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Thread: Paxon bou people need to spend more time with their rifles

  1. #1
    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Default Paxon bou people need to spend more time with their rifles

    Got off work at 6 am Saturday wife drove toward unit 13 while I slept. I got up when we neared Eureka we did not bring an atv or boat as I have not needed them in the past while hunting oct in unit 13. Now I have not hunted oct in unit 13 since the early 2000's. No snow to see if lots of bou have been crossing ie in the area. Saw one rig with a mature bull at eureka. We continued on to lake louise road lots of Rigs driving lake was open but very cold which was why I did not bring the boat I did not know if the steering would work properly at 10-20 degrees. Glassed a few spot for a couple hours saw some cows and calves wanted a mature bull.

    Continued on toward paxon saw nothing crossing but no snow to be sure if there were bou crossing. The closer we got to paxson the more successful hunters we saw coming home. Tried to stop at my old pullouts on the Denali hwy they were full of rigs and dead caribou. Found a spot to stop to glass saw cows and calves but to far to harvest and get out before dark. We continued on to about mile 25 spotted a small herd about 600 yds off the road but 3 people stalking and all cows and calves.

    We drove back to about mile 16 found and empty pull out for the night. Glassed a herd of about 50 animals a mile or so off the road so we went to bed.

    At about 7:30 we spotted a band of about 15 so we walked to the first ridge 400 yards off the road. There was one bull that was not what I was looking for. Just then another group of hunters was coming up the draw from a different direction so we sat on my perch and watched. They scared the band and gave chase. When they got about 500 yds past us another band of 7 appeared this band had 2 shooters in it. We moved another 400 yds closer the other group of hunters were coming back down the draw. About the time I was in shooting position the other guys spotted band and fired a couple shots. The bou started running so I trotted down the hill to cut them off. The largest bull gave me a perfect broadside at 300 yds. I walked toward my down bou as I went thru the last bit of brush I spooked a wounded bull I knew it was not mine but it was a nice bull. He was staying 50 ft in front of me. I looked for a wound with the binos and could not see one but he was not moving very fast. I hollered for the other hunters when one arrived I directed him to the easiest bull he would ever harvest. 4 shots later the bull was down. I watched many shots on Sunday and all I can say is people need to spend more time at the range. Having a problem downloading photo from I phone
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    JKB, there are a few options w/ the iphone if you have the data package. I upload my pics straight to photobucket using their Ap. You can also email a pic to yourself. Worst case you can futz around with iTunes and probably get it off that way, I can't stand iTunz and rarely use it so I am not sure what the steps are for that.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    IMG_0110.jpgGot it thanks Lujon. This is a picture of the best packer I know.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    That is a dandy caribou no doubt. Congrats to you and your packer on a freezer full of meat. Also good job on helping the other hunter get on the wounded bull. Job well done.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    One other note on this hunt got checked by troopers on our last trip to the road. Very profesional, nice job guys. Bring out all your meat and punch your tag at the kill site you have no problems.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Nice job jkb!

    Nice to hear of someone doing it right. I stayed away because of teh mad house atmosphere and I didn't need the meat.

    I and partners have taken to wearing orange hats in situations like this as well as during moose season here in Delta.

  7. #7
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Congrats on a great bull and a well conducted hunt.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    How's the meat? Looks fat and healthy. Good job.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    jkb I will have to agree with some of your assessment of the shooting out there... lots of shots taken. on the other hand...

    Notice of winners came out last week, and people only had a weeks notice to get up and go. for many just taking the time off was a factor. look how many have stated they only had ONE day. and those like ourselves that have done several of these winter harvest. know what to expect. early closures and people. this year they only gave out 3600 tags. and expect 50% to hunt them. next year. every one that applies will get that tag in the fall. (one tag per household; vs the two per now) i am guessing next year folks will have time to plan and play before hand some. i wonder how many dusted off the ol .270 and said "hello friend, it's been a long time"
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Congrats on the nice bull! I looked all over for one of those this weekend, seemed like the only ones I could find were 2 miles out just before dark :-)

    I agree on folks spending more time in the range... not sure how many times I heard 5 shots for people to down a single caribou. We ended up harvesting a cow from a band of 10 or so cows and young bulls because she had been wounded by someone recently (fresh blood high on her shoulder, both sides). She might have made it, previous bullet just grazed her spine, but it was an easy decision to take her over the others and let the healthy ones walk.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    One of my buddies was over there and saw some hunters shooting at a herd with a single bull while he was after his own. As he harvested his the cows and calfs of the other band ran by him with out the bull then watched the shooters climb back it the rig and leave. He never seen the downed bull but was sure the others just left it lay without recovering it.
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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    I agree, My wife took her caribou mid day Sat.. Sunday we focused on Ptarmigan beofre heading home.. We took the dog, kids and shotguns and pushed a thicket. out pops a wounded caribou.. it went a couple hundred yards and bedded down.. I got back to the road and flagged down the first truck I saw pass.. told the guy I know where a wounded bou was.. what luck.. the guy is the bear sealer at Anchorage F&G, so he and a gal snuck up to it and finished it off.. I was in a dilema, our tag was filled.. and their is a clearly wounded bou..we had shotguns wth 8 shot.. nothing we could do and I really didnt know what to do. So I figured we would find a hunter and see if they wanted to take it.. Turns out it was gut shot.. either the A-hole thought he missed it, or figured it was too small.. anyway, I unloaded the ATV and helped him bring it to the road and dress it out. Mile marker 32 was the location.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Vince I know you spend time shooting but for others that have trusty dusty .270 in the corner think if instead of going out to eat or going out to watch football just a couple times a year folks should go to the range take your wife take your kid take a buddy have fun becoming a better shooter.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    First off, much thanks to all of you that took the time to direct those guys to their wounded bull, and the others that went just as far out of their way to make sure the other wounded animals were harvested and even choosing to finish and put your own tag on one someone had already put a hole in. That is all some seriously classy stuff.

    jkb, that's a beautiful bull, nice job, congrats to you and your lady.

    I just took the bowhunter cert course this weekend, good class, and lots of good discussion about "accountability" in bowhunters (but obviously this goes for everyone) and your duty to recover the game you shoot.

    Not practicing, and then taking moving or long shots is simply irresponsible and speaks to the "ethics"( i.e. what you do when no one is looking). It's easy to get excited, but I know for me that 200 yards and standing still is as extreme as my rifle shooting is going to get, knowing when to click that safety back on and either wait or get closer is a big part of what we all need to do. Scary number of wounded bou stories for a 13 post thread coming from just a few days of hunting.

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    We started heading west out of Paxson at 8:15 Saturday morning and honestly the scenes were enough to make me never want to hunt this again. I did have an opportunity to talk to a few folks who were doing it right, but also whitnessed some of the most irresponsible behavior and absolute disregard for the animals. We did not bring the wheelers along and since harvesting a 'bou was not the #1 thing on our minds, were not overly disappointed when we left without one, but we should have had one on two different occasions. The first one we worked up a hill on a young bull and 4 cows getting within about 175 yards. Since my wife was shooting, we wanted to close the gap as shw does not spend as much time at the range as she should. She can hit a paper plate at 200 every time, but these are live animals and I hate wounding them. On this stalk, as we were closing the final gap, shots rang out at the same animals, the worst part, the shooters were behind us. Not over our heads, but within 30 yards or so. When the shooters realized we were there, they quickly loaded up and drove off. Next stalk was on a small band of 4 bulls, again we were within a couple hundred yards and another group starts plinking at them from 500 plus.

    The worst part of this, and also what ultimately lead to more problems, is that frustration, greed or jealousy can make people do stupid things. My wife knows how particular I am about making clean kills and she is on board, however after the second busted stalk, she asked if she could go ahead and just try a shot. By then the 'bou had moved off across a lake at around 400 yards. I advised her no.

    This really bugged her and it really bummed me out on two fronts. First she wasn't able to harvest an animal, and then actions of others had almost pushed her to make a reckless decision. I'm not judging anyones ability to kill an animal at 300 or 400 yards, I've done it myself with the right equipment, training and skills. The people I saw shooting these animals did not appear to have any other than perhaps a "big gun".

    Perhaps F&G needs to look at a no shooting corridor along the highway. At least this will force people to actulaly get off the road and move closer to the animals.

    Not sure if I want to return to this hunt or not. Just my $.02

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    Boy, looks llike I made the right choice to stick with LL. I was in contact with two different groups of friends that hunted Paxson and they said all the same things as stated above. Though there weren't many caribou at LL, I encounted nothing but friendly and courtious hunters. Actually put a few names to faces from the forum here. Spent the day hiking with the daughter, seen fox, moose and a few caribou. Beautifull weather and had a great lunch at the Wolverine Lodge!

  17. #17
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default This may sound crazy, but...

    ...maybe blaze orange vests/caps should be mandated for this hunt.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ERDucker View Post
    Not sure if I want to return to this hunt or not. Just my $.02
    Looks like a better hunt plan would be M-F?
    Good job on keeping the wife within her ability distance. Can understand the frustration.
    Your wife actually listens to you?
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    Looks like a better hunt plan would be M-F?
    Good job on keeping the wife within her ability distance. Can understand the frustration.
    Your wife actually listens to you?
    Very reluctantly and only about once or twice a year. I did tell her that if she really wants to kill something that bad, I'd be willing to do a fly out with her next year up on the slope....already planting the seed. Perhaps a few pictures from some of the great hunts posted this year will be enough to convince her to go.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoytguy View Post
    I unloaded the ATV and helped him bring it to the road and dress it out. Mile marker 32 was the location.
    Isn't that in the Tangle Lakes Archeologicial District? Some might would think the ADF&G Employee would know the law, maybe not. If I were him, reading this post, I would turn myself in and come clean, not to risk losing my job over a caribou. Here is an excerpt from the Feds web site. Pioneering trails used to be OK, but not anymore. You have to pack the animals on your back, if...you want to stay legal.

    "Between October 19 and May 17, a permit is required for
    the use of motorized vehicles off designated trails as shown
    on the Tangle Lakes Archaeological District Special Use
    Area map, except the use of motorized vehicles as provided
    in 11 AAC 96.020(a)(1)(D) and (E) is allowed where snow
    cover or ground frost is sufficient to prevent damage to
    archaeological values. Sufficient snow cover means an
    average of one foot of snow, with a minimum of six inches.
    Sufficient ground frost means a minimum of six inches."
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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