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Thread: Blaser RS8

  1. #1

    Cool Blaser RS8

    Hello,

    Does any one know anything about The Blaser RS8 or have any postive or negatives coments about the rifle.

    I am considering buying one but I need to know the pros and cons of the design.


    JAZZ

  2. #2

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    They are the replacement for the r93. I have an r8 in 338 win mag. I haven't had a chance to shoot it yet, but I'm sure it will be typical for a blaser. Blasers are boringly accurate. They always shoot well.

  3. #3
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    Ive been shooting an R93 Tactical since we became a dealer. Boringly accurate. Awesome customer service. Advanced technology. And if you do it right, cheaper than the 6 or 7 rifles it can replace.

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    Member Robertesq1's Avatar
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    My R93 308 is my only rifle that shoots all 180 grain the same.

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    There is a Blaser forum online, think it is called Blaserbuds or something like that and those guys offer a ton of usefull information. In my limited search for purchasing a Blaser found out the prices seem to be set in stone. But if you call some of the bigger dealers and talk to them in person there is some wiggle room. Most owners love em and the one I handled was slick as heck. I'll most likely buy one soon but it will be used as the price drops a considerable amount.
    Tennessee

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    Member chriso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    In my limited search for purchasing a Blaser found out the prices seem to be set in stone. But if you call some of the bigger dealers and talk to them in person there is some wiggle room. Most owners love em and the one I handled was slick as heck. I'll most likely buy one soon but it will be used as the price drops a considerable amount.
    I looked long and hard for a used one to save some bucks on, but the ones I was able to locate were pretty close to the prices for new over at WWG. I whined a bit and Ken eventually let me buy mine one piece at a time... after about 3 years, I had a complete rifle at home in the closet and the wife was none the wiser

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    One curse of any straight pull design is the lack of the camming power you have in a turn bolt gun. Never an issue until something sin't perfect - you get a bit of crud in the chamber or the case sticks due to a slight overload or soft brass or something. In the same area cartridge dimensions can be a real issue esp. if you handload.

    In a perfecct world a straight pull would be great but in real life shuff happens. Minor annoyancies on the range become a real problem in a life or death situation. I believe the Swiss were the only military to use a straight pull rifle as standard issue but then again they never had to fight a war either.

    Complexity of manufacturing is another con - this con quickly tranlates into cost. For most of us cost is a real concern; if it isn't for you disregard this issue.

    On the pro side the Blaser design make for a short action that is fast to operate as long as the rounds feed and eject with no sticking. You also have the interchangeable barrel thing although an extra barrel probably costs more than most us pay for pretty nice complete rifle. Accuracy is reported to be great but I wouldn't expect any less if I plunked down that kinda money!

    Not knocking the Blazer - just pointing out some of the pros and cons of the design as you requested.



    Quote Originally Posted by j*** View Post
    Hello,

    Does any one know anything about The Blaser RS8 or have any postive or negatives coments about the rifle.

    I am considering buying one but I need to know the pros and cons of the design.


    J***
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  8. #8
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    Pros to a Blaser:

    - Safety - The safety cocks or uncocks the firing pin. Just like a hammer gun = nice and safe with round in the chamber

    - Fully nitride coating = no rust

    - Barrel is hammer forged around mandrel = blueprinted lands, chamber and headspacing. No room for machinists error, instrument error, tool wear.

    - Integral scope mounts ensure scope is mounted correctly on longitudinal axis of barrel.

    - Longer barrel length for same overall length of gun = You can use a slower burning powder to reach same velocities as on a shorter barreled gun with less perceived recoil.

    - You can swap from right to left or from .338 to .458 in a few minutes. How practical is this? I dunno ... But it is cool.

    Cons:

    - Bolt handle is a little short compared to a M70, Mauser, or a Weatherby. It isn't bad but when you have fingers the size of mine and are wearing light weight poly gloves it isn't so good either. I like the bolt handle to slap me in the palme as I work it.

    - Price - It is high but you aren't going to get a custom rifle now days for less than 3-4k anyway. And that is what it will take to get a rifle that will shoot a 20 shot string 3" group at 300 yards. The secret to Blaser is in the barrel manufacturing proccess. My advice is read up on it.

    - It ain't controlled round feed. This is a big one in my book. But Finn Aagaard shot the heck out of African game with a post 64 non CRF M70 in .375 H&H. So it might not be totally neccessary.

    Hope it helps.

    I too was leery of "straight pull actions." But not any more

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    Hammer forging the barrel isn't that much of a big deal or "secret"- Steyr has used it for decades and my old classic stainless Mdl 70 also has a hammer forged barrel - I wasn't aware of this until I happened to read the hanging tag that came with it. If I recall FN makes all their barrels this way. I'm not sure about the chambering however although a carefully machined chamber in a custom gun should not be an issue.

    The controlled feed is a major issue with me as it was all the major and most minor armies of the world when they used bolt guns. Someone may have used a push feed in Africa but remember that Bell killed hundreds of elephants with a 7x57. How your or I or anyone else can screw up under stress is what controlled feed is all about.


    Quote Originally Posted by needcoffee View Post
    Pros to a Blaser:

    - Safety - The safety cocks or uncocks the firing pin. Just like a hammer gun = nice and safe with round in the chamber

    - Fully nitride coating = no rust

    - Barrel is hammer forged around mandrel = blueprinted lands, chamber and headspacing. No room for machinists error, instrument error, tool wear.

    - Integral scope mounts ensure scope is mounted correctly on longitudinal axis of barrel.

    - Longer barrel length for same overall length of gun = You can use a slower burning powder to reach same velocities as on a shorter barreled gun with less perceived recoil.

    - You can swap from right to left or from .338 to .458 in a few minutes. How practical is this? I dunno ... But it is cool.

    Cons:

    - Bolt handle is a little short compared to a M70, Mauser, or a Weatherby. It isn't bad but when you have fingers the size of mine and are wearing light weight poly gloves it isn't so good either. I like the bolt handle to slap me in the palme as I work it.

    - Price - It is high but you aren't going to get a custom rifle now days for less than 3-4k anyway. And that is what it will take to get a rifle that will shoot a 20 shot string 3" group at 300 yards. The secret to Blaser is in the barrel manufacturing proccess. My advice is read up on it.

    - It ain't controlled round feed. This is a big one in my book. But Finn Aagaard shot the heck out of African game with a post 64 non CRF M70 in .375 H&H. So it might not be totally neccessary.

    Hope it helps.

    I too was leery of "straight pull actions." But not any more
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Good points

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    Bolt handle is a little short compared to a M70, Mauser, or a Weatherby. It isn't bad but when you have fingers the size of mine and are wearing light weight poly gloves it isn't so good either. I like the bolt handle to slap me in the palme as I work it.
    Merely have the LRS large sniper bolt knob installed

    It ain't controlled round feed. This is a big one in my book. But Finn Aagaard shot the heck out of African game with a post 64 non CRF M70 in .375 H&H. So it might not be totally neccessary.
    The extractor, which is "Sako" style (or HK91 style) is huge and has a spring as thick as Mark Begich's skull when confronted by issues we care about.

    One curse of any straight pull design is the lack of the camming power you have in a turn bolt gun. Never an issue until something sin't perfect - you get a bit of crud in the chamber or the case sticks due to a slight overload or soft brass or something. In the same area cartridge dimensions can be a real issue esp. if you handload.
    If you are going to have a problem with chamber crud or cartridge dimensions, you will know it before you hunt since it is "harder: to chamber a bad round than it is with a turnbolt Case overload...well ya got a problem then....but I have a tool in my bag to handle those scenarios....two man job though

  12. #12
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Well, several things that seem like advantages to me are: The bolt locking in place via a collet rather than lugs. This provides equal pressure all the way around the bolt. Second, the bolt mechanism is covered. With most bolt guns, you can get crud around the bolt just from walking through snow covered alders. Their rifles are a very good try at doing a lot of calibers well. Nothing is perfect though...
    The big disadvantage to me is the price. Go to Blaserbuds or Blaserpro and look at the classifieds. You can get a feel for the real costs of the barrels, scope mounts, etc.

    My .02 worth.

    Matt M

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    a pic of my 93:



    just got a new 338 w/m bbl and trijicon 1x4 (thanks Alex at europtic.com)

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