Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 61

Thread: How meticulous are you?

  1. #1
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,555

    Default How meticulous are you?

    I'm taking a break from handloading at the moment, and I was curious how many other handloaders are as meticulous as I am.

    Let me explain: The army demands a lot of my time, so I don't get to go shoot nearly as often as I'd like. As a result, I can afford to take my time loading to produce the most consistent loads possible. I am still using the same Lee single-stage press I started with when I bought the anniversary kit years ago. I often break out the dial-caliper to make sure my cases are sized equally, and I measure each powder charge individually with an electronic scale for every load I put together. I started this practice when I discovered certain powders don't meter consistently through the Lee powder measure that came with my kit. (Particularly Hi-Skor 700 X, which I'm working with now.)

    I'm in the process of loading 50 45 Colt loads with new Remington brass, Remington #250 large pistol primers, Stoner Hardcast 200 gr. SWC bullets and 6.0 grs. of 700 X.

    Loading this way takes a LOT of time, but I enjoy it. I use a Lee dipper to pour the powder into the dish on the electronic scale, then use the funnel I got with the anniversary kit to pour it into the case. I flare the cases only enough to allow the bullet to start, and check about every tenth case with the bullet I'm using to ensure I'm getting a consistent flare.

    So while I allow my shoulders to loosen up, I thought I'd post this question to find out what kind of loading styles are out there. If you are a seasoned veteran with a high-end progressive unit, feel free to post up. I may be there eventually myself.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    one at a time... though i do now use an electronic measure...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    248

    Default

    How's the man-cave coming along? I bet it seems cozy with the current weather.

    I started using an RCBS automatic powder dispenser/scale. It is AWESOME! It's a big investment, but worth it.

    I also started using a dillon 550b progressive press. I still verify powder weight, flare, and OACL every ten rounds or so. I have been sizing and priming the brass separately on my rockchucker. So far it seems to be working well, and it really speeds things up.

  4. #4
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sthrcave View Post
    How's the man-cave coming along? I bet it seems cozy with the current weather.

    I started using an RCBS automatic powder dispenser/scale. It is AWESOME! It's a big investment, but worth it.

    I also started using a dillon 550b progressive press. I still verify powder weight, flare, and OACL every ten rounds or so. I have been sizing and priming the brass separately on my rockchucker. So far it seems to be working well, and it really speeds things up.
    LOL, you seem to have more expendable income to put toward loading components than I do. Then again, I have a few more kids than you. I think I'll have to use you as a resource for advice when it comes time to upgrade my loading equipment. I have researched the electronic powder dispencers, and I think that may be my next big purchase in reloading equipment. It's a toss-up between that or a Hornady Lock-N-load sonic case cleaner.

    The man cave is still there, and I still spend quite a few hours there meticulously loading round after round after round. ;-) Incidentally, I was planning to go shooting today, but the weather prompted me to go pick up the aforementioned bullets instead to try a new load for the 45 Colt. It just means I'll have more shooting to do next time I make it out.

    Are you ready to go after some predators this winter?

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  5. #5

    Default

    I am very meticulous, and slow. I consider it a precision hobby, versus mass production. I mainly load bottle neck rifle cartridges and enjoy trying to find what powder/bullet combo shoots best in a particular rifle. I honestly don't know if I shoot so I can reload, or reload so I can shoot! I enjoy both immensely, but don't get in a hurry with either. Most non-reloaders who have been in the shop and watched me reload say something like this, "I don't have the time or patience for that".

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    515

    Default

    AKsoldier,
    Well to answer your question yes and no. Now that helps alot. I load rifle ammo at or near the max. I load all of it on a rcbs rockcrusher I got when they first came out. Weigh all the loads on an old beam scale and always keep the brass seperated, trimed, cleaned everything. On the other side of the bench sits a dillion 550 used to load lots of light pistol rounds to just plink with. Here I mix and match cases and once in awhile check them all but outside of that I just load and pop them. It is all based on the type and purpose of the load. Loading is fun and I get can the most out of it by doing both ways.

  7. #7
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Even a brief look at my loading bench will give away that I am meticulous in my reloading. However, that does not mean I weigh every charge. I've an electronic scale/powder dispenser by PACT that is great for load development work, but a powder measure (RCBS Uniflow, Redding BR3, Harrell, etc.) is the way to go for almost any other reloading IMO. Spending time prepping brass and sorting components can be a good investment in handloading; weighing every charge is not. ± a couple tenths of a grain of powder is not going to affect your accuracy in a measurable way. If you don't believe me, give it a try and see for yourself. I dote on precision in my ammunition, but a quality powder measure will deliver results equal to weighing every charge and do it in a fraction of the time.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  8. #8
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    Even a brief look at my loading bench will give away that I am meticulous in my reloading. However, that does not mean I weigh every charge. I've an electronic scale/powder dispenser by PACT that is great for load development work, but a powder measure (RCBS Uniflow, Redding BR3, Harrell, etc.) is the way to go for almost any other reloading IMO. Spending time prepping brass and sorting components can be a good investment in handloading; weighing every charge is not. ± a couple tenths of a grain of powder is not going to affect your accuracy in a measurable way. If you don't believe me, give it a try and see for yourself. I dote on precision in my ammunition, but a quality powder measure will deliver results equal to weighing every charge and do it in a fraction of the time.
    This is the kind of input I was looking for. I was hoping for justification for the eventual purchase of an electronic scale. 1Cor 15:19 - Thanks for your comments.. I have read enough of your posts to know that I can trust your contributions.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    591

    Default

    My loading method depends on the cartridge. Right now I'm loading a bunch of .454 casull.
    I deprime using a Lee universal deprimer. Then I throw the cases in the tumbler. After the tumbler I clean the primer pockets. Next I run the cases in the expander die just enough to take off any crimp that might still be there. I do this because I don't flare my cases. If I size first, I sometimes will still have a slight crimp on the case mouth, making it difficult to start a bullet in the case. I then run the cases through the sizer die. I'll measure the cases next for length. If needed I trim. Deburr if needed. Hand prime. I use a powder measure (same reason as 1Cor15:19). I then seat the bullet. And then crimp in a separate step. Alot of steps but I enjoy it.
    By the way I don't use the expander die on the 454 so I have nice grip on the bullets. I've measured my brass before and after the expander die. I get better bullet grip without it. Care is needed when starting your bullets into the case.
    I use a Redding turret press and a RCBS rock chucker.
    The picture below is the Redding with the 454 dies
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails press.jpg  
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  10. #10

    Default

    Depends on what I'm loading. In your example with 6 grains of 700X, a moderate load of a "medium" pistol powder, I only use my scales to set up my powder measure, then I just dump directly from the measure into the cases. Small variations in charge aren't going to affect accuracy much and aren't going to run you into over-pressures. This speeds ups loading a bunch, but you need to recognize that I regard these loads as "plinking" and practice loads. I only weigh each charge if I'm going for high pressure/high velocity.

    I'm loading similar charges and bullets to yours in 44 spec and 44 mag for plinking and general use, and I load them in lots of 500. I built some little open-topped plywood boxes 12" x 12" x 4" and use them a bunch. I carry one filled with loaded rounds to the range, then drop the fired rounds into an empty version as I shoot them. Once the lot is fired up, I keep the empties in their box till loading time. Back home I might get all or part of them resized in one operation, but it doesn't matter. Do it as I can. Same for decapping and flarring, and same again for priming. Once the lot of cases is all primed, I only drop powder as I have time to seat bullets.

    It's amazing how many rounds you can go through if the box of cases (in one loading stage or another) is always sitting next to the press. I can sit down and load for 5 minutes or an hour, depending. If I was only working with 50 rounds, I doubt it would take me more than half an hour to load them. Call it 10x that, 300 minutes or 5 hours and probably less, to load a lot of 500 cases.

  11. #11
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hey! If I look thru this empty beer bottle, I think I can see Russia from here!!!
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Loads intended for hunting… very meticulous.

    Loads for plinking, target practice etc. not meticulous…
    For pistol loads like 45 colt, I deprime and resize, run them thru the vibrating case cleaner for an hour or two, forgo the primer pocket cleaning, case trimming and deburring, and simply bell them. Drop all my powder charges with a RCBS little dandy powder measure and then seat and crimp the bullets… done deal. Note that I only load cast lead bullets so case length is not really all that critical. If you are loading jacketed bullets you may have to trim. Otherwise just leave your crimp die loose in the press and once you get the hang of it and how the “feel” you can give the die a twist one way or the other as is needed to keep from squarshing the case without going thru the trouble of trimming them all to the same length.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    All rifle and pistol loading: brass is segregated by headstamp and times fired (this is how I manage case length, among other things). If I work up a load with a given lot of brass, I don't use that load in another lot of brass. I gave away my tumbler to an OCD friend, so no brass is cleaned. Primer pocket residue lightly scraped clean by a suitably-sized flathead screwdriver bit, as I've found that the RCBS brush sold for that purpose is too agressive.

    Rifle:
    Loads weighed individually when working something up. Once settled on a load, the measure is set to suit and charges are dropped without weighing. Charge weight verified maybe every 30 rounds or so, and maybe not.

    Pistol:
    All loads dropped after setting scale. Charges verified every 50 rounds or so. I don't see a need to measure anything that's been run through the sizer, and the flare die is set to the absolute minimum flaring needed to seat a bullet.

  13. #13
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,216

    Default

    I have a room dedicated to hand-loading. Two loading benches. One RCBS Rockchucker and one RCBS single stage press I bought new from the Herters catalog in 1974. Two case trimmers, Plus a shot-shell reloader I Never use.
    I now have a RCBS Charge-Master electronic scale (very sexy) and powder dispenser. Plus one electronic scale and two balance beam scales. I have two dial calibers and one digital caliber.
    Most of my hand-loading is experimental and thus very precise.

    Every now and then I will knock out a couple hundred rounds of 45acp or 38-40 and for those I use known loads and maybe just my regular powder thrower. Then I weigh a few at random to make sure all is well in Powderland...

    But for working up experimental loads or super accurate target loads, I measure and weigh everything... I sort my brass and bullets into weight groups as well. Then I keep groups of brass separate so I can track how many times they have been re-sized.

    For Rifles like my Swede CG-63 target rifle or my 300 Win Mag tactical , I keep that brass separate again since I only neck size for those rifles.

    Proper Hand-loading is a great stress reducer...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Meticulous? Nope, not me. I'm the Dillon 550 guys that gets somebody to help so I can go faster. I measure a few drops of the powder measure to make sure it's safe. Measure case lengths and manually inspect empty brass in my free time to make sure they are safe. Other than that we rock and roll. For hunting rounds and load developement I might take a little more time, but 95% of my reloading is for semi-autos for fun. To date, my finest 22-250 groups came from a Dillon 550 batch of 50 that I did do a little load developement on my single stage press first. Goofy thing is, the 50 rounds out of the 550 shot better than the hand measured single stage loaded rounds. Reloading for me is the process of producing safe ammo that meets factory rounds for less money.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  15. #15
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Meticulous? Nope, not me..
    ya know i seen ya post to this thread ... and immediately wondered how you would qualify it....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  16. #16

    Default

    I have been using the same Rock Chucker for 35 years and hardly ever pinch my fingers anymore. I used to go really fast and every once in a while my left hand that was feeding the fodder got out of sync with my right hand that was running the ram up and down. Yes sir I can remember one time it made me pee down my leg a little. Now that I'm kind of an old fart I've slowed down a whole bunch. I just turn the radio on in my little room under the stairs get me a sody pop and tune the world out and become one with that old green press with half the paint wore off of it. I use the RCBS powder measure and a 1010 beam scale. Nothing fancy in my reloading room at all.

    I posted some time back that I had just emptied a 5 gallon bucket that was full to the brim with spent primers that had been punched out with that old Chucker. I can only wish I had enough life left in me to fill it again.

    I am pretty meticulous with my loading except for one aspect. When I am loading for coyote hunting I pay little attention to detail. All of the shooting is jump em, run and gun shooting. Its figuring lead, maintaining the swing and the rest is a hope and a poke and more times than one would think those coyotes run right into the bullet. For this reloading I buy all once fired brass and could care less whats written on the case head. I then fill them full with 4831 powder and shove a 70 grain Hornady down the hole with the pointy end up. Once in a while I grab a handful of this hodge podge and shoot a few rounds into a group on paper(usually after I've missed a few easy shots and think something must be off and usually it ain't). My Ruger 77 will usually shoot these mix and match loads into an inch and a half and thats good enough!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    I'm VERY Meticulous.

    Mainly, because I don't wanna get Blowed Up.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  18. #18

    Default

    I am extremely meticulous and go into great detail in preparation of brass, weighing all my components and then separating them into groups. I give a lot of specific attention to the putting together of the load chain from making sure my charge is consistent to the granule and making sure bullet alignment in dies is absolutely straight and that bullets are not quickly pushed into the brass neck especially on compressed charges. I do this with pistol, revolver and rifle loads.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  19. #19
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I am extremely meticulous and go into great detail in preparation of brass, weighing all my components and then separating them into groups. I give a lot of specific attention to the putting together of the load chain from making sure my charge is consistent to the granule and making sure bullet alignment in dies is absolutely straight and that bullets are not quickly pushed into the brass neck especially on compressed charges. I do this with pistol, revolver and rifle loads.
    That sounds about like me. I don't weigh my brass though, I just make sure head stamps and number of times fired, as well as length are all the same for each lot. I'm guessing you are "the" beartooth, as in beartooth bullets? If so, thanks for a great product. I've used them with very good results in my 450 Marlin, 460 S&W and 45 Colt.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  20. #20

    Default

    No, I am not with bearthooth bullets. I have for about five years been posting most of the time on the Alaskan shooting forum.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •