Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Roof drip edge?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    1

    Default Roof drip edge?

    Getting ready to finish my roof. Does anyone know if a drip edge is a must? We live in sutton, sometimes lots of snow, sometimes not. First time doing a roof and just want to make sure I do it right. Thanks for looking.

  2. #2
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,366

    Default

    As long as you have tar paper, Ice shield on the edge and extend your shingles a little past your eve line,(overhang) you will be fine. You do know what Ice/water shield is, right? It is that rubber membrane that comes like tar paper and you put it on the first 3 feet of roof at the eve line.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  3. #3
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Drip edge is a nice protector for your facia board. If you can afford it, it's good insurance. Your ice and water shield should extend about 18" in past the line of your exterior walls. It's a barrier against water ****ing from ice build-up at the cold eave overhangs. I know in Minnesota, ice and water is a code requirement. Not sure how the rules read in Alaska. In any case, I would recommend you use both for a good roof protection. Just my opinion tho.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  4. #4
    Member AkKevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canton, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    119

    Default edge of roof

    UnderAKskies

    Yes by all means use a drip edge in conjunction with the ice shield. What happens here isnt so much the snow situation as much as the water " wicks up" under the singles creating ice build up, wood rot ect. use aluminum facia over top your facia board to prevent wood rot from splashing. Also turn your first row of shingles upside down to protect the top layers tabs( slots in the shingle). You end up with two layers of shingles on you first bottom row.
    Hook blades for your utility knife a plus.
    Kevin

    ps if you need more help ill send a pic
    Are we talking about goals or are we talking about dreams? AkKevin The one and only

  5. #5
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Yes for asphalt shingles and yes for steel. AKKevin has it totally correct. It will absolutely save your facia. I sell what is called "D" flashing..SBS, Depot, and Lowes all will have it. It provides a 1" lip and I run it both on my eave and my gable sides. That is for shingles. For steel, just order eave flashing and gable flashing when you buy your steel.

    A word on Ice and Water shield. I sell a TON of it. It's great stuff. However, it is not a replacement for proper eave, ridge and gable end venting. With a properly constructed roof you should never need it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I just wanted to thou my 2 cents as well, when i lived in CO it was code on the ice shield and drip edge. When i moved up here my house did not have it and when i started getting thing around the place fixed up that was one of the first fixes i did. I was unable to do the ice shield but the drip edge did get done.
    I have never seen the amount of damage before like up here if you don't put in the drip and ice shield. The rood decking just soaks up the water if not protected and everything will go down hill from there.
    You will be glad in the long run to make the investment now.
    Good luck

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  7. #7
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    Drip edge or flashing is a must, you didnt say wether it was a metal or shingle roof...........?
    Canted fascia or plumb cut?

    If you plan on some type of gutters at some point, a plumb fascia is best and the standard D-style can be on the small size.
    Also D-style is typically bent at a 90 and the eave of your roof is not, (unless its a flat roof), the D-style will work ok on a shallower pitches such as a 3-12 or less.
    What happens is the roofers are always trying to fit it to either the roof or the fascia, since its bent at a 90 it fits neither correctly.
    If the installer fits it to the fascia, then it can raise up the shingles slighty and water can run sideways in and under the shingles.
    Its best to have flashing bent to match your roof pitch, slight kick out at the bottom to direct the water away from the wood fascia.
    Also the flashing should be installed under the felt or the ice & water shield. Not often done this way cause most roofers want to get the roof dried in quickly and then put the edge metal on last. If you ever have a leak the water will run right under the flashing.

    While I would still reccomend flashing on a metal roof it is not as critical (Usally required by the bank). On a shingle roof surface tension on the water causes the water to hang onto the shingle, it will creep right up a 6-12 shingle, soon enough the fascia is wet and even the edge of the roof deck, overtime it can be a issue.

    Metal roofs are different, becasue the metal is thinner than a shingle there is not enough surface tension for the water to creep up the back side and will usally just drip off right at the edge.

    There is a ton of ways to mess up a roof project.........

    If you need more specific info, PM me and I can give you a call..........John
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    John- I used to totally agree on the metal roof side of things, until I had to replace my facia on a 5/12 pitch entryway roof. The longer runs had no issue with lack of fascia trim, but for some reason that short run crawled back up the underside and ran down the fascia. I never did figure it out, but at $10 a stick for painted steel eave I'll use it every time now.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    John- I used to totally agree on the metal roof side of things, until I had to replace my facia on a 5/12 pitch entryway roof. The longer runs had no issue with lack of fascia trim, but for some reason that short run crawled back up the underside and ran down the fascia. I never did figure it out, but at $10 a stick for painted steel eave I'll use it every time now.
    Yes, flashing all the way around is the right thing to do, we do a lot of seamless gutters and esentially we do not guarantee anything against drips w/o flashing.
    We install a lot of flashing after the fact and it can be a pain, sometimes folks dont want to pay for it, especially if its right after they had a new roof put on. And they trusted it was done right...............better to do it right the first time..............
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    The longer runs had no issue with lack of fascia trim, but for some reason that short run crawled back up the underside and ran down the fascia. I never did figure it out, but at $10 a stick for painted steel eave I'll use it every time now.
    It’s a product of less water traveling slower. Momentum and mass make it less likely to reverse direction off a longer run. I had those surface tension gutter caps on my steel roofed shop in Arizona with a 20’ run on one side and a 70’ on the other. They worked great on the 20’ but the water just blew right past like it was a ski ramp during even moderate rain on the 70’ side. Just too much speed and volume for it to turn that corner into the gutter.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  11. #11
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyH View Post
    Drip edge is a nice protector for your facia board. If you can afford it, it's good insurance. Your ice and water shield should extend about 18" in past the line of your exterior walls. It's a barrier against water ****ing from ice build-up at the cold eave overhangs. I know in Minnesota, ice and water is a code requirement. Not sure how the rules read in Alaska. In any case, I would recommend you use both for a good roof protection. Just my opinion tho.

    True, but your whole roof should be cold. If getting ice build up, either not enough insulation or a heat source in the attic.


    Since you are up there working, if not a roof vent, cut one in the lenght of the main house. Make sure the vents are open and not plugged off with insulation. Rent an insulation blower from SBS and get the insulation bags there too, rental end up being free I believe.

    Like others have said, it is a good idea, but not a cover up for other problems!

  12. #12
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Yea if it’s not vented right the sheathing can rot from the condensation in the attic no matter how water tight the roof is from above. If you’re getting ice dams on a normal basis the attic venting needs to be addressed. Ice shield is insurance for when something goes wrong not the cure for ice dams from poor venting.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  13. #13
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    True, but your whole roof should be cold. If getting ice build up, either not enough insulation or a heat source in the attic.


    Since you are up there working, if not a roof vent, cut one in the lenght of the main house. Make sure the vents are open and not plugged off with insulation. Rent an insulation blower from SBS and get the insulation bags there too, rental end up being free I believe.

    Like others have said, it is a good idea, but not a cover up for other problems!
    Very true, but the whole ice and water thing started I think because of poorly vented / insulated attics in the first place. A vented attic will still be warmer than the eve in any case, just from the heat generated by sunlight on the shingles. All the insulation and venting in the world won't shut off the suns effects. JMO
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    northern Minnesota
    Posts
    7

    Default

    So with the roof vented in a regular type roof, with a space above the insulation and below the sheating, how about one that is insulated in the rafters with living space under, as in a loft would you still vent above the insulation with the egg carton things or pack full with the insulation?

  15. #15
    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by northwoods gal View Post
    So with the roof vented in a regular type roof, with a space above the insulation and below the sheating, how about one that is insulated in the rafters with living space under, as in a loft would you still vent above the insulation with the egg carton things or pack full with the insulation?
    Any venting you can do, regardless of roof design is always a plus. Main thing is to keep the roof sheething cold in the winter so you do not get melting on the shingles. Thats where the ice damming will start on your cold eaves and force water back under your shingles. The minute you let your insulation touch the roof sheathing tightly, it becomes whats called a hot roof. No big problem if you live in an area that doesn't get snow in the winter, but we get lots of snow here. Cold roof for Alaska is my recommendation.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    northern Minnesota
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Hey thanks, My daughter and I are currently building a stick frame cabin in MN a 14 X 24 with a 14 X 14 loft that extends over the porch. We got to the 2x10's rafters and the sheeting on them. I was thinking about the insulation and air barrier between sheeting and batts just wasn't sure if it should be about 2" space or not. I'll eventually box in the eaves wasn't sure if the insulation should stop at the wall edge or extend over some. The eaves will have vents put in if need be. I wanted hands on experience and not just experience with a shed building. We put in a 8X16 basement and a rain water cistern also. It will have pv panels with battery bank and a small shower/bath along with an out door privy. A wood stove with a rock surrounding it. I'm going to practice on the base of the privy with the rock and mud before I do the stove. Well thanks for the info I have learned a lot on this site.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •