to Easterly that night and back up to 35 or something. It’s the switching weather that we jump on as a “Weather Window,” So, we run at night, for nearly 12 hours, sleep for a few, and at first light, we are up cruising and glassing the mtns that next day.

    Immediately spotting some Goats but, pretty tough area to access them, and even tougher to recover them. We keep looking.


    The weather is now going NW40, but we are tightly anchored in a famously Solid Anchorage down there, and heading ashore the morning of our second day in the area.
    Ahhhh Ashore, and Welcome to Western Kodiak, “Let’s go up this way”



    Actually it looks tough but is all about scouting your route from offshore a ways. You can always find a good track with minimal suffering through the Alder and Salmonberry thickets on Kodiak. But you do need to scout it and plan wisely or you will get thoroughly whipped by this stuff in short order.

    Just as we are breaking out of the thickest stuff, we run into this Very Cool Discovery


    This may stretch the story some but I couldn’t stop adding these pics, Steve trying to see the back of this Kodiak Bear Den.


    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  2. #2
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Nice Home, with a Great View

    Look at all the grass that has been hauled in there, it was a foot thick at least.
    The inside temp was a full 20-30F higher than outside without the opening covered by snow.

    What a home, with a priceless view



    We find a good Deer/Bear trail up the mtn and are fairly quickly slipping along the backside of the ridge we had seen Goats hiding behind.



    Did I say Hiding?

    Yes from the WIND which is now whipping up this back side so hard we are, now and then, needing to crouch down, lowering our center of gravity just to stay on the mtn.
    I have felt the strength of recorded 100 knot winds in the Bering Sea before, where it seemed you might actually be picked up and thrown off the boat by the Gusts and this was similar. We both commented later it was very borderline traveling on the actual ridge top for fear of getting literally thrown over the edge by the wind alone.

    Now I gotta say, I am a Rookie Mt.Goat Hunter, but Steve, my partner is not.

    A relatively new forum member (ALPATFLTMECH), He’s A USCG Helicopter Flight Mechanic, and very much, one of those “Dialed In” types. It showed in his hunt prep and gear selection.

    One of those guys who has you wondering if you’ll be able to keep up with him, as opposed to the other way around. A good partner to be showing me the ropes on this new animal. I learned a lot hunting with him, for sure.

    “How cool is that?”




    Last edited by stid2677; 11-15-2010 at 21:56.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  3. #3
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default "Goats, Right Here !"

    As we’re traveling up the ridge, I’m totally focused on getting above the main body of animals we had seen from the boat. Briefly glancing back to make sure we were still close together in the wind and steeps, I see Steve motioning me to come back and stay low, “There’s some Goats, right here!”

    We checked them out a bit, a Nanny and young Billy.

    Snapped a pic that turned out to be a great shot for differentiating between the two sexes, nanny on the left with thinner bases to her horns. Most noticeable to me throughout the hunt was either the base width or the sweeping outward appearance unique to a Nanny. Hers also tend to come up straight then curve back a little toward the tops while a Billy’s Horns have a gradual curve throughout resembling a Banana.

    In the Hunt prep, I had studied several Forum threads on this subject, also grabbed the ADF&G test booklet as I was fairly convinced I wanted a Billy only, for herd management reasons.
    The F&G booklet was excellent and I felt it was quite clear during the hunt. Not really that hard once you start to really get a look at the Goats

    So we continued on down the ridge looking for a big Billy for Steve and something like a 4yr old for myself

    As we near the area above them, we don our Tyvek Whites (got the tip Stid, thanks) and carefully approach from the top down.


    Just over the ridge top Steve whispers, “There’s a Brown Bear down there !!”
    We could hardly believe it, watching a Bear actually stalking the same Mt. Goats we were after !!

    At one point, I watched him hold the pose of a pointer, left paw off the ground, nose out peeking around a corner for a several minutes without moving. Amazing.
    Sure enough the Bear spooked the Goats and it was not long before our hunt was over for the day, well, almost,

    As we watched them head to the next mtn and an unapproachable cliff face, a few were lagging behind. So we thought, let’s try these suits out and standing up boldly, we walked towards them.

    Steve noticed one of them, actually coming back up toward us. It was a Billy, so we pulled back and got ready, to see how far he’d come.

    So there I am, sitting position, perfectly ready, When he rises into view in front of us, at twenty yards !! First, two horns appear above the grass, followed by the innocent face of a young Billy Goat, then he stops with just his chest and neck visible above the grass.
    I have the crosshairs on the base of his throat, he’s mine to take, or not.

    But, he’s too young, I feel it immediately, so we watch as he turns away, apparently deciding that a couple of Goats with rifles just does not look right. That was an awesome experience, and I had no regrets at all, for a while…….,

    “It’s the first day, don’t want to end it all that quick, right?”
    As the hunt wore on though, well, I was still convinced it was no mistake, but also decided I was on an “Any Billy” hunt from here on out.

    Steve’s taking more time looking for an older Billy with Top of the LIne scope and glasses.
    We retreated to the boat for a nice evening in strong winds but on a solid anchor in good protection.
    Really Appreciating the Boat Base part of our hunt during the long 14hour nights of November as well as the howling wind. That old diesel fired Dickenson stove makes for some good warming up, drying out, and sound sleeping.

    Smell of Bacon, Blk Bear sausage, and Eggs in the morn also is good….


    Day two, we wake to the site of those Goats still safely up on a totally inaccessible cliff face, so decide to take a look at the other side of the bay. Looks good but nothing on this windward side, well, upon ascent, nothing on the other side either.



    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  4. #4
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Long Day with some Mama Brown Bear Excitement

    A long day it would have been except for a few minutes of serious excitement including Steve’s first Handload Kill and, ……..well, I’ll detail that story in another thread on Brown Bears and “Dinners On Boys,”(to be posted within a day or two, look for it, was very amazing). Here’s a Teaser,


    Day three of the hunt, we go for a cruise, it’s forecasted for more NW wind to 40 knots today so we are sneaking along the coast and into another drainage completely, after four hours of running in the night.

    At first light we see some Mt Goats up high, pretty easy climb up a ridge to them and, figuring there’ll be more up there, we are looking to drop the anchor and go ashore when Steve spots some hunters silhouetted on the ridge beneath the Goats we are watching.
    Deciding it would not be cool to add to the pressure, even though there is a lot of good country behind them, we turn south and move on. They were the only other hunters we saw the entire time beside a party dropped in the first bay we were in who looked to be Bear hunting, having set up a major spotting scope out front of their tents just up from the beach.

    Steve made that call, not sure I would have been that cool, (two other hunters in the bay?) must be a Southern Boy courtesy thing (yeah, he’s Florida, but man did I mention, that guy can spot stuff like crazy ?, and nice to the other guys too ? Yep, Southern).

    Turned out well for us tho, this is Kodiak Island after all, not the Haul Road I’ve read about. Tease tease

    So, We travel for an hour or so, and find ourselves underneath yet another Goat laced mountain face. We count eighteen up there,
    Dropping the anchor and waiting for morning, now determined “we need to get some blood on our hands, tomorrow.”

    Can you see up them up there? We are targeting the goats on upper left of the peak. There is somewhat of a gentle slope beneath them as you’ll see later.


    We again, are anchored securely, but that night was crazy as it was blowing NE50 and sounded like hurricane force gusts were roaring down the mountains and hammering the boat.
    All was well in the morning as the front had blown through and we headed to shore determined.

    The plan, I’m going to take the first Billy I see and we figured possibly Steve would still have a shot at undisturbed Goats further around the mtn. He’s not looking for just any Billy but a wall hanger, so taking more time to look at them. We have several days left to stay down here, but something is hitting the dirt today, Day 4

    We have a great plan for a stalk after studying the mtn from offshore the previous afternoon.
    We quickly ascend into Goat Country and there are Goats everywhere. We dawn our Goat Suits and clamber quietly up to the ridge to come on them from above and behind the main ridge.


    The Southern side we were glassing had lulled us a bit, maybe. We discovered, as we began dropping just over the ridge to come up behind and above the Goats, that we were into a completely different terrain, from sun covered grassy south slopes to North face barren rocky slopes with a dusting of snow mixed with ice among the rocky steeps.

    Slipping up the ridge out of view of the Goats was not possible without dropping down a ways to the north side and deciding which draw we thought would hold the most Goats then re-ascending to take a look.
    As we made this move a couple times, each time realizing again, how much more difficult it is to descend than to ascend on the crumbly rock faces that characterize the island steeps of Kodiak, especially mixed with snow, caution was at Max level.

    My one advantage was the “Whippet” trekking pole I had recently bought for this hunt. Learning from, and responding to information gathered on the Forums concerning Steep Mountain Navigation with winter coming on fast,


    I considered the ice-axe head Trekking Pole a Key Idea and so had found one on a quick jaunt thru Anchorage the week before. $99 at REI (sorry folks, I got the last one ) and
    that tool exclusively did more for my safety than anything else I had. (Thanks AKLanche, &Becca, we’re getting smarter as result of your story)

    I did stick with my Danner Mtn Boots, left the Extratufs on the boat for the high mtns and dry Northerly weather we were enjoying, and those Danners performed Excellently as well, to put it mildly.



    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  5. #5
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default "RL-17's Wham Effect," on nice Billy, and He's Down......

    As we neared the best draw to anticipate Mt. Goats on the other side I topped out and could only see a Nanny and Kid down the slope a ways.
    I was just ahead of Steve so signaled to him we would have to go down and around one more draw. Yet, as I tried to descend, I quickly decided it would be more risky to go all the way down to where Steve was, I should instead slide along closer to the ridge top without dropping down as far. Steve continued as we had been doing and I lost sight of him.

    I slid up, barely out of view of the Nanny below, for a ways, then was out of options, either top out and continue on up the knife ridge to get in view of the next draw or simply drop onto the southern side and be clearly in view, certainly spooking everything on the entire face of the mountain face.

    I decided to trust my Goat suit, act like a Goat, as in, move small amounts at a time and do a lot of stopping, “to graze,” then continue on in a non stalking attitude.
    I crawled up onto the top of the ridge and could see the Nanny watching me. I had no option so just moved on up the ridge, very slowly, very patiently.

    Still Steve is not in sight below me, but it’s really steep and I didn’t expect to see him until he topped out beyond and above me, into the draw, holding what we hoped were the Goats we were targeting.

    I finally rounded a small rock and “there they are,” unsuspecting, not looking my way, I have them right where I want them. But the Nanny below, has focused her attention on me at this point. I can’t do anything but wait for her to relax. She doesn’t , but isn’t spooked either, just watching.
    Somehow, I think this Goat Suit thing is really working.

    Above, and in front, I can see at least two Billies, several other Goats bedded, and then another Billy rises into view from behind a ridge. He looks relaxed and is walking towards me, approx 150yards away. I glance peripherally down at the nanny.
    Having heard somewhere not to look them in the eye as they can read into that and feel threatened by it, I believe it. So I just side-glance down and she is moving now looking like she is beginning to relax.
    Then back up at the Billy, looking large now as he closes a few steps at a time clearly checking out the surroundings of this new draw he has entered, then he stops and is watching the Nanny below who is watching me.

    So I just wait, then notice she is relaxing finally, and now, so is he.

    I have slowly moved my rifle from my pack (all this on the back side of the ridge which is narrow enough that as I lay straddling it, I can roll my pack off to the left side, then remove rifle, and pull rangefinder from my hip belt all without any movement visible to the Goats. I have become ready to kill as I wait,
    (PS. this is not the same ridge but similar to the knife edge we were working on)


    Now, as the Billy is feeling comfortable, walking down into the draw toward another bedded down Nanny much closer to me.
    I slide my rifle, up and into a perfectly braced prone position nearly completely hidden by the six inch high grass on the ridge top. I slide the rangefinder up and get a 102yd reading. He’s still coming.

    I am on the “Any Billy” mode and this one is obviously a nice healthy one, the bases of his horns look really beefy, in fact they are downright thick. He is a shooter for sure.

    It hasn’t been long, but I still don’t know where Steve is and am figuring he is planning to top out right to the north of this Billy and it may be very soon, possibly spooking him in the process.
    Figuring, this is as calm as I can imagine this Mt. Goat to be, and that he is continuing to walk straight towards me, seemingly offering himself up, I decide this Goat is, “the one.”
    By now all the Goats in the draw and below me are totally relaxed, I have become one of them apparently, or am totally invisible to the others.

    He stops behind the bedded Nanny and gets a whiff of her perfume and is now standing perfectly broadside to my crosshairs set on 4 power, it seems he fills the scope, it’s perfect.

    No surprise squeeze, it’s deliberate, “right there, behind the shoulder crease,” a Sharp Crack is heard by all across the draw.

    I don’t see the impact as usual, possibly due to the thick hide and hair flowing in the breeze, but that Billy Goat just buckled at the knees, and went straight down, right there, rolled a few times and stopped in a little bed on the steeply sloping grass. Yes, that’s a done deal there !

    Launched at 81 yards, a Powerful testament to the Sako .270wsm sending Nosler 160gr Partitions, riding on 60gr of RL-17 Smokeless Powder into 2,933 feet per second of WHAM !!


    But, I watch, another round chambered, not moving, no standing or shouting, silently, I watch, and wait……
    In all our scouting it was very clear we needed to drop the animal as immediately as possible, no running, no excess alarming if at all possible to aid in the recovery routes down the mountain.
    So I waited in hiding for maybe a full minute and watched, just his head rising a little, then a little movement in the front legs,
    Awww man, I better anchor him with one more round. He’s in such a perfect spot. Crack/Boom again, and then,

    Oh No,…… Man,…… Nahhh, …..Doggone It,….. I watch, as he does one last kick with his front legs and he’s out of that bed and starts to roll, and head over heels, flip and roll and on out of sight down into a deep ravine .
    I hear his huge body thumping into the rocks for a while longer.

    I think, “I just may have made a fairly major ‘Overkill’ move there.”



    Minutes later Steve tops the ridge but behind and below my position, we watch carefully as the other Goats are really not spooked much and maybe the hunt is still on.
    He says something about getting into trouble descending back there and I understand completely. Should have probably stuck with him closer but it just wasn’t possible. We both wish he could have been there for the shot.

    As I start getting amped to get into recovery mode he spots another nice Billy up and to the Northeast, in a really nice spot, slowly walking away, he’s a shooter but by how much? I range him for Steve at 172yds and he tries to get a better look.
    Deciding in a hurry, is this possible, is it wise, is it the Billy he is looking for?
    I mention the 20kts of cross wind as I give him another range of 190, we both know as my next read is 212yards that this is a solid shot for his Weatherby and handloaded 220 gr Hornady’s,
    this rifle is dead on, Steve’s been layin’ ‘em right in there at the range, that’s a dead Goat, but,
    All things considered, he holds off,

    He’s probably still thinking about that opportunity as I am writing a week later. I know I am, but we had a Mt. Goat down, he had gear to overnight on his back and could have made a sound decision to take that Goat but, he wasn’t desperate and we couldn’t get a really good look at it,
    "Heck we have more days of hunting, to go so," he pulled back.
    Whew, those are tough decisions to make.

    As it turned out, in my gutting, skinning and packing out of the Goat I had down that ravine, continuing on thru the next morning I am fairly sure the smell wafting up the draw moved those Goats out of there. The next morning (tho we had seen Goats up there early) I was climbing up beneath them to finish the packing while Steve climbed up to ambush from above, but he found, "no Goats to be seen."

    I found my Billy 350 yards down from the first shot, the gully he fell down was so steep that at one point I could see both the Goat down 100 yards below me and could turn around and “rangefind” the top of the ridge 250 yards above from the same point.


    It looks pretty hairy but was not as bad as all that, just a real steep descent on big rocks, hard on the knees, but very doable with patience.
    I used a ‘Stranger in a strange land’ trick for the hide, after filling my pack, I wrapped a pretty good load in a tarp, hide and some tools, twined it all up tight and just drug it behind.
    Actually, rolling it ahead down the steep slopes, worked really great (well not quite so great in the Alder thicket at the base of the mountain) but saved me a full trip packing, felt pretty smart too not having to pack it on my back.
    Thanks for that, Strange.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  6. #6
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Nice Runnin' at night Return, Just in Time, Tho

    This is the entire mountain, you can see the killsite at very top just to the left and the possibility of a fairly decent recovery, the chute I had to come down is not really visible, but you can see what it dumps out into.

    Those gorgeous Alder. Really a good plan tho that worked well, well except for the second shot, and the roll.


    My favorite part of every hunt, the easy part of paddling out to the big boat to a Hold full of Ice for the meat and a fine meal, dry stuff, and Diesel Power for inexpensive return home.



    So, I better stop writing somewhere, next day, remember we have plenty of time to hunt? (Well that’s always a maybe down here,)



    We rise to a beautiful Sunrise off the stern, but we hear a two day Marine Weather forecast of Storm Warning out of the East, which is absolutely not a good direction for our return.

    So, we yanked the anchor and got out of there. Again, cruising at night, Pushing the throttle up a little to “Get There,” ahead of the Storm winds.

    Drinking strong Espresso , thick with Cream and Sugar, and dining on Potato Chips all night,
    we cruised past the lights of Old Harbor, and then the Rocket Launch site off Narrow Cape.(sorry no pics of the beautiful shorelines of the SouthEastern side of Kodiak but it was sure calm in advance of the Storm)

    We turned the corner at Cape Chiniak at 5 something in the AM and drove on toward the aircraft warning lights atop the wind power generators up on Pillar Mtn. All the way into the harbor.

    Down at the office that morning, to start catching up, Nah, I crashed on my “allnighter” Couch til Noon Thirty. Knees wrapped in ACE Bandages...

    Couple days later the F&G sealer takes a look at this skull and horns and writes it all down for me, 10” Horns, and 5 7/8”bases. Counts out 6yrs for the age. She keeps remarking, “This is a Nice Billy !”

    I think the broken cheek bone from the fall just adds to a Euro mount with a story to tell


    So then I can’t help but wonder,

    I took Steve down specifically to get away from competition for big Goats on the road system, and see another great part of the Island, other than from a Helicopter,

    He chooses not to fire probably partly as a result of my having an animal down already,
    The mtn gets cleared off as a result of my messing around with a killsite, I’m on “take the first Billy you see mode” we’ll get a bigger one for Steve.

    Then weather shuts us down…….
    You know, what’s up with that?

    Then as my wife hears the whole story, she tosses out one of those joke lines, you know the kind we really LOVE them for….?

    “Well, Sounds like ya killed your buddies Goat….” Ha ha ha ha
    Hmmmm, well,
    "Nah, He's got a better one ahead of him, Sure of it....."

    ALL THAT, HANGING ON THE FLIGHT OF A BULLET, AND A LITTLE WIND,

    Don’t ya just crave the unknown of it all, out there ?????

    So, yeah, Steve is back out with his bow, hunting the Road System as I write, Hard at it, but he did get a heck of a tour of the Western end, and I learned a lot.

    There's a BIG Mountain Goat up there, waitin' for him.....
    I'll Prophesy It, but He's gotta go get it..... and with sticks now.....


    Kodiak Island is one great place to be a hunter, I know He’d agree.


    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member B&C 04's Avatar
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    Awesome Story!!! Congrats on the hunt, a great adventure and Billy to go with it.

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    Wow, great story and pics. Felt like we were there with you. We'll all be waiting for the sequel! Thanks for taking the time to put it all together.

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    KODIAKRAIN, what a hunt! What a story!
    As I found the story I was half way thru my first cup of coffee. By midway reading my cup was empty but could not force myself to get up and get a refill. You had me hooked and I had to finish reading.
    Not only are you a great hunter but you have the skill to write up the story. Great job. Can't wait to hear about the BEARS. I would like to give you a rep point for this one. Keep us abreast and be safe.

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    Wow,man you are good!!A+ write up and stunning pics to go with.Nice goat, way to go.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    AL as usual love the write ups and pics... great job again.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    That was a tremendous read.

    You have a great gift in your story-telling and take some fantastic pictures.

    And that goat is an incredible trophy.

    A ten inch goat? Doesn't get much better/bigger than that!

    Nice job and hope your buddy finds one that suits him.

    Sounds like a great trip with a good hunting buddy.

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    Great story and excellent job writing it up. Nice billy too! Looking forward to the 2nd part of the story.
    Congrats on the hunt, I'm jealous. Sure do miss hunting Kodiak, great scenery and lots of game.
    BK

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    Another great read! Did you use crampons? Everytime I read about a goat hunter falling on Kodiak I want to buy some crampons.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHUNTINFOOL View Post
    Another great read! Did you use crampons? Everytime I read about a goat hunter falling on Kodiak I want to buy some crampons.
    Good Question,
    We both had them along, Steve had a Full depth set in his pack and I don't remember him using them.
    I had bought a set of smaller tooth ones, "Micro Cleats" I think they are called, (from Orions in Kodiak)

    I chose the smaller ones as I felt the longer tooth kind are actually hazardous in anything less than Full Ice or Snow cover.

    We were in country that was very rocky yet had snow patches and some ice, interspersed with the rocks. Classic weakpoint conditions for crampons in both our opinions and so neither of us used what we had brought.

    Still a Very Good idea to have them, they are easy to slip on and are essential gear for Kodiak high country I think, especially as winter progresses.

    The MAIN DANGER of Kodiak steep country in my opinion is the Unstable (or read it "Crumbly") Rock Composition. Gotta be very wary of that at all times.
    I'd guess that is the reason for most falls on Kodiak, as opposed to Ice or even slick vegetation.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Al,

    Great writeup and pics once again, really enjoyed it! Congrats on the goat.

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    Great write up, great pictures, great adventure. Thanks

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    All I can say is wow. Thanks for taking the time doing such a wonderful write up and sharing with the rest of us. Congrats.

  19. #19
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

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    Congrats on a fine looking billy and a great write up!!! Best of luck to Steve on getting his goat!!

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Anchor Town
    Posts
    30

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    Nice job! I'm gonna reread the story again when I have a little more time tonight.

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