Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: headspace problem?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Yukon Canada
    Posts
    1,289

    Default headspace problem?

    I had a ruger 77 30/06 re barreled to 35 whelen last spring, and the smith made a mistake and put a 358 winchester barrel on it. I was in a hurry for the gun as I was leaving for the bush for the summer/fall so he stayed late one night and put on a new barrel.
    I had 40 rounds of factory stuff that I put through it first, the rifle shot extremly well and I had no problems. Then I had our bush pilot reload some 225s for me, this guy is a real savvy gun nut and owns 3 whelens himself. Anyway about half of the rounds he reloaded would not shoot, the primer was dented but not hard enough. I thought maybe he was setting the shoulder back to far. Now that I am home I reloaded 40 rounds, 20 225 accubonds and 20 250 NP. All of the 225s I have shot a (about 10) have went off OK but even though according to the nosler reloading book they are medium loads they are to hot for this gun. Im getting flattened primers with this load.
    So today I tried the 250 NP behind 59 grains of RL 15 this load is way to hot for my rifle and out of two rounds one didnt fire. I didnt try any more as the round that did go off left me with a sticky bolt and pancaked primer. Could I have a headspace problem? Would that cause these rounds to show higher pressures? The 225 load was just over 2600 FPS.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Would suspect the shoulder is being pushed back to much when the brass is being resized. Had similar problems with my Whelen using new Remington brass. Head space was rechecked with go-no go gauges and determined to be fine. Then I pulled the bullets out till they engaged the lands and they fired fine. After the brass was once fired I made sure the resizing die was set so the cases would just barely chamber and havent had any problems since.
    I sent the brass back to Remington and they denied there was anything wrong with it (where have we heard this before?).
    Not sure why some of your loads are to hot, other than each rifle handles pressures differently. Are you using military brass that is thicker and usually has less case capacity?
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,909

    Default

    I have 358 Winchester same thing happens. I used 308 brass cause there was no 358 stuff to found. So as Randy said I think I bumped the shoulder to far back. I have yet to try 358 brass.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Yukon Canada
    Posts
    1,289

    Default

    Im using 30/06 winchester brass and remington 35 whelen factory brass. Im thinking it might be the shoulder set to far back too. I had this same problem with a 358 BLR. I never did get that rifle figured out so sold it. I have some loads that are neck sized only I will try today hope it fixes the problem as this rifle really shoots. Thanks for the info, I will be taking it to a smith with a go no go gauge and have it checked anyway.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    739

    Default

    The flattened primers are more an indication of excessive headspace than a "hot load". With too much headspace, the brass is coming BACK to hit the bolt head HARDER than normal and flatten the primer. A "Go - No Go Gauge" will be the answer to work out the problem.
    Keep us informed as to what happened.

  6. #6
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default

    I agree that the shoulder is probably set back too far. I've had similar issues with unfired Rem. brass and factory loads. No issues at all with once fired brass. I do not FL size my brass when reloading.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    739

    Default

    walk-in,
    Full length sizing is NOT the problem. I FL everything because I can control how much shoulder set back I want. Neck sizing ONLY has proven in many cases to cause more "run-out" ( crooked brass ). Why? Because the neck sizing die does NOT support or contact the body of the case and allows it to get crooked.
    Try this. Slip on the correct shellholder, raise the ram up. Screw in your FL die until it contacts the shellholder. Now unscrew it 1/2 turn and lightly lock the ring. Size a lubed case as normal and now see how it chambers in the rifle. If the bolt closes with any resistance, unlock the ring and turn the die down about 1/16 (scosh) of a revolution. Repeat with another case and check with the rifles chamber. Repeat this until you get an unforced chambering of the empty sized case. This will work the brass as little as needed so as to prevent casehead separation and minimize shoulder setback.
    Hornady makes a Headspace Gauge Kit that you use with a caliper to measure in the thousandths.
    Anyway just a thought.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •