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Thread: Yurt before cabin?

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    Member billy jack's Avatar
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    Default Yurt before cabin?

    Thinking of putting up a Yurt for the time being until I can build the cabin I want on my property. I was thinking that I could build a foundation on stilts, 6x6 pilings in cement about 5-6 feet off the ground so as to keep the bears out of it w/ a single set of stairs or a ladder going up to it. Looks somewhat cheaper and alot faster than a cabin at this time for me. The cabin I want to build is gonna be about 12000-15000 in materials, and I'm about 20 miles west of Kashwitna so I'll have to bring in loads w/ my utility sled. A Nomad shelter http://www.nomadshelter.com/ looks like a good alternative for me at this point in my life. A pot belly stove and cots around. Anyone live in one of these, if so how did you like it? I think that they are cool looking. Looking at the 16' model.

    Thanks Billy Jack

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    The cost, time and effort will detract from and slow your goal. Much better off, putting your money and effort into your final product imo. There is no easy cabin. Focus on your desires and don't go astray, if you want to achieve it.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    I built a 8'x10' shed to start out. I insulated the shed and put in bunk beds (made from plywood and 2x4). I installed propane lights and propane heater (a ecotherm). It was a nice place to stay warm and dry. After completing the cabin, you can use the shed for storage or guests if you want. We were able to finish the shed in about a weeks time. I can't imagine trying to build my place with out a place to stay in first.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qkayak View Post
    I built a 8'x10' shed to start out. I insulated the shed and put in bunk beds (made from plywood and 2x4). I installed propane lights and propane heater (a ecotherm). It was a nice place to stay warm and dry. After completing the cabin, you can use the shed for storage or guests if you want. We were able to finish the shed in about a weeks time. I can't imagine trying to build my place with out a place to stay in first.
    I can see a shed like this being handy and having use beyond the build time. That said a yurt like mentioned would be a much larger undertaking. On the yurt I a inclined to agree with Res.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    You need a floor for the yurt and that takes just as much structure as a cabin. I know two people that live in yurts full time and both say that without the heat melting the snow off them they would not hold up to a big snow load. While Nomad brags about their toughness, 60#/sq ft. snow load rating is not enough for a structure that you don't keep an eye on daily. One of my friends lived in a yurt for a couple seasons until she came home to find that a black bear went through it like butter. At $6500 for the yurt, plus shipping and the floor materials, you could easily build a 16x20 cabin for the same price.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qkayak View Post
    I built a 8'x10' shed to start out. I insulated the shed and put in bunk beds (made from plywood and 2x4). I installed propane lights and propane heater (a ecotherm). It was a nice place to stay warm and dry. After completing the cabin, you can use the shed for storage or guests if you want. We were able to finish the shed in about a weeks time. I can't imagine trying to build my place with out a place to stay in first.
    We did an 8X8 and it was a tad small for 4 people. Fully insulated and OSBed on the inside. Heat it with a candle. Now it is storage etc.... If you prebuilt trusses and had all your wood laid out, it would go up in a day to 2 days, metal roof and all.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    60 psf is not enough for the area you are in Billyjack. I am in that general area and I'd plan on 100# snow loading. Especially if you wont be there much in the winter... I agree 100% with the 8 x 10 shed idea. Or build the shed and then add the cabin on later and use the 8x10 as an arctic entry...

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qkayak View Post
    I built a 8'x10' shed to start out. I insulated the shed and put in bunk beds (made from plywood and 2x4). I installed propane lights and propane heater (a ecotherm). It was a nice place to stay warm and dry. After completing the cabin, you can use the shed for storage or guests if you want. We were able to finish the shed in about a weeks time. I can't imagine trying to build my place with out a place to stay in first.
    Yep, thats the way I'd do it. A shed is always useful at the cabin.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by qkayak View Post
    I built a 8'x10' shed to start out. I insulated the shed and put in bunk beds (made from plywood and 2x4). I installed propane lights and propane heater (a ecotherm). It was a nice place to stay warm and dry. After completing the cabin, you can use the shed for storage or guests if you want. We were able to finish the shed in about a weeks time. I can't imagine trying to build my place with out a place to stay in first.

    Hah! We went with a 12x16 shed to stay in until we build the cabin. That was 5 years ago and we are still staying in the "shed" and it might be a while for the real cabin. 5-6 feet off the ground isn't even going to slow a bear down. Plastic walls aren't either.

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    Hah! We went with a 12x16 shed to stay in until we build the cabin. That was 5 years ago and we are still staying in the "shed" and it might be a while for the real cabin. 5-6 feet off the ground isn't even going to slow a bear down. Plastic walls aren't either.
    LOL.....you sound like me....the cabins done!!!
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Starter shack or cabin

    I would go with 8x12 or even 12x12 starter, then convert to storage after cabin is complete. That was my first plan but I skipped the small starter cabin. Almost 2 years later and Cabin still a work in progress.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    Hah! We went with a 12x16 shed to stay in until we build the cabin. That was 5 years ago and we are still staying in the "shed" and it might be a while for the real cabin. 5-6 feet off the ground isn't even going to slow a bear down. Plastic walls aren't either.
    It took me 2-3 years to get out of the shed. For awhile there, I thought I would never get out of the shed.

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    I'll give ya a clue so you don't waist product cargo'd in to build this shed being a retired home builder. Plywood is 4 x 8 normally. Design your shed/Temp cabin in 4 foot incraments so you don't waste plywood cutoffs. 4', 8', 12',16', etc X 4', 8', 12', 16' etc. ... Do the math and make all you haul out to your site count. Dumb to burn up 2' cutoffs in your fire pit when the woods are full of firewood.
    Another option when you build your cabin: do you have timber onsite? If so, buy a small mill and cut your own wood. Many have done this. Sell the mill when your done. JMO
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    GrizzlyH, any recommendations on a small mill?

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKFishOn View Post
    GrizzlyH, any recommendations on a small mill?
    I saw a cool little deal at the Alaska State fair in Palmer year before last, but don't remember the name of the company that built the machine. It was geared and built for the bush builders in mind tho. I watched the demo's with it and figured I could build a cabin in the bush with it if I ever wanted too. Of course it all come out rough cut, but what the heck for a cabin. Pretty cool little unit and looked easy to transport. Maybe others on here saw it also and can remember who sells it. I don't think the price was too out of reach, but don't remember that either as I wasn't shopping for a mill at the time. I'm just a mechanical geek and had to see the demo..........lol
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Here is my guest cabin we started it as a shed, but converted it to a guest cabin once we realized how much work building remote is. I'm waiting until my boys are old enough to help before we start the main. I think shed/guest cabin is the way to go to get away from the bears ASAP.
    cab tent.jpg

  17. #17
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    Hell, if ya want bear proof, pull a 40" conex up the river in the winter. They won't get into that when you ain't there. Tuff for vandals too unless they have a torch on there snomo...........JMO............lol
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The labor it takes to fell trees and saw them up into lumber easily outweighs the pain of hauling stuff in with a snowmachine if you have decent snowmachine access.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Doug hit it. Unless you have unlimited time and a strong back, it is much faster and easier to haul in your materials. Precut your boards. You can go 1/2 sheet and use the other half on the other side with no waste.

    If you have not hauled materials VIA snowmachine remember that it goes really fast after you do a couple trips. Pick the easiest path. Once it is packed down you can really travel. I used the lake as it was the flattest, fastest surface to go in on.

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    I I had to do it all over again, I would still build the shed first with some minor changes. I would build 4 foot panels and haul it in and screw them together. This would have saved me alot of time out there.

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