Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Boiling traps

  1. #1

    Default Boiling traps

    Okay, so I got some new traps, have a big burner, and got my pot. I don't really want to dye them, and I have heard/read that boiling with wood chips works well as a subsitute for dyes. What type of chips or wood should be used? I saw Fred Meyer has alder chips in bags that are pretty cheap. Is that good or should I just go chop up some spruce from my yard and use that? Also, what ratio of wood to water? Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    If these are new traps you will boil them a few minutes in clean water then pour the water off of them to remove the grease or oil residue that they were packed in. I set my traps out in the weather and let them get a fine coat of rust on them, then i boil them in a solution of logwood trap dye. I mix one pack of dye and about 4 gallons of water. This will dye 5 or 6 dozen MB 650 size traps. After they dry I dip them in a pot of hot trap wax for just a couple minutes..Just long enough to let the trap warm up a little. I do not touch the traps with my bare hands after i start the first rinse with clean water. I trap mainly for cats and coyotes, hope this gives you a place to start.

  3. #3
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    639

    Default

    i like to just go and snap some spruce limbs off and boil them up ...throw in a little willow or birch or whatever you have in your area you'll be trapping...its cheaper yet....
    as far as how much goes i'd put a bunch in you can never have too much...just make sure that the traps are fully submerged in the water.....i like to put the sticks in the bottom and them place the traps on top so they can be easily removed and hung....some people like to wax them too....i have never done it....don't wax conibears or snares
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks, cast iron. I knew about letting them rust first, just wasn't sure what woods were good. I figured local woods worked.

    Sharks - thanks. I won't be waxing them, but I needed to know how much wood. i have plenty of spruce and birch around here.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    6,493

    Default

    You are just getting the tannin out of the wood to stain the traps some.Anything that makes brackish water will work
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6
    Member Huntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Somewhere between here and there.....
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    Just a little hint..once they are done a wire coat hanger works wonderful for pulling traps/snares out and hanging them up. We generally hang them in a tree after we are done, away from any sort of "smells" like exhaust that might get on them...
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks. That is what I had planned to do with them - just hang them out in the woods until I am ready for them. Have to dig around for the wire hangars we have.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Bristol Bay
    Posts
    249

    Default

    a short piece of #9 wire bent into a hook shape works well and tends to hold up a bit better than the thin wire on a hanger. I have also used #11 wire but it tends not to work as well
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

  9. #9

    Default

    you better off to use logwood trap dye purchased thru trapping supply houses, the method of useing spruce limbs/birch or whatever will work but you'll find the logwood powder is way more effecient & does a better job of coloring/dyeing the traps i would also suggest takeing the extra time & wax your traps as it helps prevent premature rusting of the trap in the field, i've caught many coyotes in traps that were not waxed & dirty but i've read sign in tracks that i've had refusals at sets w/dirty/unwaxed traps only to have a coyote 20' away in a set made with a clean properly dyed,waxed trap. with trapping as with most things you put in the effort to do something right the 1st time & you'll reap the bennefits but if you only put in a halfa--ed effort, well dont be surprised if your catch is only mediocre. 90% of the fur is caught by 10% of the trappers so if you want to be in that 10% group then put in the time,effort & elbow grease to do it right the 1st time, coyotes have a nose that is 2nd to none & a wolf is his equal so properly treat your traps,practice makeing sets, & get out in the bush pay attention & hone your skills cause experience takes time to aquire.

  10. #10

    Default

    I will lok into the logwood dye. Thanks for the advice.

    If I wax them, should I put the wax in the water with the dye as some have suggested or do it separately somehow?

  11. #11

    Default

    to wax traps get a 2nd pot large enough to completely submerge the trap & use pure clean trap wax no water, i use the white variety sold through trapping supply co's my boiling pot & waxing pot are both turkey frying pots & propane burners, after you dye the traps & remove them from the dye pot the steel will be very hot & the water will evaporate almost imediately then submerge the trap in the hot wax for aprox 1-2minutes, when you pull the trap out of the wax let the excess drip off into the pot, it only takes a couple seconds & the trap will have a wet look to it, the wax will look like clear water but do not set the burner so high that the wax starts to boil if it does turn down the temp slightly so that the wax is clear & level, wax is flamable so keep a lid close at hand so if you should get a fire you can smother it out with no problem, the traps should then be hung out to dry & after you complete this process NEVER NEVER touch the traps with bare hands, use only clean cotton gloves, i usually purchase about 4 doz a year & wash them when they become soiled, store the traps in sealed rubbermaid tubs until your ready to set them.

  12. #12

    Default

    I've never used wax and most trappers I know don't use wax. Just another step that isn't really needed. Logwood dye and branches from different trees. Not as much spruce as it will tend to dominate the smell. Traps will turn a dark blue/black color. Keep them in a clean area and only use clean gloves when setting.

  13. #13

    Default

    How do you guys transport these to your line?
    Do you put them in a plastic bag or just toss em' in your pack and set with gloves on?

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks for he info. I went ahead and boiled the traps I have and then took them straight out of the water and hung them in the woods out back. Figure I can let them rust that way. Gonna get some logwood dye and do that and then I will be set for those. All I have right now are conibears and snares, so I don;t need to wax them. Once I get some long springs and 4-coil Bridgers I will wax them and see how it goes. Doesn't look too hard or expensive, so why not.

    One question: when I boiled them, I threaded a cable through the rings on all of them and lowered them into the water. I let them boil for about 10 minutes and then pulled them out and hung them. Should I have poured the water off first or does it matter? I just noticed the oil has formed a sheen on top and when I pulled them out, I thought maybe some of the oil got back on them.

  15. #15

    Default

    yeah you should have dumped the water off but since your just useing conibears it really doesnt matter as most critters targeted with conibears, mink,marten,wolverine,beaver,lynx,muskrats are not scent shy at all & what little bit of oil that did get back on the trap is insignificant, ive used the ANDY STOE'S SPEED DIP & other types of speed dip the kind you mix with regular gassoline & had great results, i dip my conibears with this method as its convenient & fast, the traps do have a gas odor but hang them out for a few days & its all but gone, BUT DO NOT store these traps with or next to any coyote/wolf traps that you've treated with the dye/wax procedure as they may take on a bit of the gas smell.

  16. #16

    Default

    i forgot to mention , with the snares you dont have to dye them just boil for bout 10-15 minutes in bakeing soda, it removes any foreign odors & oils from the cable & gives the cable a sort of dull sheen to it & removes the shiney gloss of new cable, then hang outside for couple days but wear clean cotton gloves when handleing them & bag them up in ziplocks 6-12 per bag you can place a handfull of spruce needles in the bag with the snares if you want to add a sort of cover scent to the snares.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    46

    Default

    When you boil your snares all the oil and crud is on top, do not pull your snares up through that or pour the water off or you will coat the snares in that surface slime. If you pot is full you can skim it off or use a large funnel to add enough water to flush it over the side of the pot. If you just dump water in it will carry the crud down into you snares. Clean Clean Clean is the trick with wolf and coyote snares.

  18. #18

    Default

    I took 2 20 inch truck rims and welded them together, welded the valve holes up then welded them down on a piece of 10 ga. metal. I welded a pipe elbow in the bottom of the 10 ga. after drilling a hole in it. I put a pipe nipple in the elbow with a cap over the end. I can remove the cap to drain the pot and leave the cap off when i am not using the pot so rain will not gather in the pot. about 2 inches from the top of the pot i drilled a hole and welded a short piece of pipe over the hole on the outside. When i get my traps clean i can stick a water hose down inside the pot and turn it on so it runs a stream about the size of a pencil. When it fills up to the pipe all the oil and scent will float out the hole and into a bucket that i pour out away from my pot to keep it from getting muddy where i am working. This set up works well and i do the same when i get them clean i repeat the process with the logwood dye.

    The trap wax also speeds up the trap allowing you to get a better hold on the animal you are trapping. It does help protect the trap but the extra speed causing you to get a better hold of the animal you are after is reason enough to use the wax. After i start cleaning my traps i never touch them unless i have a rubber glove on. Scent can go through cotton or canvass gloves. Hope this helps and happy trapping.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •