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Thread: Best handloads for the 375 Ruger in Alaska? (Ruger Hawkeye African)

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    Member Silver Tip's Avatar
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    Talking Best handloads for the 375 Ruger in Alaska? (Ruger Hawkeye African)

    What are the best 375 Ruger handloads for use in Alaska...260/270 gr or 300 gr?? If I handload my 416 Rem with 350 gr bullets (@ 2540 fps) I can achieve the same ballistics trajectory as the 300 gr 375 Ruger loaded @ 2725 fps. At 250 yds both bullets are about 4 inches low. Not bad at all. That way I can shoot either rifle the same. "Point blank range" would be 250 yds for both rifles. About the only difference is the 416 Rem is a pound heavier.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    African model in .375 Ruger with 300 grain TSX. I use 80gr of RL 17 which pushes the 300gr at 2660ish. 81gr is very hot so start bellow 80gr and work up with due caution. Just picked up an Alaskan for coastal BB, so I literally haven't started loading for it yet. I'll start with 300TSX and work with RL 17. Not sure about charges yet. Marshall who posts on here has one and has done well with RL 17. The prolem is other powders shoot well, but don't get you to stated velocities. RL 17 does.

    Brett

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...SX-RL-17/page2

    This is Marshall's findings for 300TSX with RL 17 out of the .375 Ruger Alaskan model. 81.4gr seemed to be the winner.

    Brett

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    I loaded the very same load that Brett advised, for my 375 Ruger Alaskan. Got the same results that was posted and was dead on accurate. I could not be happier with the gun or load. One shot for my brown bear this spring.
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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Adam Barringer View Post
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...SX-RL-17/page2

    This is Marshall's findings for 300TSX with RL 17 out of the .375 Ruger Alaskan model. 81.4gr seemed to be the winner.

    Brett
    Hi Brett,

    It's been about a year since I worked up the RL-17 load with the 375 Ruger. I've gone out a few times since then to confirm the load with the change of seasons down here in Arizona. RL-17 is holding true to claims and seems to be temp stable. So far differences in velocity between 75 and 110 degrees has stayed within 30fps, that's about 1% of final load velocity. Fluctuations could be attributed to a variety of other variables.

    I'm glad to hear the 23" barrel on the African worked well with RL-17. Case fill is right at 100% and perfectly suited for the 375 Ruger.

    Knowing what I know now I would stay away from RL-15 and use H-4350 if RL-17 isn't available. The RL-15 data that I have recorded fluctuates a lot with temperature swings.

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    Member BrentC's Avatar
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    Don't forget the 270 TSX loaded with RL17 either. I found a great load for my African at 83.7 grains. I also found that the 260 Accubond shoots great with 84.0 grains of RL17.

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    is there much difference between the 270gr tsx and the 300gr tsx as far as felt recoil and trajectory. if the 270 would reach out a little further, that would be nice but if it isn't much difference then will prob go with the 300.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kobuk View Post
    is there much difference between the 270gr tsx and the 300gr tsx as far as felt recoil and trajectory. if the 270 would reach out a little further
    I'm not sure that it would "reach out a little further", but it would be flatter which would make long range shooting easier. That said .375s aren't suppose to be 400 yard guns. Most anything that NEEDS/WARANTS a .375 one would hope shooting distances would be within 200 yards. At those distances I'm not seeing much of a trajectory difference. More velocity....yes. Not sure about the recoil. I've only ever shot 300 grainers out of any .375.

    Brett

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    This may help:

    A 375 Ruger with 30mm medium rings have a sight height of 1.65"

    Using that data along with measured velocities and BC information the following trajectories have been comfirmed in my rifle with my loads.

    270TSX sighted 2.6" high at 100 yards does the following:

    200 +1.6"
    300 -5.9"
    400 -21.7"

    300TSX sighted 2.7" high at 100 yards does the following:

    200 +1.3"
    300 -7.3"
    400 -24.6"

    At no point with the above 100 yard sight in does the bullet exceed 3" high on it's path.

    If sighted in with the 270TSX and you shoot a 300TSX it will hit on center line but 1.2" low at 100 yards. A simple scope adjustment, 5 clicks up with mine puts it were it needs to be.

    The 300TSX has more energy everywhere but the muzzle at my loaded velocities.

    270TSX / 300TSX

    muzzle 4869 / 4856
    100 yards 3957 / 4004
    200 yards 3190 / 3278
    300 yards 2544 / 2656
    400 yards 2005 / 2133

    There are factors other than velocity and energy but the 300TSX will drive deeper than the 270TSX and pretty much match the trajectory if sighted in as stated above. Either bullet will kill any you shoot with it. My rifle likes either one but really shines with the 300TSX.

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    I helped a buddy load his factory 375 Ruger Alaskan. His gun shot the 270 tsx's at just about all velocities at about an inch at 100 yrds. We had about the same groups with 71-73.5g RL 15, COL out of the barnes manual at 3.300. It took one time to the range to find the right hand load and we have not looked for another. We did load some rounds with head space problems and the bullets did not chamber too well. I don't know if this is a common problem with this gun or if we just need to bump the neck a bit more. My buddy opted for factory ammo and shot 2 bears with Hornady cup and core stuff. The bears he shot sported large softball sized holes with many little lead fragments and core separated bullets. They are dead, but we both agree the TSX likely will be a better choice for the 375. I have heard others that shoot the Alaskan that it has been a forgiving factory rifle and shoots quite well out of the box.

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    marshall
    thanks for all of your information. it is so nice to hear from someone who has spent all of the time, money and note taking that you have. it saves someone like me tons of trial and error and gives me a great starting point.

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    I helped a buddy load his factory 375 Ruger Alaskan. His gun shot the 270 tsx's at just about all velocities at about an inch at 100 yrds. We had about the same groups with 71-73.5g RL 15, COL out of the barnes manual at 3.300. It took one time to the range to find the right hand load and we have not looked for another. We did load some rounds with head space problems and the bullets did not chamber too well. I don't know if this is a common problem with this gun or if we just need to bump the neck a bit more. My buddy opted for factory ammo and shot 2 bears with Hornady cup and core stuff. The bears he shot sported large softball sized holes with many little lead fragments and core separated bullets. They are dead, but we both agree the TSX likely will be a better choice for the 375. I have heard others that shoot the Alaskan that it has been a forgiving factory rifle and shoots quite well out of the box.
    daved
    just curious why your buddy used factory ammo after you loaded up the 270 tsx? was he not confident in the tsx? or did the factory shoot a little more accurate?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    We did load some rounds with head space problems and the bullets did not chamber too well. I don't know if this is a common problem with this gun or if we just need to bump the neck a bit more.
    You have basically solved your own problem. It is a head space issue and you need to run the die down just a touch to bump the shoulder, not neck. If in doubt just bottom out the die on the shell plate and full length re-size.

    Based on your bullet selection and your claimed loaded length it is not an ogive bumping the lands issue unless your throat wasn't reamed. That isn't the case or factory ammo would not have loaded without similar issues.

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