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Thread: For those hunting with dogs (or just out and about with dogs)

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    Member sameyer's Avatar
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    Default For those hunting with dogs (or just out and about with dogs)

    Most probably are already aware that trapping season has begun in most of the interior including unit 13. November 10th trapping season opens throughout South Central. But for those new or unaware, it is time to be more vigilant when hunting with our dogs. Also a good idea to have a heavy duty side cutter pliers and a 5 foot length of decent (7mm or 8mm rope) handy in case one does have a dog get in a snare or a connibear.

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    Member skybust's Avatar
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    maybe a stupid question but what is the rope for I know what the cutters are used

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    Member sameyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skybust View Post
    maybe a stupid question but what is the rope for I know what the cutters are used
    If I knew how I would post the illustrations on using it to compress the jaws on a connibear. I'll look around and see if I can find a website for that. Basically you can loop the rope through the jaws and lever it open.

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    Member sameyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sameyer View Post
    If I knew how I would post the illustrations on using it to compress the jaws on a connibear. I'll look around and see if I can find a website for that. Basically you can loop the rope through the jaws and lever it open.
    This website shows the procedure fairly well.

    http://www.gundoghousedoor.com/artic...d_Trapping.htm

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    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    Great post! I carry along metal shears for clipping bird wings. They also double for snare wire. I use them because they are more heavy duty than game shears, so I can cut wire if I need to. The rope should be about 4-5 ft in length with a loop tied to one end. The loop should be able to fit over your boot. You run the loose end through both spring holes on one of the springs of the conibear, around the second hole, and back through the first hole. You then pull the rope, and it compresses the one spring, which will give you enough leverage to get whatever is in the trap out. It's kind of hard to explain. Being an avid beaver trapper, I do this a lot. If you are in the Fairbanks area, and want to know how to get an animal free of some of these traps, let me know and I'll be glad to show you. Having the knowledge to get your dogs head out of a conibear is one of the most important things to know up here!

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    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    http://www.terrierman.com/traprelease.htm
    This shows what I was trying to explain. Again if your in the Fairbanks area, and want to see it done, I will have no problem showing anyone!

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    my beagle knows all about snares....however if i think that if she meets a 330 that i'll be going home with one less dog and one more conibear
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Member skybust's Avatar
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    Thanks guys I have labs but dont have to worry about traps during duck season, but I did just put a deposit on a beagle so that is something Ill have to worry about during next years rabbits season thanks again for the information. Chris

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Also keep in mind that many kids, and completely stupid adults, do not know the trapping rules, or ethics, and will go all Jeremiah Johnson and set traps in places that they shouldn't.
    Case in point is the Anchorage Coastal Refuge. The regs (page 25) clearly state that the majority of the 14C units outside the hills are closed to trapping. During each of the past three winters I have heard of at least one dog walker having their mut caught in a trap out there. Usually it is a leg hold set near the coastal trail. A trapper following the rules wouldn't be doing this, but a kid doing the Mountain Man thing with some traps he bought at a garage sale would.

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    I don't get out to many of the "commonly used trails" (as I prefer to get way out for hunting and hiking) but what are your thoughts on posting fliers at the trailheads with these trap release instructions as a "curtousy" from us trappers? Maybe even put some pieces of rope with them? Just a thought.

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    The small leg hold traps aren't much of a problem. Snares certainly can kill a dog. Other than for trapping beaver, where can a fellow in the interior expect to be hunting around connibear traps? I do everything I can to stay away from a trapper's line, but like Ak Ray says, there is always someone who does the unexpected. I've had my dogs caught in snares and small leg holds, nothing worse, and each time it was in a close-to-town-public-use area.

    Jim

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McCann View Post
    where can a fellow in the interior expect to be hunting around connibear traps?
    Beaver sets, marten sets on poles above the ground...could also be in a cubby set on the ground. I think it would depend on the trapper and their equipment. The two guys I went out with when I lived up there used leg hold traps for everything, but I think that was due to their college budget issues and not set styles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharksinthesalsa View Post
    my beagle knows all about snares....however if i think that if she meets a 330 that i'll be going home with one less dog and one more conibear
    Sharks, I thought you were a trapper. I'm suprised to see this quote from you!!

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Jim, Wolverines are often trapped with 330 conibears and can be set just about anywhere in the woods. If you see a 5 gallon bucket laying on its side, keep your dog close, it may have a coni in it and bait behind the coni...

    Also, if you get a wiff of skunk, keep your eyes open and your dog close, traps are nearby...

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    DK, im on both sides of this fence. i do trap mostly with snares and conibears, so i know exactly what they would do to my 13 inch beagle. I have actually trained her at home with snares not to pull. As for the 330 it would most likely kill her when it is set off so i figure it would be a fair trade 25 dollar trap for a 500 dollar dog. A 220 i bet id have a few minutes to get her out, i think a 110 or 120 would just make her mad. I do agree with Ray that proper use of traps and folowing regs can prevent alot of dog catching.
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharksinthesalsa View Post
    I do agree with Ray that proper use of traps and folowing regs can prevent alot of dog catching.
    Actually, I'm on both sides as well as a dog musher and trapper....and I agree 100% with the above quote. Probably 95% of the coni caught dogs, the traps were set in inappropriate places for killer traps. That being said, last spring I was trapping beaver and otter in a faraway creekbed that is a LONG ways from from trails and homes...and tracks in the snow showed clearly how close I came to catching someones dog. I dont even know if the owner realized how close it was....Yea, i'd gladly give up the trap in that situation (where it killed someones dog).....

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    I'm not a trapper (yet...) so I really appreciate you guys posting up this info, I recently got a domerman who can seemingly run for hours and not get enough excercise and I was just thinking about this topic the other day! Any how thanks again!

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    I still worry like all get out about my dogs getting into a snare or trap and me not being able to find him in time. Scares me to death. But I've discussed this issue on many forums with many trappers and dog men for many years, and I have never read such gentlemenly responses on either side of the issue as I have here. Thank you trappers for your prompt, courteous and concerned replies.

    Jim

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    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    Again, anyone want a quick lesson, just let me know! Great conversation!

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    Member Burke's Avatar
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    I recently recieved the following email from a friend...he found a tool for cutting snares from dogs. There may be more than one trapper supply company that sells them.......

    "They are rounded end, specifically made to cut snare cables. I got them from a trapping supply guy and I have found that they zip through cable like scissors through paper. They are very quick to use with considerable leverage due to the design. Dykes are Ok if you have the time to worry the cable apart but not much better than a leatherman tool. They are about the size of a pair of pliers with red rubber grips.
    From M&M Furs, Inc website American Made Cable Cutter
    Most valuable tool for any snareman to cut cable or support wire $28.95 - Each"

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