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Thread: Haul Road Reminder

  1. #1

    Default Haul Road Reminder

    Drive careful! Saw this UAF truck on the 18th when I drove up from Fairbanks. It was on an uphill straight stretch, and my guess is that the truck downshifted while he was going uphill, RPM's went up, tires spun and he lost control, crossed the road and flipped down the hill. Didn't see any blood, so hopefully nobody was hurt.



    Also up north the sheep were migrating again. Saw 4 3/4-7/8" curl rams close to the road. There were about 50-60 sheep out in the flats that these guys were heading back towards.



    Some caribou out around Toolik, and I saw one loner up by slope mountain. No bears or moose, but did see a lynx about 150 miles north of Fairbanks. If it was a few weeks later, I could have had a chance to get him with the bow since he stayed on the side of the road for a while.

    Drive careful if you are coming up!

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the update, I'm heading up from Fairbanks in a few days. Hope nobody was hurt in that accident. I'll post my hunt/weather and road conditions results when I get back.

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    That accident happened on the 16th. All passengers are OK, other than a little shaken up. This was near Beaver Slide. One of my co-workers was in that vehicle; she had just swapped out drivers after driving across the Yukon.

    No one stopped for about 3 hours after the accident per the co-worker. They walked back to the Yukon Rest area and hitched a ride home with AK-DOT.

    Truck was essentially brand new; insurance paperwork still being sorted.

  4. #4

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    The truck looked brand new, sure is a shame. It still blows me away how cheap Ford is on their superduty tires. They are about as crappy as they come. I almost lost it on the Haul Road one time with a brand new truck as well. The insurance wasn't in place yet and it was a real eye opener to make sure that stuff is done before driving the truck off the lot.

    Glad to hear they are okay. I find it hard to believe that nobody would have stopped to check on them, but seems like there is a lot less courtesy on the road these days. It still looked pretty fresh on the 18th, so I turned around to check it out. Saw one other vehicle in the ditch on the way up as well.

  5. #5
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    Beaver slide to the yukon river... isnt that about 50 miles??? long walk

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    I'm only going on information from my co-worker as to the time they were there waiting. After something like that, it may have felt like 3 hours, but only been 30 minutes; that may never really be known. I am surprised that they were not checked on by anyone else either; but if the hill was that bad, I can understand someone driving by, getting to the top, then walking back down.

    I'm sure more information will come to light in the future, but the main thing is that everyone walked away with no injuries.

    Not sure of distance back to the Yukon River; they may have been headed for Beaver Slide for their project and it happened before then; I just remember hearing my co-worker state that was the area they were in.

  7. #7
    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    I don't believe it is fair to bad mouth a truck manufacturer for not equiping a stock truck exactly to your specific needs. It is the owners responsibility to equip it for the conditions he wants to encounter. Considering that most trucks sold today never are taken off paved roads, it would be bad business to put off road tires on as standard equipment. Easy, though, to blame the manufacturer for your own negligence.

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    It ain't brain surgery to keep a diesel 4x4 truck on a road, even an icy road, regardless of tire tread.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    The grad students working out of Toolik are notorious for driving like idiots. I had but one near death experience working the Dalton. A UAF vehicle got sideways coming down Chandalar Shelf as I was going up. We passed just as he was between over-corrections. Not a scratch, and thank you Lord for that.

    I turned around and followed him down to the chain up area, where he suddenly needed the outhouse, and read them the effing riot act.

    Apparently if you're enrolled at UAF the speed limit is 90ish
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  10. #10
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    It ain't brain surgery to keep a diesel 4x4 truck on a road, even an icy road, regardless of tire tread.
    But it might not be a bad idea for someone who forked out $40k+ for a Ford diesel truck.

  11. #11

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    Rich, I agree, you can't blame the manufacturer, but these trucks are in the 50K plus range these days and the tires are pretty crappy by basic tire standards.

    I agree with the UAF drivers up here, I've seen some that like to push the limits. Not saying that is what this guy did, as it was pretty slick out, but I do know if you are travelling 60+ miles an hour on ice up hill and the truck downshifts and sends the RPM's up, there's a good chance the tires wills start to spin.

    The truck wasn't too far from the bridge, but I can't remember exactly how far it was. The hill wasn't too bad. It took a bit to stop, but I reversed it back down to the truck. It spun a bit getting momentum back up the hill though.

    I've had a couple near death experiences on the road. The closest was a trucker that was going way too fast. He came around a blind corner and his trailer fish tailed right into our lane. We hit the brakes and heard ABS noise but we weren't slowing down very fast. I'm not sure how his trailer straightened out fast enough, but it did and we barely missed it. Jeff from the forum was with me on that run and both of us were pretty quiet for a bit after that realizing how close we just came to getting smashed. It happened just north of Galbraith Lake.

  12. #12

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    Life's not fair.

  13. #13
    Member bilbo's Avatar
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    usually they have either General or Goodyear...sometimes firestone. used all three on SUPERDUTY trucks. no problem with any. saw Steeltex blow for no apparent reason on others trucks. tires are the operators responsibility. speed is the operators responsibilty. air pressure is the operators rsponsibility. I can't blame TIRES unless quality is a proven issue.
    traction treads are the first thing you look at when driving conditions warrant the pucker factor.
    f250/f350/f350drw all have the same load rating....E, unless specifically addressed.

  14. #14
    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    fully agree bilbo, anyone who has problems with these tires has bigger problems with his own driving habits.

  15. #15

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    Shouldn't the U be responsible for the tires on the truck.

  16. #16

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    Are you guys really insinuating that I am saying the cause of this accident was due to tires? Come on.

    My feelings on these tires are that they aren't well suited for the Haul Road or Deadhorse use. More so on gravel than on the ice. I've driven the road dozens of times, and have had my own work trucks in Prudhoe for 14 years now. Never had an accident, and never put it in the ditch. I almost always drive in 2wd as well and have no doubts about my driving ability.

    I've gone through my fair share of trial and error, and have noticed a lot better quality over aftermarket tires than the basic Ford stock tires. I've also found some aftermarket tires that I wouldn't put on my vehicle if somebody gave them to me. It's just an observation, not an excuse for poor driving. The reason I brought it up was that when I went down and looked at the truck, you could see them clear as day and they looked better suited for a mini-van.

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