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Thread: 62 caliber shooters?

  1. #1

    Default 62 caliber shooters?

    Anyone else out there shooting 62 caliber rifles or smoothbores?

    I've been shooting s 62 smoothie (GM drop-in barrel for TC's) with RB and shot loads with good results. My RB load is 90 grains of 3f Goex and my load with 1 oz of #6 has been 80 grains of 2f Goex.

    I've got a 62 caliber rifle on the way, a 38" barreled Tennessee, and I'm curious about other people's loads for their 62's. Hunting stories would be good too!!!

  2. #2
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    What kind of accuracy do you get with the RB load?

    What are the particulars for your Shot Load, and is there any way to make a Speed Loader for the Shot Load?

    If you don't mind.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  3. #3

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    I can usually hover around 3" at 50 yards with RB. The GM barrel is a little "tight" for a 62, forcing me to use a .600 ball and .010 muslin patch. Lots of folks buy Jeff Tanner .595 molds so they can use a thicker patch, but I haven't gone that far yet.

    My shot load is pretty straight forward. I use a "A" wad between shot and powder and a regular over-shot card on top of the shot. Fine tuning detail is to dip the A wads in olive oil and let them sit overnight to soak it up, since they come unlubed, and to put a couple of knicks in the edge of the overshot card so it "burps" air as you seat it.

    Patterns with that combo run in the Skeet II/Improved realm at 30 yards. I've considered having the barrel jug choked for a little tighter pattern, but that's another thing on the round-to-it list. It's plenty good now for my typical ranges on snowshoe hare.

    I haven't stuck any deer or larger with the 62 ball, but that's high on my list this year. It's not "needed" for effectiveness, but that 325 grain .600 round ball is a lot more reassuring here in brown bear country than a 225 grain .530 ball.

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    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Thanks for the loads and tips BrownBear. I'm like the "A" wad, soaking it up!


    Ed
    Afflicted by condition human

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    BB:

    What is an "A" Wad?

    Where can you get'em?

    Do they come in 50 Caliber?

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6

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    Hey Smitty,

    They're cardboard wads .125" thick- enough to seal the bore and protect the base of the shot column while not so thick that they have the mass to be pushed up through the shot pattern as it exits the bore. Go back up to my post that mentions them, and the reference is a link to the first page of listings for wads at Track of the Wolf. Once you click that, go to page 5 for .510 wads for 50 cal. The top of each page is a table showing which diameter goes with each gauge or caliber. There are also over-shot cards listed on the same pages. The thick fiber wads you see there too are claimed by some to be too heavy and prone to producing donut-shaped patterns, though I haven't experienced that myself, at least down through 20 gauge.

    Just don't forget to lube those A cards!

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    Thanks BB:
    I didn't notice that was a Link there.

    You're a beeg help. AS USUAL.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8

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    Thanks Smitty.

    All I can say is, if you get the chance to get near a bigger bore, do it. After so many years with cartridge guns, I started out with muzzleloaders thinking 50 was big. As I was trained with brass, I kept trying to get more "power" with more powder, then conicals rather than RBs. It wasn't till I picked up a 54 that the light went on. Bigger balls not only weigh more and hit harder, they disrupt a heck of a lot more flesh even without any expansion.

    Now I think of my 50's as "small" bores! Still fun to use and still kill well, but it starts getting really interesting when the bores get big enough you can stick a finger down the muzzle! Don't need them, that's for sure. But "need" is a word reserved for wives when justifying new guns. I own so many guns because I ENJOY them, and bigger bore muzzleloaders just add to the fun.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I've got a 62 caliber rifle on the way, a 38" barreled Tennessee....
    It arrived today, and I'M IN LOVE!!!

    Holy cow. Gently used, but in great shape. It weighs about the same as my Lyman GPR 54 caliber (8 pounds or so), in spite of the longer 1" barrel. And it balances and points better. Plenty of time to get it into action before the end of the primitive weapon deer season, so after tomorrow morning's hunt, I'll take it out for its first range session.

    I got high hopes for this one becoming my "all around" rifle. A 325 grain ball at around 1600 fps should get the attention of anything it lands on, I bet.

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    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Congrats and sounds good.

    I reckon there aren't any animals that wouldn't pay attention to 325grns, at any speed above wrist-rocket! Pictures would be nice to see.
    Afflicted by condition human

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by e45colt View Post
    Pictures would be nice to see.
    I'll drag along the camera when I get to shoot it. We've got a storm blowing in, so I'll be hunting in the morning rather than shooting. Soon though. You can bet I'm chomping at the bit to get it into action!

  12. #12

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    I forgot the camera, but at least I got out and shot the Tennessee this afternoon. Here are the nuts and bolts:

    I fired it 30 times from the bench, 10 shots each with 80 grains 3f, 90 grains 2f and 100 grains 2f. Ignition was virtually instantaneous with no misfires. Looks like the flint could easily go for another 30 or more- It's going to be real easy on flints.

    I was using 3f for prime, and forgot to try 2f. It's likely that my charge will be 90 grains of 2f for deer, but the accuracy appears to be there if I want to snort it up for moose or elk.

    I'm not sure how much it had been shot before I got it, because it definitely wasn't sighted in. All shots were about 5" low at 25 yards. Since it appeared to be putting all loads in roughly the same spot, I went to filing and raised the POI about 4". I'll save the last bit till I settle on a load.

    Groups were disappointing till I picked up patches after the first few rounds. A .600 ball and .018 ticking was easy to load, but burning through the patches. I had some .022 canvas in the range box, so I switched to that. Seating effort went up noticeably, but groups shrank immediately, and I could probably reuse the patches.

    The rifle weighs about the same as a GPR- call it somewhere just over 8 pounds, I'd guess. But somehow it has better balance than a GPR for my taste.

    I was curious about recoil, being a light 62 and a Tennessee to boot, but no sweat. It definitely recoils more than my Big Boar 58's with the same charges, but when held right recoil is not uncomfortable, even from the bench. You definitely know you lit something off, but I don't think recoil will be an issue at all. It' going to be an "attention getter" if I push much past 100 grains, though.

    One more shooting session and final sight-in and this one is going hunting!

  13. #13
    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Great range report and sounds like a fine future in the woods for that rifle. Good luck hunting!
    Afflicted by condition human

  14. #14

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    I carried the 62 on a hunt yesterday evening, and wow. What a pleasure in the woods. It's so well balanced it feels "light."

    I learned a few things worth commenting on.

    First the sights. They're dandy on the range, but too "fine" for use in the woods and mixed lighting even with a silver front blade. For the time being I'm going to open and deepen the rear notch a little. Long term I'm going to trade out the front for a thicker, all steel, then open the rear to match. Based on experience with other muzzleloaders as well as handguns, coarser sights are just easier to see.

    And the pan "leaks." That and some other details convince me it's an L&R lock. No prob, and an easy fix with a little stoning to tighten the frizzen fit against the pan, but imagine my surprise when I checked the prime after walking half an hour and found the pan empty!!! Woops. Thereafter I concentrated on carrying the rifle more or less flat and upright, but I also checked the prime frequently. That's not acceptable to me, even knowing the short term RX, because I want to be concentrating on what's going on around me and not how I carry a rifle.

    This thing is just chomping at the bit to draw first blood. It's ready, but now I have to find hair to put under the sights.

  15. #15

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    BrownBear,

    I responded to a post of yours a while back about sending my GM barrel to Ed Rayl to be rifled. My apologies for not updating you on that project. I got the barrel back and wow, does it ever shoot. At 50 yards with 100-120 grains behind a .600 rb it shoots one big ragged hole. I had thought I would convert it to flint but think now I will have a left hand .62 flint built. I really like the large caliber muzzleloaders. I keep applying for the Ft. Rich hunt but no luck so far. I haven't had an opportunity to take any game with it yet but expect the big .62 rb to do a fine job.

    mart

  16. #16

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    Thanks for the report back Mart! I've been holding off sending my own GM barrel to Ed, planning to use it with shot this winter since I've got the Tennessee. If a lighter shotgun or fowler jumped up in front of me, that might change.

    Out of curiosity, what patch are you using with that barrel now? In the GM I found the .600 ball way tight with .018, but way too loose in the Tennessee. I'm assuming that rifling "loosened" things in the GM a bit.

  17. #17

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    BrownBear,

    I am running the .010 Ox Yoke lubed patch. I have tried it with and without the lubed wads and don't see enough difference in accuracy to worry about. The lubed wad does allow me quite a few more shots before cleaning. Not an issue in the field but they help at the range when I am doing a fair amount of shooting. I have tried thicker patches but the .010 load easily with just a bump of the short starter and seem to be tight enough to hold everything in place for a day of traipsing around the woods. I cannot argue with the accuracy either. After three shots there is one large ragged hole in the target and subsequent shots just disappear through that hole if I do my part. It does seem to like 2F black just slightly better than Pyrodex but not enough to notice in the field. I use musket caps on it simply because they are easier to put on and remove. The rifle seems to care little which cap does the igniting. I will say though that the 120 grain hunting load leaves no doubt in your mind that it went off. I often drop down to 80-90 grains when I am playing around with no loss in accuracy. I am going to play with some 40-50 grain loads this winter just for fun.

    Ed Rayl's work is outstanding. He is very reasonable in his pricing, my barrel was around $90 to rifle IIRC, with return shipping. All in all it has been a really good project for me. I bought the barrel on close out for $100, the stock was a take off that I found online for $150 and the rifling was $90. For $340 I ended up with a fine shooting big bore muzzleloader.

    I really look foward to getting the oppotunity to take a moose with it. Now I just need to save up for a .62 flintlock.

    Mart

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by mart View Post
    For $340 I ended up with a fine shooting big bore muzzleloader.
    I'll say you did! I've got about twice that in my leftie 62 Tennessee flinter, and felt like I got a good deal.

    Thanks for the feedback on loads and loading. I can bet that gem has authority on both ends with 120 grains! Right now I'm loading 90 grains of 2f Goex for deer, and you definitely want to be holding it right. Unless or until I go for moose, it may never see 120.

  19. #19

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    BrownBear,

    Wow, another lefty flintlock fan. I have a little .32 caliber left handed flint. It is a lot of fun and a five pound bag of 0 buck and a pound of 3f lasts a long time.

    Who built your lefty Tennessee? I have been thinking about a TVM Early Virginia LH in 62. I have heard nothing but good about their rifles.

    Mart

  20. #20

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    The builder is a mystery, because the guy I got it from took it in on a trade and the original owner wasn't specific. But looking closely at the stock, hardware and barrel, I'm betting it's TVM. They get their barrels from Long Hammock and the lock is right. I've handled several TVM's and they're consistent. BTW- One of my pards is slowly building a TVM with interchangeable smooth and rifled barrels.... In 72 caliber! He's about finished, but didn't manage it in time for this year's season.

    Your 32 sounds ideal. I've got a couple of small Cochrain left handed locks (flint), and am toying with making a "matched" set of 2 rifles with them- one in 32 and the other in 45. The idea is to make them really trim and from stock blanks cut side by side from the same stump. It will be a while, but after shooting the Tennessee, I've moved the project up. While I could eventually build them myself, I'm inclined to have Ron Paull build them. He used to be with GRRW and in fact built my 58 cal Hawken, and after a long hiatus is going back into building.

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