Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: How old is your M1911 .45?

  1. #1
    Member Mkay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    748

    Default How old is your M1911 .45?

    Inherited my stepfathers M1911 .45 with a serial number of 44257, and I think it was made August 1913?
    Anyone got one older?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

  2. #2
    Member .338-06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    I'm not a 1911 expert, nor do I play one on TV-but, I think that the arched main spring housing was added to models later than 1913.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

  3. #3
    Member Mkay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Thanks, The only thing I know is the serial number, as my stepfather died before giving me any history.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    167

    Default

    That's a 1911A1 which was introduced around 1926 I believe. Is it a Colt?

  5. #5
    Member Mkay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    748

    Default

    I am very confuzed about this gun. On one side it has "MODEL OF 1911. U. S. ARMY" and serial number No 44257. The other side has markings of "UNITED STATES PROPERTY" and "COLT'S PT. F. A. MFG. CO" and "PATENTED APR 20. 1897. SEPT 9 1902 DEC 19. 1905. FEB 14. 1911. AUG 19.1913". Yet, it has an arched main spring housing and the checkering on the grips are of later vintage. I wonder if the serial number is fake.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

  6. #6
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    I'm not a 1911 expert, nor do I play one on TV-but, I think that the arched main spring housing was added to models later than 1913.
    I was going to post on the arched MSH, but thought I was going crazy...guess I wasn't too far on the wrong track....

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    The original 1911 had a flat M/S housing and a longer trigger. That is a 1911 frame, not an A-1. The A-1 has the frame milled at an angle behind the trigger. Of course all parts interchange but the frame appears to be 1911.
    Your pistol was likely purchased through the DCM ( now CMP) by NEA member or sometimes just through organized clubs.
    It could well have been made(the frame anyway) in 1913.
    The 1911/1911A-1 were military guns and designed with tolerances and a simplicity of parts to make field strip and repair by parts replacement. The history of such a gun is always interesting. There us no way to know how many conflicts that sidearm has seen. Do you know when it was acquired?
    It may have been "liberated" by a returning soldier and not purchased through DCM. I have my dad's M1 Carbine. It was "liberated" from an armory by his friend after returning from Korea. A small token for. His service.

    Colt was the original contractor but there were many others.
    Enjoy your pistol.
    It's a great piece if history.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  8. #8
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    I'd say the serial number is legit but I doubt it was made 1913. The last patent date was 1913 on all of them. I have a gun made in the 1920's. The patent date has nothing to do with manuf. date. I'm sure there is a web site with s/n info for the 1911. I have a book at home with the info but at work now. Those stallings and patent dates are very common on the millions of 1911's made under us contract.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    4)* Colt: S/N (approx.) 20,000 to 83,856 = Jan. 1913 to Aug. 19, 1913
    ***** S/N 38,001 to 43,900 Navy Model (USS New York) = March 9, 1912 to March 5, 1915


    Just found this info. You're correct. Frame was made 1913.
    Contests. That's an oldie.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  10. #10
    Member Mkay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Murphy, Thank you for the info. My stepfather took the history of this pistol to his grave. I am guessing that perhaps it was made in 1913 but somewhere along the line someone changed a few parts. Would have been cool to have all the original stuff. He was an engine mechanic for the B-25 Medium Bomber but served stateside. His brother joined the Marines in late 1944 and survived the war, but now suffers from dementia. I can only wonder what story this gun could tell.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default A bit more info

    I've got a very similar gun that was sold thru the DCM in the early 60s. Like many other surplus guns, the 1911s were reworked at a number of arsenals and either re-issued or later sold or destroyed.

    Your looks like it has several letters below the serial no. that are probably arsenal rework stamps like SA, FA, AA etc. Sometimes the letters are stamped on the opposite side also. My gun has three different stamps from arsenal reworks - it must have had quite a history.

    The mix of parts is not umcommon although mine maintains the long trigger etc. You check and see if the grips are of WWII vintage or later, they may give you some additional data as to when it was reworked.

    You could also removed the firing pin retaining plate and see if the serial no. under it matchs the frame. Many of the early guns have the last digits of the serial no. stamped there.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mkay View Post
    Inherited my stepfathers M1911 .45 with a serial number of 44257, and I think it was made August 1913?
    Anyone got one older?
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Just looks like a 1911 that was updated by the Army, probably in WWII, to incorporate a short trigger, arched mainspring housing, synthetic grip panels, and Parkerized finish. Very nice piece!!!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default

    You can find all the information you want concerning M911s here: http://forums.1911forum.com/index.php

  14. #14
    Member Mkay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the information. Who knows the places this pistol may have been? Perhaps France in WW1 and WW2, or maybe the Pacific. Even if it just stayed stateside and was used to qualify it did it's duty. To some extent it may have to have been refurbished due to use.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •