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Thread: 4 season hunting tent?

  1. #1
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    Question 4 season hunting tent?

    I am looking to buy a new backpack tent, one man and some room to dress in.As you know it has to be super strong and very light.What are your favorites?

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    I have used numerous 3 and 4 season tents and one of my favorites for solo sheep hunts ect is the hillberg akto. Its 4 season and weighs about 3lbs 5oz. Not the biggest tent out ther but enough room for you and your gear. Also if you try to use the search function there are a lot of old threads on this subject. Good luck!

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    My buddy and I used to use his 4 seasons north face. Not sure the model name, but it has been an awesome tent. Sheep hunting, moose hunting, and southeast hunting has kept us dry and warm.

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    Bibler I tent, no fly, sets up in no time. Extremely tight for 2 just right for 1. Used it for sheep and goat this year, was nice during the freezing weather. It is the yellow one is the photo.

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    I saw plenty of the Biblers when climbing Denali - excellent tent for severe conditions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by northway View Post
    My buddy and I used to use his 4 seasons north face. Not sure the model name, but it has been an awesome tent. Sheep hunting, moose hunting, and southeast hunting has kept us dry and warm.
    Northway, was it the VE25? I have looked at this one for a while but haven't bought it yet. Looks pretty stable.

    http://www.backcountry.com/the-north...S|b|3945173894

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    What sorts of conditions do you see yourself out in... like heavy rains, high winds with exposure in Alpine or open tundra (treeless), less exposure w/ trees or brush, Dirt/mud, standing/running water atop spongy ground, bitter cold/dry or freezing temps on snow with snow-loading...?

    Plan to hot box or cook inside?

    1 man having some extra room... changing clothes, bringing pack or extra gear in?

    What kind of weight (both min. and max.) would be target for carry.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Tent

    This looks like a nice one: http://www.bobwards.com/products2.cf...season-camping

    I have a VE45 Northface, don't make them anymore, it has been great for 2 guys.

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    I would like to look at them all be for buying one . Just don't know where to.It will have to take all the snow with out breaking a pole or tearing .I have returned to camp to find my tent so flat and covered in snow with a broken pole but usable for the trip ,thank god. I have had other tent shreaded by the wind.It would be nice to keep my pack and wet boots out of the tent but the stove either way.

  10. #10

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    I'd consider this if you ever saw yourself doing some cold-weather camping in addition to solo backpacking. There is nothing better than warming up by a stove at night in cold weather. I have both a 4-man and 12-man tipi, and love them. The Sawtooth is their latest & greatest, and has some nice features over my 4-man.

    http://www.kifaru.net/sawtooth.html

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    I have a Hillberg Akto and have used it in some tough weather conditions. It is a one man with a vestibule and floor. I am very happy with it enduring heavy wind and wet snow.

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    I really like the look of the Biblers I-Tent, drawbacks are that its a bit short if you're a 6 footer. A slightly bigger version is the Eldorado if you're tall.

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    The North Face VE-25 is a great 4-season tent that has been used on Denali for years. It is great for two guys and gear but weighs over 9 lbs. The Hillberg tents sold at Barneys are the lightest 4-season tents that are not single wall that I know. There is nothing worse than coming back to camp and finding your 3 season tent blown down. The next year I bought a Wildcountry tent (similiar to the VE-25) in design and it has been great. Barneys used to sell the Wildcountry tents but I don't think they can be imported anymore.

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    i've used a few...seen some work, seen plenty blow up too...i'm two seasons into an msr fury...i like it so far, have put it in fifty knots or so, but havent been in a "real" blow with it yet. holds up to snow fine on spring bear hunts...

    that said, i'm a big guy and if you like some room in a backpacking tent, a stevensons warmalite would be my pic. the one rated for hundred mph wind is only six pounds or so, and its definitely a two man tent(very roomy compared to the fury or the above mentioned northface), with a vestibule on both ends. kind of hard to come by...my boss gets em directly from the company... kinda a mom and pop sewery in new hampshire or somewhere out east i think...really good single walled tent. i have personally been in this tent in eighty plus knot wind...i've also had one blow up in 110 knot gusts...but i cant really blame it for that...havent seen anything stand up to those kinda winds except for a northface himalaya 47 (not a back packing tent) but i dont think they make those anymore (its a bigger tent anyway) lots of good suggestions on here though...

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    Thanks to all,I'll study them and let you guys know the one I pick.

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    Had a Kifaru 6 man GO TO PIECES on our hunt this fall. Wind was pretty strong (I didn't think horrible) but in the 40+ mph range. Never seen $2k flap in the breeze before that....
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

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    Thumbs up

    I'll second that with regards to Kifaru Tents and stove jacks not recommended in really high winds... that is not really their niche/emphasis.


    There are better 'high wind', versatile, lightweight, single-pole designs made for 4-season mountaineering... keep in mind frosting/condensation, no floor, not self standing, bugs, and so on. Stronger tents like the Black Diamond Mega and Beta Mid or MSR Twin Sisters will hold up plus be exceptional on keeping the rain/snow out. However, if you have run-off, standing water, mud, sand, snow and ice... there is no floor, unless you have the detachable bathtub addition - I think defeating the purpose to some degree.

    Here in Alaska (were we will likely encounter saturating conditions during overlapping seasons) single-wall, semipermeable fabrics are not a great choice. High & dry - fine. Super wet - no way!

    Finest of the freestanding 4-season tents for 1+ people size here in Alaska in all conditions are going to be tents with designs/shapes like Mountain Hardwear Trango series, Eureka High Camp, Kelty Orb, TNF Mountain 25. Most of this is 5 pole... so a bit on heavy side and maybe overkill roominess for 1.

    Another freestanding option (likely candidate for OP) is MSR Fury and Kelty Radiant... strong, steep-sided, built (I think) tight for 2, yet a solid 1+ person 4-season.

    In general - I'm not a big fan of tunnel-tents. Tho' some are very good, while lightweight, efficient and simple... I do not like the greater spans of fabric having no structure other than tension for wind and snow loading in ever changing conditions.

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    I made up my mind finally and went with the stephensons warmalite 2R tent .I just sit it up and was happy with the ease and the 42sq.ft. of space. This 2 man tent weighs 2.75 lbs.but the price of $505 was hard but it will probably out last me .My grandson will be a lucky guy to inherit a lot of good hunting equipment.

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    I would recommend anything by Hilleberg. I own a Nallo 3 GT and consider it to be the best tent I have ever owned. This would be too big for one person, but they have many smaller tents as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter353 View Post
    I made up my mind finally and went with the stephensons warmalite 2R tent .I just sit it up and was happy with the ease and the 42sq.ft. of space. This 2 man tent weighs 2.75 lbs.but the price of $505 was hard but it will probably out last me .My grandson will be a lucky guy to inherit a lot of good hunting equipment.
    Looks like ya went for the tunnel tent option. True enough they are simple and lightweight. Definitely not a free-standing set-up - get really durable and reliable over-sized stakes.

    Recall what I mentioned above:
    In general - I'm not a big fan of tunnel-tents. Tho' some are very good, while lightweight, efficient and simple... I do not like the greater spans of fabric having no structure other than tension for wind and snow loading in ever changing conditions.

    Couple other things to really take into account. This tent is primarily a dryer conditions mountain climber's variety (think altitude and dry snows). Silicone Nylon is not all that great for days and days of coastal downpour or with wind driven rains That's not its niche and not the purpose for which the fabric was designed. The specs on Warmlight tents also make no mention of the tub fabric and coating. If the tub does not include a good polyurethane coating... should consider a waterproof footprint.

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