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Thread: Snowshoe Hare for survival

  1. #1

    Default Snowshoe Hare for survival

    hey folks, been teaching arctic survival for UAF this fall symester, and we snared a snowshoe hare this weekend as a practical survival exercise.

    Aside from skewering and cooking over an open flame, does anyone have any super easy field recipes to share that might make it a more palatable experience for students who have not eaten rabbit before?

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts on recipes or prefered cooking methods.

    larry

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    larry whats in our pack to prepare stuff... or are we indiana jones stranded?

    i almost always have a small pot or metal cup and can make water for soups and stews...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member joefish00000's Avatar
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    butter, onion, and meat. simple and dilitioso!
    tip,
    cut the meat into small pieces to avoid it being chewy.

  4. #4

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    copy that, Vince. either skewered over flame or pot to boil...i always take a small pot for coffee and tea water and food prep.

    pot heated by coal.jpg

  5. #5

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    thanks joefish. i might try some lipton soup mix and cut the meat small. boiled, i presume?

  6. #6

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    Hi Larry, I would highly recommend letting hare soak overnight in a saltwater solution or vinegar. It does two things. #1, it takes a lot of the gaminess out of meat, #2, if some of the meat is damaged, it makes it easy to separate the good meat from the bad. If you were in a survival situation, you might not have salt or vinegar, but I doubt you would mind the taste if you were hungry anyhow.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Carry heavy duty aluminum foil/salt and pepper ( I carry a mixture of spices in a ziploc)/ stick of butter or margerine;
    Wrap small pieces of meat up in a packet of foil after seasoning and applying a pat of butter, then put packets over coals and rake some other coals over that. You can put small chunks of potato and slices of onion in also. Depending on your coals and fire arrangement (reflecting rocks, etc.) it should bake about 45 min. to an hour.
    Works equally well for birds and you can do a mixed bag. Lots of variations.

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    I always boil it, then when its about done, add stuff like, rice (I always keep 2 cups of rice in my survival kit) willow bark( its like a minor pain killer,and it really good for you to!) a half handful of pine needles, wood ash(as salt) lilly pad roots (they are like potatoes once they are peeled, be careful though, to many can make you sick if you havn't eaten in a while) if I can find anything else like that I will put it in there but on the trap line or hunting, that Is typically all I have on hand.

  9. #9

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    Fantastic replies, fellas. Thank you so much for your input. I'll try take some pictures tonight and share with you how the har tasted.

  10. #10

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    I'll second Sayak's suggestions. When out camping, my family regularly cooked meals the way he described. We called them "Hobo dinners".

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Sayak already posted my easy recipe. I use that one with duck, hare, bear, deer, turkey..... Just make an aluminum foil packet and add vegetables and seasonings to taste. Throw it in the fire and cover it up with coals.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


  12. #12

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    toss it in a pot or can along with other goodies you collect, cover with water and simmer/boil long enough to tenderize. Flavors your hot liquids and makes it a whole lot easier to keep up with fluid intake.

  13. #13

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    Ended up field dressing the hare and cutting the meat in to small nibblets, then boiled it in a pot with beef / chicken broth and veggie soup mixture for about 90 minutes. Tasted great, students ate seconds.

    Thanks much for the tips.

    larry

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    You ate "The Easter Bunny"............

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Hi Larry, I would highly recommend letting hare soak overnight in a saltwater solution or vinegar. It does two things. #1, it takes a lot of the gaminess out of meat, #2, if some of the meat is damaged, it makes it easy to separate the good meat from the bad. If you were in a survival situation, you might not have salt or vinegar, but I doubt you would mind the taste if you were hungry anyhow.

    I just gut them and skin right away, takes 2 minutes litterally. With staying pretty clean. No need to soak. Keeping bunnies whole for hours I believe makes them gamey, especially if gut shot a little. Just like big game, get the heat out!

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Like the foil Sayak mentioned but replace the butter with a small 2 oz. Nalgene bottle of olive oil. Use a ziploc snack bag with some seasonings with the small bottle of oil, good piece of new tin foil and the seasonings you can leave this in you survival kit along with 6 snares all year. Leave a little room in the bottle for expansion.
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  17. #17
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKFishOn View Post
    Like the foil Sayak mentioned but replace the butter with a small 2 oz. Nalgene bottle of olive oil. Use a ziploc snack bag with some seasonings with the small bottle of oil, good piece of new tin foil and the seasonings you can leave this in you survival kit along with 6 snares all year. Leave a little room in the bottle for expansion.
    Yeah, that would be good and tasty! Love olive oil for cooking.

    I forgot to mention that you can drop a slice of bacon in your packet if you have some. It keeps the meat moist and lends a taste of its own.

    Of course, if you're just trying to survive, though you may have foil and spices, it's unlikely that you will have butter, oil or bacon. But, hey, a recipe is a recipe, no?

  18. #18
    Member JR2's Avatar
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    My theory on survival packs was that when I was rescued I wanted to be able to offer the National Guard a hot cup of coffee before we left. I always had spices in a zip lock. Heck I even had soy sauce packets and powdered ginger...Teriyaki rabbit is good, its also good on Ptarm's, grouse, fish, squril and just about any other game you can eat.

    Adding an extra pound to your survival pack may make it weigh more, but if it makes you more comfortable for one night its worth it as far as I am concerned.

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    One method I have used on rabbits is to find a flat rock and heat it with a fire. Make sure it doesn’t come out of the water since it could explode. Take what little fat you have on a rabbit and place it on the rock. Take the meat off the bone and cut it into thin slices and fry in the fat. Metal from a shovel can also be used for this and could simulate a piece of metal from an aircraft or other vehicle that they may be able to utilize in a survival situation.

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