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Thread: boat paint/covering

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    Default boat paint/covering

    ok guys i have an 18ft monark flat bottom and just got a new motor so i wana fix her up a little over the winter my question is what would you spray inside or out to help seal the hull it dosent leak bad just some bad rivet repairs by the old owner i was thinking truck bed liner but im not sure how much weight that would add its a riveted boat so whatever it is its gota have a good bit of flex to it you guys have any ideas.

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    Member Ryan B's Avatar
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    I have heard Gluvit from West Marine is a good product to seal leaks including the seams around the rivets. I haven't used it yet on my boat but will once I get to that point in my project. I plan on applying it on the inside under the floor boards due to not wanting the amber color when it cures to be on the outside of the boat. I haven't heard of any reason it can't be applied to the inside as of now.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    You can have 5% pigment added of any color if that is a concern. Home Depot added pigment for me at no charge. Just be sure they use a color formula for adding to a clear base. I nor the person adding pigment realized that the fromula she used was for a white base and what was supposed to be gray ended up black. Just beware that you must inform them or the results won't be as desired.

    Aluminum galls rather easy and doesn't slide across rocks very well. It is my understanding that Gluvit is used on the exterior to also aid in slipping across rocks. I will be finding out first hand this summer since I put it on the bottom of the drift boat I just refurbished.

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    Member Ryan B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBighorn View Post
    You can have 5% pigment added of any color if that is a concern. Home Depot added pigment for me at no charge. Just be sure they use a color formula for adding to a clear base. I nor the person adding pigment realized that the fromula she used was for a white base and what was supposed to be gray ended up black. Just beware that you must inform them or the results won't be as desired.

    Aluminum galls rather easy and doesn't slide across rocks very well. It is my understanding that Gluvit is used on the exterior to also aid in slipping across rocks. I will be finding out first hand this summer since I put it on the bottom of the drift boat I just refurbished.

    Thanks AKBighorn. I looked at you drift boat again, nice job. I could live with a black or grey on the bottom of my boat. I will have to get the pigment added to mine, since the ability to slide over rocks is never a bad thing.

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    My dad and brother in-laws all run drift boats in OR and all their boats have gluvit on the bottoms. They swear by it. When wet that stuff is so slick. The only thing they mentioned was on their first application they used rougher grit sandpaper on the whole bottom so the gluvit could adhere to something. They reapply it every three years whether it needs it or not. These guys run a load of customers down the rivers 3-5 days a week all summer so those hulls see alot of gravel and they are in great shape. Just my .02 worth.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akscotty View Post
    ok guys i have an 18ft monark flat bottom and just got a new motor so i wana fix her up a little over the winter my question is what would you spray inside or out to help seal the hull it dosent leak bad just some bad rivet repairs by the old owner i was thinking truck bed liner but im not sure how much weight that would add its a riveted boat so whatever it is its gota have a good bit of flex to it you guys have any ideas.

    Maybe zolatone???????????????? Most boats or newer ones come with this stff already sprayed in it, it is pretty much the same thing as the spray in bed liners for trucks. If you don't want it rough, you can get a clear coat finish for it as well.

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    that gluvit looks like the ticket i dont know much about painting but you say you can add color pigment to the gluvit and how do you apply the stuff do you spray or brush.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Its an epoxy so I'm not sure how well it would spray. I didn't want to have to clean it out of the gun. I rolled it on with a paint roller and it worked just fine. Here's some information http://www.marinetex.com/gluvit.html...lication-35882. It was stated that you could add up to and not to exceed 5% pigment per volume of Gluvit.

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    yea i think that is what i am going to go pull the motor off cut out the old transom weld in a new one sand the paint off and gluvit the bottom and as high as i can up the sides with the 8lb can do you do multiple coats or all of it at once.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I applied 2 coats. Typically multiple coats are always better than one thick coat.

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    I called the old man over the weekend and he says he brushes on the gluvit. He's real particular and uses a couple layers and runs his brush with long strokes lenghtwise with the boat. His opinion is if the finish doesn't come out perfectly smooth then any imperfections will be running lenthwise and won't affect the hulls effeciency in the water. Makes snese. The other thing he insists on is no one touching the gluvit to make sure its dry between coats. He's sure it will leave a skin oil spot that the next layer won't adhere to and that is where a peel spot will start. Little things like that seem to make sense but will make a difference on the water this summer.

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    ok so i sand all the paint off the hull wipe it down with thinner a couple times the brush the gluvit on length wise let it dry and dont touch it then add another coat do you need to use any kind of metal etching stuff before painting.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    It's all in the link above but here ya go

    Repairing Leaky Aluminum Hulls:
    Leaky seams in aluminum hulls can be difficult to seal. Gluvit is an excellent leak sealer and barrier coat for all types of surfaces. This waterproof epoxy flexes with hull or deck movements to resist the cracking or “checking” associated with typical epoxy systems.

    Remove all contaminants from repair area with solvent or a strong detergent cleaner. Sand the area with 80-100 grit sandpaper to provide a profile for adhesion, then wipe with clean dry rags. Apply a coat of Gluvit with brush or roller at 6-8 mils and lightly tip with a foam brush to smooth surface if desired.
    I chose to use thinner to clean the hull after sanding. If your not familar with mils you can pick up a cheap mil scale about anywhere they sell paint. Not really worth messing with imo though, if it looks thick it probably is. Generally these types of coatings can be built up thicker but there really isn't much use in doing that to your boat. Thicker isn't necessarily better.
    Last edited by AKBighorn; 03-08-2011 at 18:20. Reason: addition

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    AKBighorn is right. Don't go thick. Just a couple thin coats. My brother in-law snads with 320 grit just lightly enough so you can feel the slightly roughed up surface then uses a squirt bottle of denatured alcohol. Once the surface is wet he uses an air hose to blow the grit and alcohol off. He does it a couple times then applies his first coat of gluvit. He says two coats has done him really well.
    I have a 14 ft aluminum riveted fishing boat I plan on doing the same thing to. The two coats should seal up my rivets and provide a nice slick boat bottom. It's always worked for our drift boats so it should do well on the little lake boat too.
    Good luck with your project AKScotty. If you need help I'm here in Fbks. Send me a PM and I'll come over and help.

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    ok thanks guys and thanks for the offer tealer i may take you up on it if i have problems.

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    Can this be bought locally?

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    Not sure what locally is for you (city) but West Marine has it in Anch. and CAC Plastics has it in the valley for a couple bucks less.

  18. #18

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    trustworthy hardware in soldonta has it it works well my dad drift boat is 21 years old now and has had it done a few times like fish rite said when we got it if you arent hit rock you aint runin river

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