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Thread: 223 Remington/Twist Rate/Bullet Weight Question

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    Question 223 Remington/Twist Rate/Bullet Weight Question

    My Grandson has a Weatherby Vanguard Youth 223 Remington. The 20" barrel has a 1-12 twist rate. I have some 70 grain round nose Speer Hot Cor Bullets. Do you think there is any chance that this rifle will stablize these bullets? Since they are round nose I was thinking that they might since they are shorter than the spitzers. What do you think? I'm going to try loading some of them anyway so what should I look for, wide groups, keyhole marking on the target? Thanks for any opinions or information.

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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    Q. What twist rate do I want for my rifle?
    Probably 1:9, but it depends on what kind of bullets you intend to shoot.
    Special purpose rifles often have uncommon twist rates. For example, if you are building a varmint rifle and want to shoot the short 35 grain, 40 grain, and 50 grain bullets, a 1:12, or even 1:14 twist would be best. On the other hand, long range High Power shooters often select 1:8, 1:7.7, 1:7, or 1:6.5-twist barrels to stabilize the long 77, 80 and even 90 grain bullets used for 1,000 yard competition. Additionally, new testing of heavier rounds (68-77 grains) seems to show that they perform very well in simulated tissue and may be a better defensive choice than 55 grain or 62 grain rounds. The majority of shooters, though, typically shoot bullets of 50 to 69 grains in weight (note that the 62gr SS-109/M855 bullet is as long as a 71 grain lead core bullet) and should select 1:9 twist barrels. At typical .223 velocities, a 1:9 twist will stabilize bullet lengths equivalent to lead-core bullets of 40 to 73 grains in weight.
    1:12 twist rifles cannot stabilize SS-109/M855 bullets and 1:7 twist rifles are slightly less accurate with lighter bullets and will often blow apart the thin jackets of lightweight varmint bullets. The 1:7 twist is used by the military to stabilize the super-long L-110/M856 tracer bullet out to 800 yards, but unless your plans include shooting a significant amount of M856, the 1:9 twist rate is better suited for general use.
    There is, of course, an exception: if you want to use loads utilizing the heavier, 75-77 grain match bullets currently used by Spec-Ops troops and other selected shooters, you'll want a 1:7 twist barrel. Although military loadings using these bullets are expensive and hard to get, some persistent folks have managed to obtain a supply, and will need the proper barrel twist to use them. Anyone who foresees a need to shoot this ammo should consider a 1:7 twist barrel.

    http://www.razoreye.net/mirror/ammo-oracle/

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    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportdog View Post
    My Grandson has a Weatherby Vanguard Youth 223 Remington. The 20" barrel has a 1-12 twist rate. I have some 70 grain round nose Speer Hot Cor Bullets. Do you think there is any chance that this rifle will stablize these bullets? Since they are round nose I was thinking that they might since they are shorter than the spitzers. What do you think? I'm going to try loading some of them anyway so what should I look for, wide groups, keyhole marking on the target? Thanks for any opinions or information.

    Yes.

    Speer has loads listed in the #12 manual for the 223. Their test gun had a 22" bbl with 1-12 twist. The highest velocity load is 27 grains of Winchester 748 (max) that yeilded 3068 fps. Starting load was 25 grains at 2824 fps. Good luck.

  4. #4
    hap
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportdog View Post
    My Grandson has a Weatherby Vanguard Youth 223 Remington. The 20" barrel has a 1-12 twist rate. I have some 70 grain round nose Speer Hot Cor Bullets. Do you think there is any chance that this rifle will stablize these bullets? Since they are round nose I was thinking that they might since they are shorter than the spitzers. What do you think? I'm going to try loading some of them anyway so what should I look for, wide groups, keyhole marking on the target? Thanks for any opinions or information.
    Maybe...

    Using the Greenhill Formula backwards it takes a maximum bullet length of just over 3/4" or less to stablize at 3000fps in a 1:12. I do not have a bullet to measure, but that should cover it if you can get it fast enough and it is short enough...

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    A quick length measurement of some bullets I've got laying around: No Speer .224

    Win. 64 gr. 0.804"
    Hor. 60 gr. 0.760"
    Nos. 60 gr. Part. 0.790"
    Barnes 62 gr. TSXBT 0.942" (1:7 to 1:9 twist rec.)

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