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Thread: DG475 - Been there, done that?

  1. #1
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    Default DG475 - Been there, done that?

    A buddy and I drew Mt Goat on Kodiak. We're debating two options right now. Fly in to Larsen Bay and get ferried in by skiff and then hoof it from there or fly in to a mountain lake and hike in from the lake. We're hoping to combine some deer hunting with the goat, but goat is the main target. Any of you guys that have done this hunt have an opinion about it. We already have some pros and cons to each, but thought it wise to learn from others experience. We've both hunted and killed goats before and are capable mountain hunters. My biggest issue is I don't want to bust through alders if I don't have to, but I like the option of being picked up by boat if we need to move to another area.

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    fly to the alpine lake for sure
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Search

    Do a search and type in DG475. You will find several posts from people that have been there and you can PM them. I have contacted several members and they were very helpful.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  4. #4

    Default agree

    I agree with powder monkey....chances are you will not have to relocate, there are plenty of goats down there.

  5. #5

    Default 475

    Only 3 lakes in DG475 and all are wind critical. I'd plan on spike camping no matter what.

  6. #6
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Exclamation Zachar is thick with alders

    I flew into Lake 629 last year for a goat hunt with my brother, and all my preparing wasn't enough. The plan I had for getting on the ridge to the South failed. We got stuck in alder thickets like none I've ever been in before. Well over my head, thick, inter-twined, and we couldn't find a route that wasn't vertical with anything less than about 3/4 mile of alders. We searched out three different routes while covering many miles to no avail.

    The ridge to the North of Brown's Lagoon has a lot less alders on its South facing slope (a key point, we saw North slopes were much thicker than South slopes), but that ridge also gets a lot more hunting pressure from what I learned. I paid a little more to get a fly over the area, and I saw plenty of goats, which had me excited. But, we never managed to get up to them in four days. Then we called for an early pickup before the coming weather socked us in. We barely made it out as weather set in. We went the end of Sept, and it was still thick too. Only saw a few deer, and they were all does. No bears seen. You'll face bad alder thickets if you do an approach from ocean level. Get in the best shape ever (I can't imagine the pain if I wasn't in shape), and be ready to seriously suck it up. Next time I will know there is no tough route, and I'll spend a whole day going up the really tough route through the alders. In all our searching, we probably spent twice the energy that we would have spent going straight up. I don't mean to scare you away, but we spent a grande to learn. Get serious. Be prepared, good gear, good boots, walking pole, leather gloves (salmon berry bushes are thick too), pack as light as safe, bring high energy food, and expect rain and wind. Plenty of water available, but have a high quality filter. Good luck!

  7. #7
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Exclamation Zachar is thick with alders

    I flew into Lake 629 last year for a goat hunt with my brother, and all my preparing wasn't enough. The plan I had for getting on the ridge to the South failed. We got stuck in alder thickets like none I've ever been in before. Well over my head, thick, inter-twined, and we couldn't find a route that wasn't vertical with anything less than about 3/4 mile of alders. We searched out three different routes while covering many miles to no avail.

    The ridge to the North of Brown's Lagoon has a lot less alders on its South facing slope (a key point, we saw North slopes were much thicker than South slopes), but that ridge also gets a lot more hunting pressure from what I learned. I paid a little more to get a fly over the area, and I saw plenty of goats, which had me excited. But, we never managed to get up to them in four days. Then we called for an early pickup before the coming weather socked us in. We barely made it out as weather set in. We went the end of Sept, and it was still thick too. Only saw a few deer, and they were all does. No bears seen. You'll face bad alder thickets if you do an approach from ocean level. Get in the best shape ever (I can't imagine the pain if I wasn't in shape), and be ready to seriously suck it up. Next time I will know there is no tough route, and I'll spend a whole day going up the really tough route through the alders. In all our searching, we probably spent twice the energy that we would have spent going straight up. I don't mean to scare you away, but we spent a grande to learn. Get serious. Be prepared, good gear, good boots, walking pole, leather gloves (salmon berry bushes are thick too), pack as light as safe, bring high energy food, and expect rain and wind. Plenty of water available, but have a high quality filter. Good luck!

  8. #8
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Smile More on Zachar Bay

    Hi Tater, Obviously I didn't need to provide you the basic prep advice as I now see your postings in the Sheep Judging thread. If you are considering Lake 629 or Browns Lagoon, I can share more if you want including a few pictures of the terrain.

    I see you guys were thinking about the combined deer possibility too. Most folks I've talked to (including air charters) had almost no success with deer (bucks) until November in that area, or if just meat hunting for does, after Oct 1st. I was surprised I didn't see more deer sign where we were hunting, but it kinda validates what others were saying. Most said the deer move off the alpine and into the alders by early Sept, but until the snow pushes them down more, they won't venture much below the alders. A lot like elsewhere on the road system.

    Mike

  9. #9
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks to all who replied. Its given me enough info to start working some plans. HuntKodiak, I sent you a PM.

    Mike

  10. #10
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    Default Lk 629

    We also did 629 towards the end of October last year. Went up the south slope behind the lake for 3 nice billies. There are some interconnecting meadows that will get you close, but there is still the dreaded vertical alder climb. It's funny how you can cuss an alder one minute for impeding your progress and then praise it highly the next for saving your life by giving you something to hold on to as your slipping and sliding.

    Took us about 2-3hours worth of steady brush busting to get above the alder line. After that you pretty much need to ridge out to get around. The billies we were after stayed in a nasty area. Then it snowed 12 inches and got rather cold so we aborted our mission and looked for deer.

    We shot two nice bruisers but they were the only ones we saw the whole 9 days we were there. I would have to say the odds of making it a combo are pretty slim. I didn't think there could be a place on Kodiak so devoid of deer, but there is. It was a great trip none the less.

    Brett

  11. #11
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Default Which slope?

    BR,

    When you said that you went up the South slope, did you mean the South facing slope that is North of the lake, or the North facing slope that's South of the lake?

    Got any pictures of your goats?

  12. #12

    Default All Kodiak Goat Hunts

    Most Kodiak goat hunters shoot very few deer and that is a fact. The main reason is most busks are moving into lower elevations (brush that is) during Sept. and most goat hunters are not able to pack a deer down in addition to the white prize. I have cussed and throw rocks at big bucks coming down from a mountain when packing a big load of goat meat. It's cool to dream during the winter to think about getting a billy and a nice buck, but most folks at the time have to focus on the task at hand.

    Plenty of big billies in 475, but the weather has to work with you.

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