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Thread: Silvretta 404 AT bindings?

  1. #1
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    Default Silvretta 404 AT bindings?

    Hey guys!

    My first post here at the forum.

    I am trying to get a pair of ski bindings that are compatible with mountaineering boots... And I've come to the conclusion that a pair of Silvretta 404s would be a cheap and good solution. Does anybody know where I can get a pair...? I know they don't make them anymore, so buying used is my only bet I think.

    Thanks,

    Keane

  2. #2
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    They are hard to find. You might try looking on Cascade climbers. And watch Ebay. There's 500 available, and I have a pair that I like quite a bit. They work well with my mountaineering boots and my AT boots.

    Welcome to the forum.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

  3. #3
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    Climb High used to be bringing these bindings in.

    Truth be told... the Silvretta 404 bindings are much more an 'approach' system vs. being all that ideal for Alpine descents (particularly with any speed, heavier weight, steeper gradient, more demanding snow conditions, smaller foot sizes, and more rigid boot selections) This system does not deal well with torque and DIN settings are somewhat not what they spec on paper to be in a practical application.

    Using mountaineering double boots, they work fine for approach (although more complex than need-be & cumbersome), yet for actual Alpine descents - I'd not recommend the set up at all.

    Going with Alpine or Randonee boots for more rigid support would be better for the downhill skiing part, however they are just not very reliable or fun bindings to deal with.

    In addition --- Many of today's ski geometries do not lend themselves to the old school... The Silvretta 404s had a safety-strap retention, had an add-on break-kit, and compatible metal crampons could be included in the package. This stuff may not be compatible with your newer model skis.

  4. #4
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Brian has got a point. I work a little different terrain than most people who look for a back-country setup. What I wanted was a short ski with fish scales so I could work easy hills. I also wanted the ability to put skins on for getting up to the wind blown ridges to work ptarmigan. Once I was up out of the snow or crust. I would take my skis off and have a decent pair of hiking boots on. AT boot flex but they don't flex enough for me. On the way down I do what I call "survival skiing". I pick a line that I can gradually ascend in a safe manner without really having to turn. Plus when I get down in the valleys I have big fat short skis on with metal edges so they magically turn into snow shoes. But I don't rip down insane faces with this set up. They are primarily for going up hill and having enough support to actually ski a bit. With mountaineering boots on you cant learn forward and drive the trips so making turns is pretty hard. That's why AT setups are the best for what Brian is describing.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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